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Is the Airtraq optical laryngoscope effective in tracheal intubation by novice personnel?

Park SJ, Lee WK, Lee DH - Korean J Anesthesiol (2010)

Bottom Line: We compared the effectiveness of AOL with Macintosh laryngoscope for tracheal intubation by novice personnel.The total success rate was similar in the two groups, but the success rate at first attempt was higher in group A (P < 0.01).The AOL is a more effective instrument for tracheal intubation than Macintosh laryngoscope when used by novice personnel.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Macintosh laryngoscopic intubation is a lifesaving procedure, but a difficult skill to learn. The Airtraq optical laryngoscope (AOL) is a novel intubation device with advantages over the direct laryngoscope for untrained personnel in a manikin study. We compared the effectiveness of AOL with Macintosh laryngoscope for tracheal intubation by novice personnel.

Methods: We selected 37 medical students with no prior tracheal intubation experience and educated them on using both laryngoscopes. Seventy-four patients were randomly divided into two groups (group A: AOL, group M: Macintosh laryngoscope). We recorded the tracheal intubation success rate, intubation time, number of attempts, intubation difficulty scale, and adverse effects.

Results: The total success rate was similar in the two groups, but the success rate at first attempt was higher in group A (P < 0.01). Group A also showed reduced duration and attempts at intubation, as well as adverse effects such as oral cavity injury. Additionally, participant reports indicated that using the AOL was easier than the Macintosh laryngoscope (P < 0.01).

Conclusions: The AOL is a more effective instrument for tracheal intubation than Macintosh laryngoscope when used by novice personnel.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Photograph of the Airtraq optical laryngoscope (AOL). The blade of the AOL is anatomically shaped and consists of two parallel channels. One channel performs as the placing and inserting of the endotracheal tube. The other channel houses a distal lens and LED light. The image of the glottic structures and the tip of the tracheal tube is transferred to a viewfinder.
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Figure 1: Photograph of the Airtraq optical laryngoscope (AOL). The blade of the AOL is anatomically shaped and consists of two parallel channels. One channel performs as the placing and inserting of the endotracheal tube. The other channel houses a distal lens and LED light. The image of the glottic structures and the tip of the tracheal tube is transferred to a viewfinder.

Mentions: Endotracheal intubation is performed using the laryngoscope at a sniffing position to secure a close proximity view of the glottis and align the oral, pharyngeal, and laryngeal axes. Tracheal intubation requires a great deal of clinical experience to master, such that performing intubation more than 47 times only produces a 90% success rate of intubation [1]. Consequently, other instruments that facilitate endotracheal intubation may replace the conventional direct laryngoscope, including the Airtraq optical laryngoscope (AOL, Airtraq®, Guangzhou Intmed Medical Appliance Co., Guangzhou, China) (Fig. 1). The AOL is similar to the direct laryngoscope, but consists of a body with built-in lens and mirror, a view-finder, and a rail for fixing the tracheal tube. The attached lens allows direct observation of the larynx and facilitates endotracheal intubation. In a study using a training dummy, the success rate of AOL intubation was significantly higher and the time to secure the airway was also shorter than using the Macintosh direct laryngoscope [2]. However, tracheal intubation in real patients is challenging, especially for novices, even with sufficient training in dummies [1]. Therefore, we compared the performance of the AOL and Macintosh laryngoscopes for endotracheal intubation by novice physicians for general anesthesia.


Is the Airtraq optical laryngoscope effective in tracheal intubation by novice personnel?

Park SJ, Lee WK, Lee DH - Korean J Anesthesiol (2010)

Photograph of the Airtraq optical laryngoscope (AOL). The blade of the AOL is anatomically shaped and consists of two parallel channels. One channel performs as the placing and inserting of the endotracheal tube. The other channel houses a distal lens and LED light. The image of the glottic structures and the tip of the tracheal tube is transferred to a viewfinder.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2908221&req=5

Figure 1: Photograph of the Airtraq optical laryngoscope (AOL). The blade of the AOL is anatomically shaped and consists of two parallel channels. One channel performs as the placing and inserting of the endotracheal tube. The other channel houses a distal lens and LED light. The image of the glottic structures and the tip of the tracheal tube is transferred to a viewfinder.
Mentions: Endotracheal intubation is performed using the laryngoscope at a sniffing position to secure a close proximity view of the glottis and align the oral, pharyngeal, and laryngeal axes. Tracheal intubation requires a great deal of clinical experience to master, such that performing intubation more than 47 times only produces a 90% success rate of intubation [1]. Consequently, other instruments that facilitate endotracheal intubation may replace the conventional direct laryngoscope, including the Airtraq optical laryngoscope (AOL, Airtraq®, Guangzhou Intmed Medical Appliance Co., Guangzhou, China) (Fig. 1). The AOL is similar to the direct laryngoscope, but consists of a body with built-in lens and mirror, a view-finder, and a rail for fixing the tracheal tube. The attached lens allows direct observation of the larynx and facilitates endotracheal intubation. In a study using a training dummy, the success rate of AOL intubation was significantly higher and the time to secure the airway was also shorter than using the Macintosh direct laryngoscope [2]. However, tracheal intubation in real patients is challenging, especially for novices, even with sufficient training in dummies [1]. Therefore, we compared the performance of the AOL and Macintosh laryngoscopes for endotracheal intubation by novice physicians for general anesthesia.

Bottom Line: We compared the effectiveness of AOL with Macintosh laryngoscope for tracheal intubation by novice personnel.The total success rate was similar in the two groups, but the success rate at first attempt was higher in group A (P < 0.01).The AOL is a more effective instrument for tracheal intubation than Macintosh laryngoscope when used by novice personnel.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Macintosh laryngoscopic intubation is a lifesaving procedure, but a difficult skill to learn. The Airtraq optical laryngoscope (AOL) is a novel intubation device with advantages over the direct laryngoscope for untrained personnel in a manikin study. We compared the effectiveness of AOL with Macintosh laryngoscope for tracheal intubation by novice personnel.

Methods: We selected 37 medical students with no prior tracheal intubation experience and educated them on using both laryngoscopes. Seventy-four patients were randomly divided into two groups (group A: AOL, group M: Macintosh laryngoscope). We recorded the tracheal intubation success rate, intubation time, number of attempts, intubation difficulty scale, and adverse effects.

Results: The total success rate was similar in the two groups, but the success rate at first attempt was higher in group A (P < 0.01). Group A also showed reduced duration and attempts at intubation, as well as adverse effects such as oral cavity injury. Additionally, participant reports indicated that using the AOL was easier than the Macintosh laryngoscope (P < 0.01).

Conclusions: The AOL is a more effective instrument for tracheal intubation than Macintosh laryngoscope when used by novice personnel.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus