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Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Aspirin and Ibuprofen, Inhibit MHC-restricted Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells.

Kim HJ, Lee YH, Im SA, Kim K, Lee CK - Immune Netw (2010)

Bottom Line: In addition, the DCs generated in the presence of low concentrations of the drugs exhibit a profoundly suppressed capability to present MHC-restricted antigens.Aspirin and ibuprofen did not inhibit the phagocytic activity of DCs, the expression level of total MHC molecules and co-stimulatory molecules on DCs.These results demonstrate that aspirin and ibuprofen inhibit the intracellular processing event of the phagocytosed antigen, and further suggest that prolonged administration of NSAIDs in high doses may impair the capability of DCs to present antigens in asiociation with MHC molecules.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used to relieve pain, reduce fever and inhibit inflammation. NSAIDs function mainly through inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX). Growing evidence suggests that NSAIDs also have immunomodulatory effects on T and B cells. Here we examined the effects of NSAIDs on the antigen presenting function of dendritic cells (DCs).

Methods: DCs were cultured in the presence of aspirin or ibuprofen, and then allowed to phagocytose biodegradable microspheres containing ovalbumin (OVA). After washing and fixing, the efficacy of OVA peptide presentation by DCs was evaluated using OVA-specific CD8 and CD4 T cells.

Results: Aspirin and ibuprofen at high concentrations inhibited both MHC class I and class II-restricted presentation of OVA in DCs. In addition, the DCs generated in the presence of low concentrations of the drugs exhibit a profoundly suppressed capability to present MHC-restricted antigens. Aspirin and ibuprofen did not inhibit the phagocytic activity of DCs, the expression level of total MHC molecules and co-stimulatory molecules on DCs. Ibuprofen rather increased the expression level of total MHC molecules and co-stimulatory molecules on DCs.

Conclusion: These results demonstrate that aspirin and ibuprofen inhibit the intracellular processing event of the phagocytosed antigen, and further suggest that prolonged administration of NSAIDs in high doses may impair the capability of DCs to present antigens in asiociation with MHC molecules.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effects of aspirin and ibuprofen on the phagocytic activity. DC2.4 cells were cultured with aspirin or ibuprofen for 18 h, and then added with microspheres containing both OVA and FITC. After 2 h incubation, unphagocytized microspheres were washed, and the cells were harvested by gentle pipetting, and then analyzed by flow cytometry. Shaded histograms represent the phagocytic activity of DCs cultured in the presence of aspirin or ibuprofen, and thick line histograms represent the phagocytic activity of DCs cultured in the absence of the drugs. DCs that were not incubated with FITC-labeled microspheres are shown as thin line histograms (left).
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Figure 4: Effects of aspirin and ibuprofen on the phagocytic activity. DC2.4 cells were cultured with aspirin or ibuprofen for 18 h, and then added with microspheres containing both OVA and FITC. After 2 h incubation, unphagocytized microspheres were washed, and the cells were harvested by gentle pipetting, and then analyzed by flow cytometry. Shaded histograms represent the phagocytic activity of DCs cultured in the presence of aspirin or ibuprofen, and thick line histograms represent the phagocytic activity of DCs cultured in the absence of the drugs. DCs that were not incubated with FITC-labeled microspheres are shown as thin line histograms (left).

Mentions: To examine whether the suppressed capacity of aspirin or ibuprofen-treated DCs to present OVA peptides in association with MHC molecules was due to decreased phagocytic activity, DC2.4 cells were cultured with the drugs (1 mg/ml) for 18 h, and then added with microspheres containing both OVA and FITC. After 2 h incubation, unphagocytized microspheres were washed, and the cells were harvested by gentle pipetting after cooling on ice. Flow cytometric analysis of the harvested cells showed that neither of the drugs suppressed the phagocytic activity of DC2.4 cells (Fig. 4).


Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Aspirin and Ibuprofen, Inhibit MHC-restricted Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells.

Kim HJ, Lee YH, Im SA, Kim K, Lee CK - Immune Netw (2010)

Effects of aspirin and ibuprofen on the phagocytic activity. DC2.4 cells were cultured with aspirin or ibuprofen for 18 h, and then added with microspheres containing both OVA and FITC. After 2 h incubation, unphagocytized microspheres were washed, and the cells were harvested by gentle pipetting, and then analyzed by flow cytometry. Shaded histograms represent the phagocytic activity of DCs cultured in the presence of aspirin or ibuprofen, and thick line histograms represent the phagocytic activity of DCs cultured in the absence of the drugs. DCs that were not incubated with FITC-labeled microspheres are shown as thin line histograms (left).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2902675&req=5

Figure 4: Effects of aspirin and ibuprofen on the phagocytic activity. DC2.4 cells were cultured with aspirin or ibuprofen for 18 h, and then added with microspheres containing both OVA and FITC. After 2 h incubation, unphagocytized microspheres were washed, and the cells were harvested by gentle pipetting, and then analyzed by flow cytometry. Shaded histograms represent the phagocytic activity of DCs cultured in the presence of aspirin or ibuprofen, and thick line histograms represent the phagocytic activity of DCs cultured in the absence of the drugs. DCs that were not incubated with FITC-labeled microspheres are shown as thin line histograms (left).
Mentions: To examine whether the suppressed capacity of aspirin or ibuprofen-treated DCs to present OVA peptides in association with MHC molecules was due to decreased phagocytic activity, DC2.4 cells were cultured with the drugs (1 mg/ml) for 18 h, and then added with microspheres containing both OVA and FITC. After 2 h incubation, unphagocytized microspheres were washed, and the cells were harvested by gentle pipetting after cooling on ice. Flow cytometric analysis of the harvested cells showed that neither of the drugs suppressed the phagocytic activity of DC2.4 cells (Fig. 4).

Bottom Line: In addition, the DCs generated in the presence of low concentrations of the drugs exhibit a profoundly suppressed capability to present MHC-restricted antigens.Aspirin and ibuprofen did not inhibit the phagocytic activity of DCs, the expression level of total MHC molecules and co-stimulatory molecules on DCs.These results demonstrate that aspirin and ibuprofen inhibit the intracellular processing event of the phagocytosed antigen, and further suggest that prolonged administration of NSAIDs in high doses may impair the capability of DCs to present antigens in asiociation with MHC molecules.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used to relieve pain, reduce fever and inhibit inflammation. NSAIDs function mainly through inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX). Growing evidence suggests that NSAIDs also have immunomodulatory effects on T and B cells. Here we examined the effects of NSAIDs on the antigen presenting function of dendritic cells (DCs).

Methods: DCs were cultured in the presence of aspirin or ibuprofen, and then allowed to phagocytose biodegradable microspheres containing ovalbumin (OVA). After washing and fixing, the efficacy of OVA peptide presentation by DCs was evaluated using OVA-specific CD8 and CD4 T cells.

Results: Aspirin and ibuprofen at high concentrations inhibited both MHC class I and class II-restricted presentation of OVA in DCs. In addition, the DCs generated in the presence of low concentrations of the drugs exhibit a profoundly suppressed capability to present MHC-restricted antigens. Aspirin and ibuprofen did not inhibit the phagocytic activity of DCs, the expression level of total MHC molecules and co-stimulatory molecules on DCs. Ibuprofen rather increased the expression level of total MHC molecules and co-stimulatory molecules on DCs.

Conclusion: These results demonstrate that aspirin and ibuprofen inhibit the intracellular processing event of the phagocytosed antigen, and further suggest that prolonged administration of NSAIDs in high doses may impair the capability of DCs to present antigens in asiociation with MHC molecules.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus