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Does lower birth order amplify the association between high socioeconomic status and central adiposity in young adult Filipino males?

Dahly DL, Adair LS - Int J Obes (Lond) (2010)

Bottom Line: Lower birth order was associated with higher waist circumference and increased odds of high waist circumference, even after adjustment for socioeconomic status in young adulthood and maternal characteristics that could impact later offspring adiposity.Furthermore, the positive association between socioeconomic status and central adiposity was amplified in individuals characterized by lower birth order.This research has failed to reject the mismatch hypothesis, which posits that maternal constraint of fetal growth acts to program developing physiology in a manner that increases susceptibility to the obesogenic effects of modern environments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. d.l.dahly@leeds.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To test the hypothesis that lower birth order amplifies the positive association between socioeconomic status and central adiposity in young adult males from a lower income, developing country context.

Design: The Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey is an ongoing community-based, observational study of a 1-year birth cohort (1983).

Subjects: 970 young adult males, mean age 21.5 years (2005).

Measurements: Central adiposity measured by waist circumference; birth order; perinatal maternal characteristics including height, arm fat area, age and smoking behavior; socioeconomic status at birth and in young adulthood.

Results: Lower birth order was associated with higher waist circumference and increased odds of high waist circumference, even after adjustment for socioeconomic status in young adulthood and maternal characteristics that could impact later offspring adiposity. Furthermore, the positive association between socioeconomic status and central adiposity was amplified in individuals characterized by lower birth order.

Conclusions: This research has failed to reject the mismatch hypothesis, which posits that maternal constraint of fetal growth acts to program developing physiology in a manner that increases susceptibility to the obesogenic effects of modern environments.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Theoretical model
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Figure 1: Theoretical model

Mentions: The theoretical model that describes the hypothesized relationships among variables included in this analysis is given in figure 1. The primary exposure, birth order, was assessed during the baseline interview (1983). Birth order is represented continuously or as firstborn status (versus all others) in our analyses.


Does lower birth order amplify the association between high socioeconomic status and central adiposity in young adult Filipino males?

Dahly DL, Adair LS - Int J Obes (Lond) (2010)

Theoretical model
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2908417&req=5

Figure 1: Theoretical model
Mentions: The theoretical model that describes the hypothesized relationships among variables included in this analysis is given in figure 1. The primary exposure, birth order, was assessed during the baseline interview (1983). Birth order is represented continuously or as firstborn status (versus all others) in our analyses.

Bottom Line: Lower birth order was associated with higher waist circumference and increased odds of high waist circumference, even after adjustment for socioeconomic status in young adulthood and maternal characteristics that could impact later offspring adiposity.Furthermore, the positive association between socioeconomic status and central adiposity was amplified in individuals characterized by lower birth order.This research has failed to reject the mismatch hypothesis, which posits that maternal constraint of fetal growth acts to program developing physiology in a manner that increases susceptibility to the obesogenic effects of modern environments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. d.l.dahly@leeds.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To test the hypothesis that lower birth order amplifies the positive association between socioeconomic status and central adiposity in young adult males from a lower income, developing country context.

Design: The Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey is an ongoing community-based, observational study of a 1-year birth cohort (1983).

Subjects: 970 young adult males, mean age 21.5 years (2005).

Measurements: Central adiposity measured by waist circumference; birth order; perinatal maternal characteristics including height, arm fat area, age and smoking behavior; socioeconomic status at birth and in young adulthood.

Results: Lower birth order was associated with higher waist circumference and increased odds of high waist circumference, even after adjustment for socioeconomic status in young adulthood and maternal characteristics that could impact later offspring adiposity. Furthermore, the positive association between socioeconomic status and central adiposity was amplified in individuals characterized by lower birth order.

Conclusions: This research has failed to reject the mismatch hypothesis, which posits that maternal constraint of fetal growth acts to program developing physiology in a manner that increases susceptibility to the obesogenic effects of modern environments.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus