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Cutaneous lesions of the nose.

Sand M, Sand D, Thrandorf C, Paech V, Altmeyer P, Bechara FG - Head Face Med (2010)

Bottom Line: Skin diseases on the nose are seen in a variety of medical disciplines.Dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners and general plastic and dermatologic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the nose.This article is the second part of a review series dealing with cutaneous lesions on the head and face, which are frequently seen in daily practice by a dermatologic surgeon.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Dermatologic Surgery Unit, Ruhr-University Bochum, Gudrunstr 56, 44791 Bochum, Germany. michael.sand@ruhr-uni-bochum.de

ABSTRACT
Skin diseases on the nose are seen in a variety of medical disciplines. Dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners and general plastic and dermatologic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the nose. This article is the second part of a review series dealing with cutaneous lesions on the head and face, which are frequently seen in daily practice by a dermatologic surgeon. In this review, we focus on those skin diseases on the nose where surgery or laser therapy is considered a possible treatment option or that can be surgically evaluated.

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Infantile hemangioma. Well-circumscribed red, violet, exophytic vascular tumor on the nose of a one-year-old child.
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Figure 6: Infantile hemangioma. Well-circumscribed red, violet, exophytic vascular tumor on the nose of a one-year-old child.

Mentions: Hemangiomas are observed in 4-10% of the population and represent the most common tumor of infancy (Fig 6). Caucasians, females (3:1) and premature infants with low birth weight show a higher prevalence [64]. The head and neck are the most common locations (59%) [65]. In facial hemangiomas, 15.8% show involvement of the nose, and the nasal tip is affected in 5.1% [66]. A careful history and examination is the basis for the diagnosis of hemangiomas. Because the lesion is usually absent at birth, it proliferates starting from an erythematous macule or telangiectasia during the first days or weeks of life. The growth phase, which can either be gradual or rapid, is usually six months long and is followed by a longer involution phase of 6-12 months [67,68]. According to Waner et al., facial infantile hemangiomas occur in two distinct patterns of tissue involvement: a focal type with a tumor-like appearance and a less common diffuse type with a plaque-like appearance [69]. The diffuse lesions are more likely to be complicated by ulceration or airway obstruction and show a strikingly segmental distribution pattern compared with focal hemangiomas [66]. Ninety percent of all hemangiomas spontaneously involute prior to the age of 12. Despite this high percentage of spontaneous self-healing, there are still a variety of situations where therapy is indicated. In nasal hemangiomas on the upper third of the nose, the periorbital area is often additionally affected, which can result in impairment of the field of sight. In cases of intraorbital progression, bulbar deviation and amblyopia are dangerous side effects [70]. Nasal involvement can result in nasal deformity (Cyrano nose deformity) or the impairment of nasal breathing [71]. Therefore, treatment of hemangiomas of the nose should be started early to prevent possible complications.


Cutaneous lesions of the nose.

Sand M, Sand D, Thrandorf C, Paech V, Altmeyer P, Bechara FG - Head Face Med (2010)

Infantile hemangioma. Well-circumscribed red, violet, exophytic vascular tumor on the nose of a one-year-old child.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2903548&req=5

Figure 6: Infantile hemangioma. Well-circumscribed red, violet, exophytic vascular tumor on the nose of a one-year-old child.
Mentions: Hemangiomas are observed in 4-10% of the population and represent the most common tumor of infancy (Fig 6). Caucasians, females (3:1) and premature infants with low birth weight show a higher prevalence [64]. The head and neck are the most common locations (59%) [65]. In facial hemangiomas, 15.8% show involvement of the nose, and the nasal tip is affected in 5.1% [66]. A careful history and examination is the basis for the diagnosis of hemangiomas. Because the lesion is usually absent at birth, it proliferates starting from an erythematous macule or telangiectasia during the first days or weeks of life. The growth phase, which can either be gradual or rapid, is usually six months long and is followed by a longer involution phase of 6-12 months [67,68]. According to Waner et al., facial infantile hemangiomas occur in two distinct patterns of tissue involvement: a focal type with a tumor-like appearance and a less common diffuse type with a plaque-like appearance [69]. The diffuse lesions are more likely to be complicated by ulceration or airway obstruction and show a strikingly segmental distribution pattern compared with focal hemangiomas [66]. Ninety percent of all hemangiomas spontaneously involute prior to the age of 12. Despite this high percentage of spontaneous self-healing, there are still a variety of situations where therapy is indicated. In nasal hemangiomas on the upper third of the nose, the periorbital area is often additionally affected, which can result in impairment of the field of sight. In cases of intraorbital progression, bulbar deviation and amblyopia are dangerous side effects [70]. Nasal involvement can result in nasal deformity (Cyrano nose deformity) or the impairment of nasal breathing [71]. Therefore, treatment of hemangiomas of the nose should be started early to prevent possible complications.

Bottom Line: Skin diseases on the nose are seen in a variety of medical disciplines.Dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners and general plastic and dermatologic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the nose.This article is the second part of a review series dealing with cutaneous lesions on the head and face, which are frequently seen in daily practice by a dermatologic surgeon.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Dermatologic Surgery Unit, Ruhr-University Bochum, Gudrunstr 56, 44791 Bochum, Germany. michael.sand@ruhr-uni-bochum.de

ABSTRACT
Skin diseases on the nose are seen in a variety of medical disciplines. Dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners and general plastic and dermatologic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the nose. This article is the second part of a review series dealing with cutaneous lesions on the head and face, which are frequently seen in daily practice by a dermatologic surgeon. In this review, we focus on those skin diseases on the nose where surgery or laser therapy is considered a possible treatment option or that can be surgically evaluated.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus