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Cutaneous lesions of the nose.

Sand M, Sand D, Thrandorf C, Paech V, Altmeyer P, Bechara FG - Head Face Med (2010)

Bottom Line: Skin diseases on the nose are seen in a variety of medical disciplines.Dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners and general plastic and dermatologic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the nose.This article is the second part of a review series dealing with cutaneous lesions on the head and face, which are frequently seen in daily practice by a dermatologic surgeon.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Dermatologic Surgery Unit, Ruhr-University Bochum, Gudrunstr 56, 44791 Bochum, Germany. michael.sand@ruhr-uni-bochum.de

ABSTRACT
Skin diseases on the nose are seen in a variety of medical disciplines. Dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners and general plastic and dermatologic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the nose. This article is the second part of a review series dealing with cutaneous lesions on the head and face, which are frequently seen in daily practice by a dermatologic surgeon. In this review, we focus on those skin diseases on the nose where surgery or laser therapy is considered a possible treatment option or that can be surgically evaluated.

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Rosacea. Erythema and telangiectasia are seen over the cheeks, nasolabial area and nose. Inflammatory papules and pustules can be observed over the nose. The absence of comedos is a helpful tool to distinguish rosacea from acne.
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Figure 9: Rosacea. Erythema and telangiectasia are seen over the cheeks, nasolabial area and nose. Inflammatory papules and pustules can be observed over the nose. The absence of comedos is a helpful tool to distinguish rosacea from acne.

Mentions: Rosacea is a multiphasic inflammatory condition that typically affects the skin of the face and nose. Clinically, rosacea has been classified in four different stages. Stage I, also called rosacea erythematosa telangiectasia (pre-rosacea), shows facial flushing and telangiectasia. Stage II, rosacea papulopustulosa (vascular rosacea), is characterized by persistent facial erythema, telangiectasia, thickened skin, papules and pustules (Fig 9). Stage III, glandular-hypertrophic or inflammatory rosacea, shows erythematous papules and pustules, telangiectasias, edema, connective tissue and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Stage IV, or rhinophyma, shows dermal and sebaceous gland hyperplasia, and dilated and cystic sebaceous glands. Most individuals affected by rosacea are of northern European origin, and up to one-third have a family history of the disorder [91]. Clinical signs include facial flushing, erythema, telangiectasia and papulopustular efflorescence similar to acne as described previously. Women are three times more likely to be affected than men, with the reported prevalence between 0.5 and 10% [92,93]. The pathophysiology has been poorly understood, and there have been only limited descriptions of factors that exacerbate or improve this disease [94]. Recent molecular studies suggest that an altered innate immune response is involved in the pathogenesis of vascular and inflammatory disease and is responsible for the observed clinical findings in patients with rosacea [95].


Cutaneous lesions of the nose.

Sand M, Sand D, Thrandorf C, Paech V, Altmeyer P, Bechara FG - Head Face Med (2010)

Rosacea. Erythema and telangiectasia are seen over the cheeks, nasolabial area and nose. Inflammatory papules and pustules can be observed over the nose. The absence of comedos is a helpful tool to distinguish rosacea from acne.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2903548&req=5

Figure 9: Rosacea. Erythema and telangiectasia are seen over the cheeks, nasolabial area and nose. Inflammatory papules and pustules can be observed over the nose. The absence of comedos is a helpful tool to distinguish rosacea from acne.
Mentions: Rosacea is a multiphasic inflammatory condition that typically affects the skin of the face and nose. Clinically, rosacea has been classified in four different stages. Stage I, also called rosacea erythematosa telangiectasia (pre-rosacea), shows facial flushing and telangiectasia. Stage II, rosacea papulopustulosa (vascular rosacea), is characterized by persistent facial erythema, telangiectasia, thickened skin, papules and pustules (Fig 9). Stage III, glandular-hypertrophic or inflammatory rosacea, shows erythematous papules and pustules, telangiectasias, edema, connective tissue and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Stage IV, or rhinophyma, shows dermal and sebaceous gland hyperplasia, and dilated and cystic sebaceous glands. Most individuals affected by rosacea are of northern European origin, and up to one-third have a family history of the disorder [91]. Clinical signs include facial flushing, erythema, telangiectasia and papulopustular efflorescence similar to acne as described previously. Women are three times more likely to be affected than men, with the reported prevalence between 0.5 and 10% [92,93]. The pathophysiology has been poorly understood, and there have been only limited descriptions of factors that exacerbate or improve this disease [94]. Recent molecular studies suggest that an altered innate immune response is involved in the pathogenesis of vascular and inflammatory disease and is responsible for the observed clinical findings in patients with rosacea [95].

Bottom Line: Skin diseases on the nose are seen in a variety of medical disciplines.Dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners and general plastic and dermatologic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the nose.This article is the second part of a review series dealing with cutaneous lesions on the head and face, which are frequently seen in daily practice by a dermatologic surgeon.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Dermatologic Surgery Unit, Ruhr-University Bochum, Gudrunstr 56, 44791 Bochum, Germany. michael.sand@ruhr-uni-bochum.de

ABSTRACT
Skin diseases on the nose are seen in a variety of medical disciplines. Dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners and general plastic and dermatologic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the nose. This article is the second part of a review series dealing with cutaneous lesions on the head and face, which are frequently seen in daily practice by a dermatologic surgeon. In this review, we focus on those skin diseases on the nose where surgery or laser therapy is considered a possible treatment option or that can be surgically evaluated.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus