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Radiation induced oral mucositis.

Ps SK, Balan A, Sankar A, Bose T - Indian J Palliat Care (2009)

Bottom Line: The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care.The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy.The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Government Dental College, Trivandrum, India.

ABSTRACT
PATIENTS RECEIVING RADIOTHERAPY OR CHEMOTHERAPY WILL RECEIVE SOME DEGREE OF ORAL MUCOSITIS THE INCIDENCE OF ORAL MUCOSITIS WAS ESPECIALLY HIGH IN PATIENTS: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Oral mucositis in a patient who have undergone radiotherapy
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 0001: Oral mucositis in a patient who have undergone radiotherapy

Mentions: Clinically, mucositis presents with multiple complex symptoms. It begins with a symptomatic redness and erythema and progresses through solitary white elevated desquamative patches that are slightly painful to contact pressure. Following this, large, painful contiguous pseudo membraneous lesions develop with associated dysphagia and decreased oral intake. The nonkeratinized mucosa is the most affected one. The most common sites include the labial, buccal, and soft palate mucosa, as well as, the floor of the mouth and the ventral surface of the tongue. Oral lesions usually heal within two to three weeks [Figure 1].


Radiation induced oral mucositis.

Ps SK, Balan A, Sankar A, Bose T - Indian J Palliat Care (2009)

Oral mucositis in a patient who have undergone radiotherapy
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2902123&req=5

Figure 0001: Oral mucositis in a patient who have undergone radiotherapy
Mentions: Clinically, mucositis presents with multiple complex symptoms. It begins with a symptomatic redness and erythema and progresses through solitary white elevated desquamative patches that are slightly painful to contact pressure. Following this, large, painful contiguous pseudo membraneous lesions develop with associated dysphagia and decreased oral intake. The nonkeratinized mucosa is the most affected one. The most common sites include the labial, buccal, and soft palate mucosa, as well as, the floor of the mouth and the ventral surface of the tongue. Oral lesions usually heal within two to three weeks [Figure 1].

Bottom Line: The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care.The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy.The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Government Dental College, Trivandrum, India.

ABSTRACT
PATIENTS RECEIVING RADIOTHERAPY OR CHEMOTHERAPY WILL RECEIVE SOME DEGREE OF ORAL MUCOSITIS THE INCIDENCE OF ORAL MUCOSITIS WAS ESPECIALLY HIGH IN PATIENTS: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus