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Preparing children with a mock scanner training protocol results in high quality structural and functional MRI scans.

de Bie HM, Boersma M, Wattjes MP, Adriaanse S, Vermeulen RJ, Oostrom KJ, Huisman J, Veltman DJ, Delemarre-Van de Waal HA - Eur. J. Pediatr. (2010)

Bottom Line: Children were referred to the actual MRI investigation only when they passed the training.It may reduce the need for sedation in young children undergoing MRI.Our protocol is also effective in preparing young children to participate in fMRI investigations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Endocrinology, VU University Medical Center, PO Box 7057, 1007 MB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. b.debie@vumc.nl

ABSTRACT
We evaluated the use of a mock scanner training protocol as an alternative for sedation and for preparing young children for (functional) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Children with severe mental retardation or developmental disorders were excluded. A group of 90 children (median age 6.5 years, range 3.65-14.5 years) participated in this study. Children were referred to the actual MRI investigation only when they passed the training. We assessed the pass rate of the mock scanner training sessions. In addition, the quality of both structural and functional MRI (fMRI) scans was rated on a semi-quantitative scale. The overall pass rate of the mock scanner training sessions was 85/90. Structural scans of diagnostic quality were obtained in 81/90 children, and fMRI scans with sufficient quality for further analysis were obtained in 30/43 of the children. Even in children under 7 years of age, who are generally sedated, the success rate of structural scans with diagnostic quality was 53/60. FMRI scans with sufficient quality were obtained in 23/36 of the children in this younger age group. The association between age and proportion of children with fMRI scans of sufficient quality was not statistically significant. We conclude that a mock MRI scanner training protocol can be useful to prepare children for a diagnostic MRI scan. It may reduce the need for sedation in young children undergoing MRI. Our protocol is also effective in preparing young children to participate in fMRI investigations.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Quality of structural MRI scans grouped by age in 90 children
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Fig3: Quality of structural MRI scans grouped by age in 90 children

Mentions: The overall quality of the structural MRI scans in the 45 children in the MRI group, as well as in the 40 children in the fMRI group, was high for all ages (Fig. 3). In the total sample, 81 out of 90 had scans of acceptable to excellent quality (score 1–3, Table 2). Two girls of 9 and 14 years of age completed the MRI investigation but their scans showed excessive motion artifacts. One of the girls has a general developmental disorder with a severe form of epilepsy, and the other girl has Gilles De La Tourette Syndrome. In two other children, both 4 years of age, the MRI investigation had to be aborted because of anxiety of the children. Once children had passed the mock scanner training protocol, there were no age related differences with respect to quality of the structural MRI scans.Fig. 3


Preparing children with a mock scanner training protocol results in high quality structural and functional MRI scans.

de Bie HM, Boersma M, Wattjes MP, Adriaanse S, Vermeulen RJ, Oostrom KJ, Huisman J, Veltman DJ, Delemarre-Van de Waal HA - Eur. J. Pediatr. (2010)

Quality of structural MRI scans grouped by age in 90 children
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2908445&req=5

Fig3: Quality of structural MRI scans grouped by age in 90 children
Mentions: The overall quality of the structural MRI scans in the 45 children in the MRI group, as well as in the 40 children in the fMRI group, was high for all ages (Fig. 3). In the total sample, 81 out of 90 had scans of acceptable to excellent quality (score 1–3, Table 2). Two girls of 9 and 14 years of age completed the MRI investigation but their scans showed excessive motion artifacts. One of the girls has a general developmental disorder with a severe form of epilepsy, and the other girl has Gilles De La Tourette Syndrome. In two other children, both 4 years of age, the MRI investigation had to be aborted because of anxiety of the children. Once children had passed the mock scanner training protocol, there were no age related differences with respect to quality of the structural MRI scans.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Children were referred to the actual MRI investigation only when they passed the training.It may reduce the need for sedation in young children undergoing MRI.Our protocol is also effective in preparing young children to participate in fMRI investigations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Endocrinology, VU University Medical Center, PO Box 7057, 1007 MB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. b.debie@vumc.nl

ABSTRACT
We evaluated the use of a mock scanner training protocol as an alternative for sedation and for preparing young children for (functional) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Children with severe mental retardation or developmental disorders were excluded. A group of 90 children (median age 6.5 years, range 3.65-14.5 years) participated in this study. Children were referred to the actual MRI investigation only when they passed the training. We assessed the pass rate of the mock scanner training sessions. In addition, the quality of both structural and functional MRI (fMRI) scans was rated on a semi-quantitative scale. The overall pass rate of the mock scanner training sessions was 85/90. Structural scans of diagnostic quality were obtained in 81/90 children, and fMRI scans with sufficient quality for further analysis were obtained in 30/43 of the children. Even in children under 7 years of age, who are generally sedated, the success rate of structural scans with diagnostic quality was 53/60. FMRI scans with sufficient quality were obtained in 23/36 of the children in this younger age group. The association between age and proportion of children with fMRI scans of sufficient quality was not statistically significant. We conclude that a mock MRI scanner training protocol can be useful to prepare children for a diagnostic MRI scan. It may reduce the need for sedation in young children undergoing MRI. Our protocol is also effective in preparing young children to participate in fMRI investigations.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus