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Cutaneous lesions of the nose.

Sand M, Sand D, Thrandorf C, Paech V, Altmeyer P, Bechara FG - Head Face Med (2010)

Bottom Line: Skin diseases on the nose are seen in a variety of medical disciplines.Dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners and general plastic and dermatologic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the nose.This article is the second part of a review series dealing with cutaneous lesions on the head and face, which are frequently seen in daily practice by a dermatologic surgeon.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Dermatologic Surgery Unit, Ruhr-University Bochum, Gudrunstr 56, 44791 Bochum, Germany. michael.sand@ruhr-uni-bochum.de

ABSTRACT
Skin diseases on the nose are seen in a variety of medical disciplines. Dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners and general plastic and dermatologic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the nose. This article is the second part of a review series dealing with cutaneous lesions on the head and face, which are frequently seen in daily practice by a dermatologic surgeon. In this review, we focus on those skin diseases on the nose where surgery or laser therapy is considered a possible treatment option or that can be surgically evaluated.

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Rhinophyma. Large exophytic, pink, lobulated mass over the nose with superficial vascular dilation. The lesion is spreading to the cheeks; however, it can also be limited to the nose.
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Figure 5: Rhinophyma. Large exophytic, pink, lobulated mass over the nose with superficial vascular dilation. The lesion is spreading to the cheeks; however, it can also be limited to the nose.

Mentions: Rhinophyma is a slow-growing and possibly disfiguring tumor of the nose that primarily affects men in their fifth to seventh decade [49] (Fig. 5). It is characterized by the progressive enlargement of the nose caused by sebaceous hyperplasia, follicular plugging, fibrosis and telangiectasia [50]. Although it is currently classified as stage IV rosacea, some authors believe it represents a different disease process [51]. In the past, rhinophyma has often been associated with heavy alcohol consumption, but new studies have shown that there is no significant correlation [52]. The absence of rosacea skin lesions at adjacent skin areas may be the sign of a tumor mimicking rhinophyma. Although rare, sebaceous carcinomas and angiosarcomas, as well as the more common BCCs and SCCs, are sometimes concomitantly present [53-56]. In rare cases, lupoid cutaneous leishmaniasis can also present as rhinophyma. The removal of excessive tissue can be achieved by dermabrasion, excisional surgery by cold steel, cryosurgery, electrocautery decortication and/or CO2 laser ablation [57]. Regardless of the method employed, it is important to respect the delicate anatomy of the nose. The follicular epithelium is the starting point of the re-epithelialization of the wound surface and should not be ablated during rhinophyma surgery [58]. Furthermore, injuries, particularly to the perichondrium of the cartilaginous skeleton of the nose, need to be avoided under all circumstances to prevent nasal flaring.


Cutaneous lesions of the nose.

Sand M, Sand D, Thrandorf C, Paech V, Altmeyer P, Bechara FG - Head Face Med (2010)

Rhinophyma. Large exophytic, pink, lobulated mass over the nose with superficial vascular dilation. The lesion is spreading to the cheeks; however, it can also be limited to the nose.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2903548&req=5

Figure 5: Rhinophyma. Large exophytic, pink, lobulated mass over the nose with superficial vascular dilation. The lesion is spreading to the cheeks; however, it can also be limited to the nose.
Mentions: Rhinophyma is a slow-growing and possibly disfiguring tumor of the nose that primarily affects men in their fifth to seventh decade [49] (Fig. 5). It is characterized by the progressive enlargement of the nose caused by sebaceous hyperplasia, follicular plugging, fibrosis and telangiectasia [50]. Although it is currently classified as stage IV rosacea, some authors believe it represents a different disease process [51]. In the past, rhinophyma has often been associated with heavy alcohol consumption, but new studies have shown that there is no significant correlation [52]. The absence of rosacea skin lesions at adjacent skin areas may be the sign of a tumor mimicking rhinophyma. Although rare, sebaceous carcinomas and angiosarcomas, as well as the more common BCCs and SCCs, are sometimes concomitantly present [53-56]. In rare cases, lupoid cutaneous leishmaniasis can also present as rhinophyma. The removal of excessive tissue can be achieved by dermabrasion, excisional surgery by cold steel, cryosurgery, electrocautery decortication and/or CO2 laser ablation [57]. Regardless of the method employed, it is important to respect the delicate anatomy of the nose. The follicular epithelium is the starting point of the re-epithelialization of the wound surface and should not be ablated during rhinophyma surgery [58]. Furthermore, injuries, particularly to the perichondrium of the cartilaginous skeleton of the nose, need to be avoided under all circumstances to prevent nasal flaring.

Bottom Line: Skin diseases on the nose are seen in a variety of medical disciplines.Dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners and general plastic and dermatologic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the nose.This article is the second part of a review series dealing with cutaneous lesions on the head and face, which are frequently seen in daily practice by a dermatologic surgeon.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Dermatologic Surgery Unit, Ruhr-University Bochum, Gudrunstr 56, 44791 Bochum, Germany. michael.sand@ruhr-uni-bochum.de

ABSTRACT
Skin diseases on the nose are seen in a variety of medical disciplines. Dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners and general plastic and dermatologic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the nose. This article is the second part of a review series dealing with cutaneous lesions on the head and face, which are frequently seen in daily practice by a dermatologic surgeon. In this review, we focus on those skin diseases on the nose where surgery or laser therapy is considered a possible treatment option or that can be surgically evaluated.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus