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The effect of intravenous low dose ketamine for reducing postoperative sore throat.

Park SY, Kim SH, Noh JI, Lee SM, Kim MG, Kim SH, Ok SY, Kim SI - Korean J Anesthesiol (2010)

Bottom Line: The incidence and severity of POST were recorded.No significant differences in the incidence and severity of POST during the 24 h after the operation were found between the two groups (21/31 in the ketamine group vs. 26/34 in the control group, P = 0.398).Intravenous injection of low dose ketamine was not effective for reducing POST.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of intravenous low dose ketamine for reducing the incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat (POST).

Methods: This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial. The study population consisted of 70 patients between 20 and 70 years old who were classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II and were scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The patients were divided randomly into two groups. Patients in the ketamine group received an intravenous injection of 0.5 mg/kg of ketamine just before induction, followed by 10 microg/kg/min throughout the operation. Patients in the control group received intravenous saline instead of ketamine. The patients were interviewed 1, 6, and 24 h after the operation. The incidence and severity of POST were recorded.

Results: No significant differences in the incidence and severity of POST during the 24 h after the operation were found between the two groups (21/31 in the ketamine group vs. 26/34 in the control group, P = 0.398).

Conclusions: Intravenous injection of low dose ketamine was not effective for reducing POST.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The visual analog scale (VAS) scores of postoperative sore throat. No significant differences are found between the groups.
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Figure 1: The visual analog scale (VAS) scores of postoperative sore throat. No significant differences are found between the groups.

Mentions: During the 24 hours after the operation, no significant difference in the incidence of POST or the incidence of cough and hoarseness was observed between the two groups (Table 2). The VAS scores of POST and wound pain were not significantly different between the two groups (Fig. 1, 2). The total doses of fentanyl administered during induction and for 24 hours after the operation were 32.3 ± 47.4 µg in the ketamine group and 40.3 ± 43.6 µg in the control group (P = 0.483).


The effect of intravenous low dose ketamine for reducing postoperative sore throat.

Park SY, Kim SH, Noh JI, Lee SM, Kim MG, Kim SH, Ok SY, Kim SI - Korean J Anesthesiol (2010)

The visual analog scale (VAS) scores of postoperative sore throat. No significant differences are found between the groups.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2908222&req=5

Figure 1: The visual analog scale (VAS) scores of postoperative sore throat. No significant differences are found between the groups.
Mentions: During the 24 hours after the operation, no significant difference in the incidence of POST or the incidence of cough and hoarseness was observed between the two groups (Table 2). The VAS scores of POST and wound pain were not significantly different between the two groups (Fig. 1, 2). The total doses of fentanyl administered during induction and for 24 hours after the operation were 32.3 ± 47.4 µg in the ketamine group and 40.3 ± 43.6 µg in the control group (P = 0.483).

Bottom Line: The incidence and severity of POST were recorded.No significant differences in the incidence and severity of POST during the 24 h after the operation were found between the two groups (21/31 in the ketamine group vs. 26/34 in the control group, P = 0.398).Intravenous injection of low dose ketamine was not effective for reducing POST.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of intravenous low dose ketamine for reducing the incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat (POST).

Methods: This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial. The study population consisted of 70 patients between 20 and 70 years old who were classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II and were scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The patients were divided randomly into two groups. Patients in the ketamine group received an intravenous injection of 0.5 mg/kg of ketamine just before induction, followed by 10 microg/kg/min throughout the operation. Patients in the control group received intravenous saline instead of ketamine. The patients were interviewed 1, 6, and 24 h after the operation. The incidence and severity of POST were recorded.

Results: No significant differences in the incidence and severity of POST during the 24 h after the operation were found between the two groups (21/31 in the ketamine group vs. 26/34 in the control group, P = 0.398).

Conclusions: Intravenous injection of low dose ketamine was not effective for reducing POST.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus