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Timing of subsequent fractures after an initial fracture.

van Geel TA, Huntjens KM, van den Bergh JP, Dinant GJ, Geusens PP - Curr Osteoporos Rep (2010)

Bottom Line: These studies show that the subsequent fracture risk is not constant, but fluctuates over time.The risk of subsequent vertebral, hip, and nonvertebral non-hip fractures is highest immediately after initial hip, clinical, and radiographic vertebral fractures and nonvertebral fractures and declines afterward, regardless of gender, age, and initial fracture location.These studies indicate the need for early action after an initial fracture with medical interventions that have an effect within a short term to reduce the preventable risks of subsequent fractures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Practice, Maastricht University/Caphri, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands. t.vangeel@hag.unimaas.nl

ABSTRACT
A prior fracture is a well-documented risk factor for a subsequent fracture and it doubles the risk of subsequent fractures. Few studies have investigated the time that elapses between the initial and subsequent fracture. These studies show that the subsequent fracture risk is not constant, but fluctuates over time. The risk of subsequent vertebral, hip, and nonvertebral non-hip fractures is highest immediately after initial hip, clinical, and radiographic vertebral fractures and nonvertebral fractures and declines afterward, regardless of gender, age, and initial fracture location. These studies indicate the need for early action after an initial fracture with medical interventions that have an effect within a short term to reduce the preventable risks of subsequent fractures.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

One-year absolute risk (AR) for repeat radiographic vertebral fractures (VFs)
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Fig1: One-year absolute risk (AR) for repeat radiographic vertebral fractures (VFs)

Mentions: The cumulative incidence of new radiographic vertebral fractures in the first year of the study follow-up (ie, the AR for new radiographic vertebral fractures in patients with and without previous radiographic vertebral fracture of unknown timing) was 6.6% in the total group (Fig. 1) [8].Fig. 1


Timing of subsequent fractures after an initial fracture.

van Geel TA, Huntjens KM, van den Bergh JP, Dinant GJ, Geusens PP - Curr Osteoporos Rep (2010)

One-year absolute risk (AR) for repeat radiographic vertebral fractures (VFs)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2902743&req=5

Fig1: One-year absolute risk (AR) for repeat radiographic vertebral fractures (VFs)
Mentions: The cumulative incidence of new radiographic vertebral fractures in the first year of the study follow-up (ie, the AR for new radiographic vertebral fractures in patients with and without previous radiographic vertebral fracture of unknown timing) was 6.6% in the total group (Fig. 1) [8].Fig. 1

Bottom Line: These studies show that the subsequent fracture risk is not constant, but fluctuates over time.The risk of subsequent vertebral, hip, and nonvertebral non-hip fractures is highest immediately after initial hip, clinical, and radiographic vertebral fractures and nonvertebral fractures and declines afterward, regardless of gender, age, and initial fracture location.These studies indicate the need for early action after an initial fracture with medical interventions that have an effect within a short term to reduce the preventable risks of subsequent fractures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Practice, Maastricht University/Caphri, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands. t.vangeel@hag.unimaas.nl

ABSTRACT
A prior fracture is a well-documented risk factor for a subsequent fracture and it doubles the risk of subsequent fractures. Few studies have investigated the time that elapses between the initial and subsequent fracture. These studies show that the subsequent fracture risk is not constant, but fluctuates over time. The risk of subsequent vertebral, hip, and nonvertebral non-hip fractures is highest immediately after initial hip, clinical, and radiographic vertebral fractures and nonvertebral fractures and declines afterward, regardless of gender, age, and initial fracture location. These studies indicate the need for early action after an initial fracture with medical interventions that have an effect within a short term to reduce the preventable risks of subsequent fractures.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus