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The mouse model is suitable for the study of viral factors governing transmission and pathogenesis of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses in mammals.

Rigoni M, Toffan A, Viale E, Mancin M, Cilloni F, Bertoli E, Salomoni A, Marciano S, Milani A, Zecchin B, Capua I, Cattoli G - Vet. Res. (2010)

Bottom Line: Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of the H5 and H7 subtype pose a major public health threat due to their capacity to cross the species barrier and infect mammals, for example dogs, cats and humans.In this study we show that selected H7N1 and H5N1 HPAI viruses can be transmitted from mouse-to-mouse by direct contact, and that in experimentally infected animals they exhibit a different pattern of replication and transmission.Our results can be considered as a starting point for transmission experiments involving other influenza A viruses with alpha 2-3 receptor affinity in order to better understand the viral factors influencing transmissibility of these viruses in selected mammalian species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: OIE/FAO and National Reference Laboratory for Avian Influenza and Newcastle disease, OIE Collaborating Centre for Diseases at the Animal-Human Interface, Research & Development Department, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie, Viale dell'Università 10, 35020 Legnaro, Padova, Italy. mrigoni@izsvenezie.it

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Nasal shedding of infected mice on days 3, 5, 7 and 9 p.i. Twelve female BALB/c mice of 4–6 weeks of age were infected with 10 LD50 of each virus to evaluate nasal shedding. On days 3, 5, 7 and 9 p.i., 3 mice from each group were sacrificed and nasal washes were applied. Nasal washes were tested by quantitative Real-Time RT-PCR and viral isolation.
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Figure 2: Nasal shedding of infected mice on days 3, 5, 7 and 9 p.i. Twelve female BALB/c mice of 4–6 weeks of age were infected with 10 LD50 of each virus to evaluate nasal shedding. On days 3, 5, 7 and 9 p.i., 3 mice from each group were sacrificed and nasal washes were applied. Nasal washes were tested by quantitative Real-Time RT-PCR and viral isolation.


The mouse model is suitable for the study of viral factors governing transmission and pathogenesis of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses in mammals.

Rigoni M, Toffan A, Viale E, Mancin M, Cilloni F, Bertoli E, Salomoni A, Marciano S, Milani A, Zecchin B, Capua I, Cattoli G - Vet. Res. (2010)

Nasal shedding of infected mice on days 3, 5, 7 and 9 p.i. Twelve female BALB/c mice of 4–6 weeks of age were infected with 10 LD50 of each virus to evaluate nasal shedding. On days 3, 5, 7 and 9 p.i., 3 mice from each group were sacrificed and nasal washes were applied. Nasal washes were tested by quantitative Real-Time RT-PCR and viral isolation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2908239&req=5

Figure 2: Nasal shedding of infected mice on days 3, 5, 7 and 9 p.i. Twelve female BALB/c mice of 4–6 weeks of age were infected with 10 LD50 of each virus to evaluate nasal shedding. On days 3, 5, 7 and 9 p.i., 3 mice from each group were sacrificed and nasal washes were applied. Nasal washes were tested by quantitative Real-Time RT-PCR and viral isolation.
Bottom Line: Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of the H5 and H7 subtype pose a major public health threat due to their capacity to cross the species barrier and infect mammals, for example dogs, cats and humans.In this study we show that selected H7N1 and H5N1 HPAI viruses can be transmitted from mouse-to-mouse by direct contact, and that in experimentally infected animals they exhibit a different pattern of replication and transmission.Our results can be considered as a starting point for transmission experiments involving other influenza A viruses with alpha 2-3 receptor affinity in order to better understand the viral factors influencing transmissibility of these viruses in selected mammalian species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: OIE/FAO and National Reference Laboratory for Avian Influenza and Newcastle disease, OIE Collaborating Centre for Diseases at the Animal-Human Interface, Research & Development Department, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie, Viale dell'Università 10, 35020 Legnaro, Padova, Italy. mrigoni@izsvenezie.it

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus