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Photorhabdus species: bioluminescent bacteria as emerging human pathogens?

Gerrard JG, McNevin S, Alfredson D, Forgan-Smith R, Fraser N - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2003)

Bottom Line: We report two Australian patients with soft tissue infections due to Photorhabdus species.Recognized as important insect pathogens, Photorhabdus spp. are bioluminescent gram-negative bacilli.The source of infection in humans remains unknown.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Gold Coast Hospital, Southport, Queensland, Australia. jgerrard@bigpond.net.au

ABSTRACT
We report two Australian patients with soft tissue infections due to Photorhabdus species. Recognized as important insect pathogens, Photorhabdus spp. are bioluminescent gram-negative bacilli. Bacteria belonging to the genus are emerging as a cause of both localized soft tissue and disseminated infections in humans in the United States and Australia. The source of infection in humans remains unknown.

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Australian and American clinical isolates of Photorhabdus.
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Figure 3: Australian and American clinical isolates of Photorhabdus.

Mentions: Publication of information about these two cases brings to a total of 12 the number of human infections with Photorhabdus spp. documented in the medical literature (Table 2 and Figure 3). The clinical picture described in the 12 cases has generally been one of localized or more commonly multifocal skin/soft tissue infection. Such infection has had a tendency to relapse. The disseminated distribution of skin/soft tissue infection in several cases suggests hematogenous spread. Bacteremia was documented in 4/12 case-patients. Cough was documented in two of the bacteremic case-patients. In one of these, isolates of a Photorhabdus sp. were obtained from sputum as well as from blood and skin/soft tissue.


Photorhabdus species: bioluminescent bacteria as emerging human pathogens?

Gerrard JG, McNevin S, Alfredson D, Forgan-Smith R, Fraser N - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2003)

Australian and American clinical isolates of Photorhabdus.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2902266&req=5

Figure 3: Australian and American clinical isolates of Photorhabdus.
Mentions: Publication of information about these two cases brings to a total of 12 the number of human infections with Photorhabdus spp. documented in the medical literature (Table 2 and Figure 3). The clinical picture described in the 12 cases has generally been one of localized or more commonly multifocal skin/soft tissue infection. Such infection has had a tendency to relapse. The disseminated distribution of skin/soft tissue infection in several cases suggests hematogenous spread. Bacteremia was documented in 4/12 case-patients. Cough was documented in two of the bacteremic case-patients. In one of these, isolates of a Photorhabdus sp. were obtained from sputum as well as from blood and skin/soft tissue.

Bottom Line: We report two Australian patients with soft tissue infections due to Photorhabdus species.Recognized as important insect pathogens, Photorhabdus spp. are bioluminescent gram-negative bacilli.The source of infection in humans remains unknown.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Gold Coast Hospital, Southport, Queensland, Australia. jgerrard@bigpond.net.au

ABSTRACT
We report two Australian patients with soft tissue infections due to Photorhabdus species. Recognized as important insect pathogens, Photorhabdus spp. are bioluminescent gram-negative bacilli. Bacteria belonging to the genus are emerging as a cause of both localized soft tissue and disseminated infections in humans in the United States and Australia. The source of infection in humans remains unknown.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus