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7.0 Tesla MRI Brain Atlas: In vivo atlas with cryomacrotome correlation

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Their product promises to be the new reference atlas for functional neurosurgeons and neuroscientists at large... This atlas brings knowledge from exquisite anatomy specimen preparation matched to modern radiological imaging techniques... The well designed and consistent methodology of this atlas allied to the exquisite attention to details is timely to permit the development of one of the most promising and elegant fields in neurosurgery, neuromodulation, which undoubtedly depends on such reliable anatomy to exploit functional imaging... Cadaveric and UHF-MRI slices are referenced and compared based on anterior and posterior commissural planes... This makes this 7.0 Tesla MRI Atlas of great relevance for stereotactic surgeons... At 2 mm intervals, the images are compared taking advantage of various magnifications to detail the in vivo visualization of the brain structure... The authors have tried to comply with the most common standard of MRI studies in the western world, i.e. the viewer sees the brain images as if seeing axial slices caudal to cranial bound and coronal slices front to back bound, therefore right side is on the left hand of the viewer on axial and coronal images... Such simple details make this work easy to use as a reference for neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons alike... At most fine detail, as atlases are used in stereotactic surgery, common targets such as subthalamic nucleus, globus pallidus internun and thalamic nuclei, although represented in this atlas, neurosurgeons will still have to rely on traditional stereotactic measurements in their individual patient, as we have yet to have a reliable probabilistic atlas capable to obviate the need for electrophysiology and traditional stereotactic approaches... These measurements are well represented by Cho et al assuring their work usefulness during the years to come... This atlas is a must in the library of functional neurosurgeons.

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7.0 Tesla MRI Brain Atlas: In vivo atlas with cryomacrotome correlation
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2908365&req=5

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Their product promises to be the new reference atlas for functional neurosurgeons and neuroscientists at large... This atlas brings knowledge from exquisite anatomy specimen preparation matched to modern radiological imaging techniques... The well designed and consistent methodology of this atlas allied to the exquisite attention to details is timely to permit the development of one of the most promising and elegant fields in neurosurgery, neuromodulation, which undoubtedly depends on such reliable anatomy to exploit functional imaging... Cadaveric and UHF-MRI slices are referenced and compared based on anterior and posterior commissural planes... This makes this 7.0 Tesla MRI Atlas of great relevance for stereotactic surgeons... At 2 mm intervals, the images are compared taking advantage of various magnifications to detail the in vivo visualization of the brain structure... The authors have tried to comply with the most common standard of MRI studies in the western world, i.e. the viewer sees the brain images as if seeing axial slices caudal to cranial bound and coronal slices front to back bound, therefore right side is on the left hand of the viewer on axial and coronal images... Such simple details make this work easy to use as a reference for neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons alike... At most fine detail, as atlases are used in stereotactic surgery, common targets such as subthalamic nucleus, globus pallidus internun and thalamic nuclei, although represented in this atlas, neurosurgeons will still have to rely on traditional stereotactic measurements in their individual patient, as we have yet to have a reliable probabilistic atlas capable to obviate the need for electrophysiology and traditional stereotactic approaches... These measurements are well represented by Cho et al assuring their work usefulness during the years to come... This atlas is a must in the library of functional neurosurgeons.

No MeSH data available.