Limits...
Combined autologous and allograft limbal cell transplantation with penetrating keratoplasty in a case of chemical corneal burn patient.

Mitra S - Oman J Ophthalmol (2009)

Bottom Line: The autologous and allograft limbal tissue included peripheral cornea, limbus and conjunctiva obtained from contralateral eye and cadaveric eye bank cornea.Central corneal button was used for a PKP with 32 intermittent sutures.Eighteen sutures are still in place; no vascularization has extended beyond the host graft junction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Al-Zahra Private Hospital, Sharjah, UAE.

ABSTRACT
A patient with chemical corneal burn presented two months after the acute episode of chemical injury to his right eye (OD) and was diagnosed with severe limbal stem cell deficiency and with vascularized corneal opacity OD. Limbal cell transplantation and penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) was performed. The autologous and allograft limbal tissue included peripheral cornea, limbus and conjunctiva obtained from contralateral eye and cadaveric eye bank cornea. Central corneal button was used for a PKP with 32 intermittent sutures. One year after the procedure, the corneal surface remains clear with a best corrected visual acuity of 6/12 (-2.00 DS / -2.75 DC-/ 150°. Eighteen sutures are still in place; no vascularization has extended beyond the host graft junction. Ocular surface is wetting well with no filamentary keratitis.Combined autologous and allograft limbal cell transplant can be performed for severe deficiency of corneal stem cells in a patient with chemical corneal burn.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

At two weeks follow-up, Cobalt blue light examination reveals almost 90% epithelial healing with small epithelial defect at three o′ clock, staining with fluorescein (double white arrows) and two loose sutures at six o′ clock (single white arrow).
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Figure 0003: At two weeks follow-up, Cobalt blue light examination reveals almost 90% epithelial healing with small epithelial defect at three o′ clock, staining with fluorescein (double white arrows) and two loose sutures at six o′ clock (single white arrow).

Mentions: No intraoperative complications occurred. Postoperatively, the limbal graft showed epithelial outgrowths within the first two days and almost 90% corneal surface was completely epithelialized within two weeks [Figure 3]. There was no infection, limbal graft failure or slippage of tissue. The epithelium was stable, without recurrences of epithelial defects, or corneal neovascularization. The vision improved to 6/36 unaided and 6/12 with glasses (-2.00 DS/ -2.75 DC × 150°) by six months. At the final postoperative visit, 18 sutures were in place. No vascularization was observed beyond the host graft junction [Figure 4]. The mean IOP remained normal at 16 mm Hg. No cataract has been observed. Ocular surface was wetting well with no filamentary keratitis.


Combined autologous and allograft limbal cell transplantation with penetrating keratoplasty in a case of chemical corneal burn patient.

Mitra S - Oman J Ophthalmol (2009)

At two weeks follow-up, Cobalt blue light examination reveals almost 90% epithelial healing with small epithelial defect at three o′ clock, staining with fluorescein (double white arrows) and two loose sutures at six o′ clock (single white arrow).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2903917&req=5

Figure 0003: At two weeks follow-up, Cobalt blue light examination reveals almost 90% epithelial healing with small epithelial defect at three o′ clock, staining with fluorescein (double white arrows) and two loose sutures at six o′ clock (single white arrow).
Mentions: No intraoperative complications occurred. Postoperatively, the limbal graft showed epithelial outgrowths within the first two days and almost 90% corneal surface was completely epithelialized within two weeks [Figure 3]. There was no infection, limbal graft failure or slippage of tissue. The epithelium was stable, without recurrences of epithelial defects, or corneal neovascularization. The vision improved to 6/36 unaided and 6/12 with glasses (-2.00 DS/ -2.75 DC × 150°) by six months. At the final postoperative visit, 18 sutures were in place. No vascularization was observed beyond the host graft junction [Figure 4]. The mean IOP remained normal at 16 mm Hg. No cataract has been observed. Ocular surface was wetting well with no filamentary keratitis.

Bottom Line: The autologous and allograft limbal tissue included peripheral cornea, limbus and conjunctiva obtained from contralateral eye and cadaveric eye bank cornea.Central corneal button was used for a PKP with 32 intermittent sutures.Eighteen sutures are still in place; no vascularization has extended beyond the host graft junction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Al-Zahra Private Hospital, Sharjah, UAE.

ABSTRACT
A patient with chemical corneal burn presented two months after the acute episode of chemical injury to his right eye (OD) and was diagnosed with severe limbal stem cell deficiency and with vascularized corneal opacity OD. Limbal cell transplantation and penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) was performed. The autologous and allograft limbal tissue included peripheral cornea, limbus and conjunctiva obtained from contralateral eye and cadaveric eye bank cornea. Central corneal button was used for a PKP with 32 intermittent sutures. One year after the procedure, the corneal surface remains clear with a best corrected visual acuity of 6/12 (-2.00 DS / -2.75 DC-/ 150°. Eighteen sutures are still in place; no vascularization has extended beyond the host graft junction. Ocular surface is wetting well with no filamentary keratitis.Combined autologous and allograft limbal cell transplant can be performed for severe deficiency of corneal stem cells in a patient with chemical corneal burn.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus