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Latent class analysis of antisocial behavior: interaction of serotonin transporter genotype and maltreatment.

Li JJ, Lee SS - J Abnorm Child Psychol (2010)

Bottom Line: In boys, 5-HTTLPR and maltreatment were not significantly related to ASB.However, in girls, maltreatment, but not 5-HTTLPR, was significantly associated with ASB.A significant interaction between 5-HTTLPR and maltreatment was also observed, where maltreated girls homozygous for the short allele were 12 times more likely to be classified in the Exclusive Covert group than in the No Problems group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, 1285 Franz Hall, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, USA.

ABSTRACT
To improve understanding about genetic and environmental influences on antisocial behavior (ASB), we tested the association of the 44-base pair polymorphism of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) and maltreatment using latent class analysis in 2,488 boys and girls from Wave 1 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. In boys, ASB was defined by three classes (Exclusive Covert, Mixed Covert and Overt, and No Problems) whereas in girls, ASB was defined by two classes (Exclusive Covert, No Problems). In boys, 5-HTTLPR and maltreatment were not significantly related to ASB. However, in girls, maltreatment, but not 5-HTTLPR, was significantly associated with ASB. A significant interaction between 5-HTTLPR and maltreatment was also observed, where maltreated girls homozygous for the short allele were 12 times more likely to be classified in the Exclusive Covert group than in the No Problems group. Structural differences in the latent structure of ASB at Wave 2 and Wave 3 prevented repeat LCA modeling. However, using counts of ASB, 5-HTTLPR, maltreatment, and its interaction were unrelated to overt and covert ASB at Wave 2 and only maltreatment was related to covert ASB at Wave 3. We discuss these findings within the context of sex differences in ASB and relevant models of gene-environment interplay across developmental periods.

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Latent class membership probabilities for girls
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Fig1: Latent class membership probabilities for girls

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the prevalence of group membership and probabilities for girls. Class 1, which accounted for 91% of girls, was characterized by low probabilities for ASB (No Problems). However, 8.8% of girls fell into Class 2 (Exclusive Covert), characterized by significantly higher probabilities for endorsing covert forms of ASB [vandalism (0.79), breaking and entering (0.45), and selling marijuana (0.28)] but low probabilities for overt ASB [pulling a knife or gun on someone (0.10) and shooting or stabbing someone (0.04)]. Unlike boys, there was no evidence of a third class for girls (e.g., mixed covert and overt).Fig. 1


Latent class analysis of antisocial behavior: interaction of serotonin transporter genotype and maltreatment.

Li JJ, Lee SS - J Abnorm Child Psychol (2010)

Latent class membership probabilities for girls
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2902744&req=5

Fig1: Latent class membership probabilities for girls
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the prevalence of group membership and probabilities for girls. Class 1, which accounted for 91% of girls, was characterized by low probabilities for ASB (No Problems). However, 8.8% of girls fell into Class 2 (Exclusive Covert), characterized by significantly higher probabilities for endorsing covert forms of ASB [vandalism (0.79), breaking and entering (0.45), and selling marijuana (0.28)] but low probabilities for overt ASB [pulling a knife or gun on someone (0.10) and shooting or stabbing someone (0.04)]. Unlike boys, there was no evidence of a third class for girls (e.g., mixed covert and overt).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: In boys, 5-HTTLPR and maltreatment were not significantly related to ASB.However, in girls, maltreatment, but not 5-HTTLPR, was significantly associated with ASB.A significant interaction between 5-HTTLPR and maltreatment was also observed, where maltreated girls homozygous for the short allele were 12 times more likely to be classified in the Exclusive Covert group than in the No Problems group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, 1285 Franz Hall, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, USA.

ABSTRACT
To improve understanding about genetic and environmental influences on antisocial behavior (ASB), we tested the association of the 44-base pair polymorphism of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) and maltreatment using latent class analysis in 2,488 boys and girls from Wave 1 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. In boys, ASB was defined by three classes (Exclusive Covert, Mixed Covert and Overt, and No Problems) whereas in girls, ASB was defined by two classes (Exclusive Covert, No Problems). In boys, 5-HTTLPR and maltreatment were not significantly related to ASB. However, in girls, maltreatment, but not 5-HTTLPR, was significantly associated with ASB. A significant interaction between 5-HTTLPR and maltreatment was also observed, where maltreated girls homozygous for the short allele were 12 times more likely to be classified in the Exclusive Covert group than in the No Problems group. Structural differences in the latent structure of ASB at Wave 2 and Wave 3 prevented repeat LCA modeling. However, using counts of ASB, 5-HTTLPR, maltreatment, and its interaction were unrelated to overt and covert ASB at Wave 2 and only maltreatment was related to covert ASB at Wave 3. We discuss these findings within the context of sex differences in ASB and relevant models of gene-environment interplay across developmental periods.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus