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Parastomal intestinal evisceration.

Moffett PM, Younggren BN - West J Emerg Med (2010)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Madigan Army Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Tacoma WA.

No MeSH data available.


Abdominal exam findings after ileostomy bag removal (from above).
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f2-wjem-11-214: Abdominal exam findings after ileostomy bag removal (from above).

Mentions: A 23-year-old male with a history of Crohn’s disease and prior ileostomy, presented to the emergency department complaining of his “intestines coming out.” The patient reported feeling pain and a fullness in his ileostomy bag after being punched in the abdomen. The bag was removed and an evisceration of approximately two feet (60 cm) of his small intestine around the ileostomy stoma was noted (Figures 1 and 2). There was no evidence of strangulation, and approximately one foot of the intestines was reduced with slow pressure from a gloved finger. The remainder could not be reduced and was covered in warm, saline-soak gauze, and a surgical consult was obtained. The patient received a laparotomy with diversion of his ileostomy to his left side but did not require resection of the small bowl.


Parastomal intestinal evisceration.

Moffett PM, Younggren BN - West J Emerg Med (2010)

Abdominal exam findings after ileostomy bag removal (from above).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2908664&req=5

f2-wjem-11-214: Abdominal exam findings after ileostomy bag removal (from above).
Mentions: A 23-year-old male with a history of Crohn’s disease and prior ileostomy, presented to the emergency department complaining of his “intestines coming out.” The patient reported feeling pain and a fullness in his ileostomy bag after being punched in the abdomen. The bag was removed and an evisceration of approximately two feet (60 cm) of his small intestine around the ileostomy stoma was noted (Figures 1 and 2). There was no evidence of strangulation, and approximately one foot of the intestines was reduced with slow pressure from a gloved finger. The remainder could not be reduced and was covered in warm, saline-soak gauze, and a surgical consult was obtained. The patient received a laparotomy with diversion of his ileostomy to his left side but did not require resection of the small bowl.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Madigan Army Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Tacoma WA.

No MeSH data available.