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Cancer malignancy is enhanced by glyceraldehyde-derived advanced glycation end-products.

Takino J, Yamagishi S, Takeuchi M - J Oncol (2010)

Bottom Line: A recent study has suggested that glyceraldehyde-derived AGEs (Glycer-AGEs) enhanced the malignancy of melanoma cells, but glucose-derived AGEs did not.The present paper aimed to examine the effect of Glycer-AGEs on cultured lung cancer A549 cells.Glycer-AGEs significantly attenuated cell proliferation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokuriku University, Ho-3 Kanagawa-machi, Kanazawa 920-1181, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGEs) is associated with the malignancy of cancer. A recent study has suggested that glyceraldehyde-derived AGEs (Glycer-AGEs) enhanced the malignancy of melanoma cells, but glucose-derived AGEs did not. However, the effects of Glycer-AGEs on other cancer cells remain poorly understood, and the molecular mechanisms behind the above-mentioned effect have not been clarified. The present paper aimed to examine the effect of Glycer-AGEs on cultured lung cancer A549 cells. RAGE was expressed in A549 cells. Glycer-AGEs significantly attenuated cell proliferation. Furthermore, Glycer-AGEs enhanced the migration capacity of the cells by activating Rac1 via ROS and also increased their invasion capacity. We demonstrated that Glycer-AGEs enhanced the migration and invasion of A549 cells rather than their proliferation. These results suggest that Glycer-AGEs play a critical role in the malignancy of cancer rather than its proliferation and are potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The migration and invasion capacities of A549 cells were evaluated in transwell chambers and Matrigel invasion chambers, respectively. The cells were incubated with control unglycated BSA or Glycer-AGEs for 20 h (a) or 48 h (b). The nonmigrating or non-invading cells remaining above the chamber membrane were removed with cotton swabs. The cells that migrated to or invaded the opposite side of the chamber membrane were counted. (a) Migration assay. (b) Invasion assay. Data are shown as the mean ± SD (n = 3) *P < .05, **P < .01 versus control unglycated BSA.
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fig3: The migration and invasion capacities of A549 cells were evaluated in transwell chambers and Matrigel invasion chambers, respectively. The cells were incubated with control unglycated BSA or Glycer-AGEs for 20 h (a) or 48 h (b). The nonmigrating or non-invading cells remaining above the chamber membrane were removed with cotton swabs. The cells that migrated to or invaded the opposite side of the chamber membrane were counted. (a) Migration assay. (b) Invasion assay. Data are shown as the mean ± SD (n = 3) *P < .05, **P < .01 versus control unglycated BSA.

Mentions: We examined the effect of Glycer-AGEs on cell migration and invasion. In the migration assay, the Glycer-AGEs-treated cells showed significantly (2.7 times higher) greater migration than the control unglycated BSA-treated cells (Figure 3(a)), and in the invasion assay, the Glycer-AGEs-treated cells showed significantly (3.3 times higher) greater invasion than the control unglycated BSA-treated cells (Figure 3(b)). When Glycer-AGEs were added to the lower chamber, there was no effect on the results of the invasion assay (data not shown). These results suggest that Glycer-AGEs-RAGE interaction is necessary for cell migration and invasion.


Cancer malignancy is enhanced by glyceraldehyde-derived advanced glycation end-products.

Takino J, Yamagishi S, Takeuchi M - J Oncol (2010)

The migration and invasion capacities of A549 cells were evaluated in transwell chambers and Matrigel invasion chambers, respectively. The cells were incubated with control unglycated BSA or Glycer-AGEs for 20 h (a) or 48 h (b). The nonmigrating or non-invading cells remaining above the chamber membrane were removed with cotton swabs. The cells that migrated to or invaded the opposite side of the chamber membrane were counted. (a) Migration assay. (b) Invasion assay. Data are shown as the mean ± SD (n = 3) *P < .05, **P < .01 versus control unglycated BSA.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2902753&req=5

fig3: The migration and invasion capacities of A549 cells were evaluated in transwell chambers and Matrigel invasion chambers, respectively. The cells were incubated with control unglycated BSA or Glycer-AGEs for 20 h (a) or 48 h (b). The nonmigrating or non-invading cells remaining above the chamber membrane were removed with cotton swabs. The cells that migrated to or invaded the opposite side of the chamber membrane were counted. (a) Migration assay. (b) Invasion assay. Data are shown as the mean ± SD (n = 3) *P < .05, **P < .01 versus control unglycated BSA.
Mentions: We examined the effect of Glycer-AGEs on cell migration and invasion. In the migration assay, the Glycer-AGEs-treated cells showed significantly (2.7 times higher) greater migration than the control unglycated BSA-treated cells (Figure 3(a)), and in the invasion assay, the Glycer-AGEs-treated cells showed significantly (3.3 times higher) greater invasion than the control unglycated BSA-treated cells (Figure 3(b)). When Glycer-AGEs were added to the lower chamber, there was no effect on the results of the invasion assay (data not shown). These results suggest that Glycer-AGEs-RAGE interaction is necessary for cell migration and invasion.

Bottom Line: A recent study has suggested that glyceraldehyde-derived AGEs (Glycer-AGEs) enhanced the malignancy of melanoma cells, but glucose-derived AGEs did not.The present paper aimed to examine the effect of Glycer-AGEs on cultured lung cancer A549 cells.Glycer-AGEs significantly attenuated cell proliferation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokuriku University, Ho-3 Kanagawa-machi, Kanazawa 920-1181, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGEs) is associated with the malignancy of cancer. A recent study has suggested that glyceraldehyde-derived AGEs (Glycer-AGEs) enhanced the malignancy of melanoma cells, but glucose-derived AGEs did not. However, the effects of Glycer-AGEs on other cancer cells remain poorly understood, and the molecular mechanisms behind the above-mentioned effect have not been clarified. The present paper aimed to examine the effect of Glycer-AGEs on cultured lung cancer A549 cells. RAGE was expressed in A549 cells. Glycer-AGEs significantly attenuated cell proliferation. Furthermore, Glycer-AGEs enhanced the migration capacity of the cells by activating Rac1 via ROS and also increased their invasion capacity. We demonstrated that Glycer-AGEs enhanced the migration and invasion of A549 cells rather than their proliferation. These results suggest that Glycer-AGEs play a critical role in the malignancy of cancer rather than its proliferation and are potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus