Limits...
Carcinoma in situ of true vocal cord in a nonsmoker adolescent female.

Mondal D, Kundu S, Chattopadhyay S, De S, Dastidar AG, Roy A - Indian J Med Paediatr Oncol (2009)

Bottom Line: A 16-year-old female patient without any of the known risk factors presented with history of gradual-onset hoarseness of voice unrelieved by symptomatic treatments for 1 year.Contrast-enhanced CT scan of neck and laryngoscopy and histopathology of the tissue from irregular lesions along the medial margin of the left vocal cord diagnosed it as a case of carcinoma in situ of vocal cord.Absence of known risk factors and very young age of the patient made this case a rarity and hence the case is being reported.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiotherapy, Medical College Hospital, Kolkata, India.

ABSTRACT
Carcinoma in situ (precancerous lesion) of true vocal cord in a nonsmoker adolescent female without any history of prior neck irradiation is rare. A 16-year-old female patient without any of the known risk factors presented with history of gradual-onset hoarseness of voice unrelieved by symptomatic treatments for 1 year. Contrast-enhanced CT scan of neck and laryngoscopy and histopathology of the tissue from irregular lesions along the medial margin of the left vocal cord diagnosed it as a case of carcinoma in situ of vocal cord. Absence of known risk factors and very young age of the patient made this case a rarity and hence the case is being reported.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CECT scan of neck showing irregular lesion along the medial margin of left vocal cord at the junction of anterior one third and posterior two thirds. There is thickening of left true vocal cord with loss of paraglottic fat, suggestive of a neoplastic lesion. The normal paraglottic fat on right side is seen as black area just deep to the thyroid cartilage (seen as white). The airway is seen as black oval structure
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2902216&req=5

Figure 0001: CECT scan of neck showing irregular lesion along the medial margin of left vocal cord at the junction of anterior one third and posterior two thirds. There is thickening of left true vocal cord with loss of paraglottic fat, suggestive of a neoplastic lesion. The normal paraglottic fat on right side is seen as black area just deep to the thyroid cartilage (seen as white). The airway is seen as black oval structure

Mentions: A 16-year-old female patient presented to the radiotherapy department in July 2008 with complaint of unrelenting hoarseness of voice for the last 1 year. She developed it gradually over a period of time. Initial treatment was directed to common cold but was of no help. There was no associated sore throat, otalgia, localized pain or tenderness over thyroid cartilage, dysphagia or features of airway obstruction. The patient is a nonsmoker and is nonalcoholic and without any history of past or present marijuana smoking. There was no history of prior neck irradiation. An incidence of cancer in the family could not be elicited from a detailed history. An indirect laryngoscopy was performed, which showed both vocal cords to be mobile. There was no visible growth over any of the vocal cords. Contrast-enhanced CT scan of the neck was performed, and it showed a small irregular lesion over the left vocal cord at the junction of anterior one third and posterior two thirds [Figure 1]. Thickening of left true vocal cord with loss of paraglottic fat is seen, suggestive of a neoplastic lesion. The normal paraglottic fat on the right side is seen as black area just deep to the thyroid cartilage (seen as white). The airway is seen as black oval structure. There is no visible neck node. Fiber-optic laryngoscopy confirmed the CT scan finding, which also showed irregular lesions along the medial margin of the left vocal cord [Figure 2]. Both CT scan and fiber-optic laryngoscopy showed an otherwise normal picture. Microlaryngoscopic removal of the mass was performed. Histopathological examination under low-power and high-power fields showed severe dysplasia and full-thickness replacement of epithelium with dysplastic cells and diagnosed it as carcinoma in situ [Figures 3 and 4]. However, the risk of a micro-invasive carcinoma could not be ruled out. A second biopsy was advised to obtain deeper tissue, but it was refused by the patient. So from the available documents, we considered it carcinoma in situ of the vocal cord.


Carcinoma in situ of true vocal cord in a nonsmoker adolescent female.

Mondal D, Kundu S, Chattopadhyay S, De S, Dastidar AG, Roy A - Indian J Med Paediatr Oncol (2009)

CECT scan of neck showing irregular lesion along the medial margin of left vocal cord at the junction of anterior one third and posterior two thirds. There is thickening of left true vocal cord with loss of paraglottic fat, suggestive of a neoplastic lesion. The normal paraglottic fat on right side is seen as black area just deep to the thyroid cartilage (seen as white). The airway is seen as black oval structure
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2902216&req=5

Figure 0001: CECT scan of neck showing irregular lesion along the medial margin of left vocal cord at the junction of anterior one third and posterior two thirds. There is thickening of left true vocal cord with loss of paraglottic fat, suggestive of a neoplastic lesion. The normal paraglottic fat on right side is seen as black area just deep to the thyroid cartilage (seen as white). The airway is seen as black oval structure
Mentions: A 16-year-old female patient presented to the radiotherapy department in July 2008 with complaint of unrelenting hoarseness of voice for the last 1 year. She developed it gradually over a period of time. Initial treatment was directed to common cold but was of no help. There was no associated sore throat, otalgia, localized pain or tenderness over thyroid cartilage, dysphagia or features of airway obstruction. The patient is a nonsmoker and is nonalcoholic and without any history of past or present marijuana smoking. There was no history of prior neck irradiation. An incidence of cancer in the family could not be elicited from a detailed history. An indirect laryngoscopy was performed, which showed both vocal cords to be mobile. There was no visible growth over any of the vocal cords. Contrast-enhanced CT scan of the neck was performed, and it showed a small irregular lesion over the left vocal cord at the junction of anterior one third and posterior two thirds [Figure 1]. Thickening of left true vocal cord with loss of paraglottic fat is seen, suggestive of a neoplastic lesion. The normal paraglottic fat on the right side is seen as black area just deep to the thyroid cartilage (seen as white). The airway is seen as black oval structure. There is no visible neck node. Fiber-optic laryngoscopy confirmed the CT scan finding, which also showed irregular lesions along the medial margin of the left vocal cord [Figure 2]. Both CT scan and fiber-optic laryngoscopy showed an otherwise normal picture. Microlaryngoscopic removal of the mass was performed. Histopathological examination under low-power and high-power fields showed severe dysplasia and full-thickness replacement of epithelium with dysplastic cells and diagnosed it as carcinoma in situ [Figures 3 and 4]. However, the risk of a micro-invasive carcinoma could not be ruled out. A second biopsy was advised to obtain deeper tissue, but it was refused by the patient. So from the available documents, we considered it carcinoma in situ of the vocal cord.

Bottom Line: A 16-year-old female patient without any of the known risk factors presented with history of gradual-onset hoarseness of voice unrelieved by symptomatic treatments for 1 year.Contrast-enhanced CT scan of neck and laryngoscopy and histopathology of the tissue from irregular lesions along the medial margin of the left vocal cord diagnosed it as a case of carcinoma in situ of vocal cord.Absence of known risk factors and very young age of the patient made this case a rarity and hence the case is being reported.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiotherapy, Medical College Hospital, Kolkata, India.

ABSTRACT
Carcinoma in situ (precancerous lesion) of true vocal cord in a nonsmoker adolescent female without any history of prior neck irradiation is rare. A 16-year-old female patient without any of the known risk factors presented with history of gradual-onset hoarseness of voice unrelieved by symptomatic treatments for 1 year. Contrast-enhanced CT scan of neck and laryngoscopy and histopathology of the tissue from irregular lesions along the medial margin of the left vocal cord diagnosed it as a case of carcinoma in situ of vocal cord. Absence of known risk factors and very young age of the patient made this case a rarity and hence the case is being reported.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus