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Idiopathic choroidal neovascular membrane in a young female.

Waheeb SA, Showail MJ - Oman J Ophthalmol (2009)

Bottom Line: A case of idiopathic choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM) is described in a 17-year-old female patient.Intravitreal bevacizumab was injected into OS, and at a five-week follow-up visit, visual acuity improved to 20/100 OS.This case is unusual, in that the CNVM developed in a young lady with no significant past medical history and with the absence of a choroidal or retinal pigment epithelial disease process that may be associated with a CNVM.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
A case of idiopathic choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM) is described in a 17-year-old female patient. On initial examination her vision was counting fingers at one meter in the left eye (OS) and Fluorescein angiography showed a well-defined hyperfluorescent area corresponding to the CNVM. Intravitreal bevacizumab was injected into OS, and at a five-week follow-up visit, visual acuity improved to 20/100 OS. This case is unusual, in that the CNVM developed in a young lady with no significant past medical history and with the absence of a choroidal or retinal pigment epithelial disease process that may be associated with a CNVM.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Left eye five weeks after single intravitreal bevacizumab injection. (A) Color fundus photograph shows disappearance of subretinal blood, (B) transverse OCT shows marked reduction in the intraretinal fluids, (C) fundus fluorescein angiogram, early phase shows contraction of the membrane and fluorescein dye staining of the CNV scar and (D) late phase show no further leakage
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Figure 0002: Left eye five weeks after single intravitreal bevacizumab injection. (A) Color fundus photograph shows disappearance of subretinal blood, (B) transverse OCT shows marked reduction in the intraretinal fluids, (C) fundus fluorescein angiogram, early phase shows contraction of the membrane and fluorescein dye staining of the CNV scar and (D) late phase show no further leakage

Mentions: A 17-year-old high school female student was referred for evaluation of decreasing vision in her left eye (OS). There was no history of pain, redness or photophobia. There was no history of trauma. Past medical history was unremarkable. On examination, her best corrected visual acuity in the right eye (OD) was 20/20 and counting fingers at one meter OS. Her anterior segments were normal in both eyes (OU). On biomicroscopy of the posterior segments, subfoveal choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM) with subretinal hemorrhage was noted OS [Figure 1A]. Fundus examination OD was unremarkable. No drusen, retinal pigment epithelial changes or macular exudates were observed OU. Fluorescein angiography [Figure 1C and D] showed a well-defined hyperfluorescent area corresponding to the CNVM OS with diffuse leakage on the late phase. Full blood investigations including serology were done to rule out any inflammatory pathology, and were normal. Chest X-ray was normal as well. After obtaining an informed consent, the left eye was anesthetized using topical benoxinate Hydrochloride 0.4%, then Intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin; Genentech, Inc, South San Francisco, California) was injected into OS supratemporally 3.5 mm posterior to the limbus. At the five-week follow-up visit, visual acuity improved to 20/100 OS with marked reduction of fluid in optical coherence tomography scan (OCT) [Figure 2B]. Repeat fluorescein angiography showed contraction of the membrane and no further leakage in the late phase [Figure 2C and D]. The patient remains under follow-up


Idiopathic choroidal neovascular membrane in a young female.

Waheeb SA, Showail MJ - Oman J Ophthalmol (2009)

Left eye five weeks after single intravitreal bevacizumab injection. (A) Color fundus photograph shows disappearance of subretinal blood, (B) transverse OCT shows marked reduction in the intraretinal fluids, (C) fundus fluorescein angiogram, early phase shows contraction of the membrane and fluorescein dye staining of the CNV scar and (D) late phase show no further leakage
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2903919&req=5

Figure 0002: Left eye five weeks after single intravitreal bevacizumab injection. (A) Color fundus photograph shows disappearance of subretinal blood, (B) transverse OCT shows marked reduction in the intraretinal fluids, (C) fundus fluorescein angiogram, early phase shows contraction of the membrane and fluorescein dye staining of the CNV scar and (D) late phase show no further leakage
Mentions: A 17-year-old high school female student was referred for evaluation of decreasing vision in her left eye (OS). There was no history of pain, redness or photophobia. There was no history of trauma. Past medical history was unremarkable. On examination, her best corrected visual acuity in the right eye (OD) was 20/20 and counting fingers at one meter OS. Her anterior segments were normal in both eyes (OU). On biomicroscopy of the posterior segments, subfoveal choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM) with subretinal hemorrhage was noted OS [Figure 1A]. Fundus examination OD was unremarkable. No drusen, retinal pigment epithelial changes or macular exudates were observed OU. Fluorescein angiography [Figure 1C and D] showed a well-defined hyperfluorescent area corresponding to the CNVM OS with diffuse leakage on the late phase. Full blood investigations including serology were done to rule out any inflammatory pathology, and were normal. Chest X-ray was normal as well. After obtaining an informed consent, the left eye was anesthetized using topical benoxinate Hydrochloride 0.4%, then Intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin; Genentech, Inc, South San Francisco, California) was injected into OS supratemporally 3.5 mm posterior to the limbus. At the five-week follow-up visit, visual acuity improved to 20/100 OS with marked reduction of fluid in optical coherence tomography scan (OCT) [Figure 2B]. Repeat fluorescein angiography showed contraction of the membrane and no further leakage in the late phase [Figure 2C and D]. The patient remains under follow-up

Bottom Line: A case of idiopathic choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM) is described in a 17-year-old female patient.Intravitreal bevacizumab was injected into OS, and at a five-week follow-up visit, visual acuity improved to 20/100 OS.This case is unusual, in that the CNVM developed in a young lady with no significant past medical history and with the absence of a choroidal or retinal pigment epithelial disease process that may be associated with a CNVM.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
A case of idiopathic choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM) is described in a 17-year-old female patient. On initial examination her vision was counting fingers at one meter in the left eye (OS) and Fluorescein angiography showed a well-defined hyperfluorescent area corresponding to the CNVM. Intravitreal bevacizumab was injected into OS, and at a five-week follow-up visit, visual acuity improved to 20/100 OS. This case is unusual, in that the CNVM developed in a young lady with no significant past medical history and with the absence of a choroidal or retinal pigment epithelial disease process that may be associated with a CNVM.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus