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Modulatory Effect of Rice Bran and Phytic Acid on Glucose Metabolism in High Fat-Fed C57BL/6N Mice.

Kim SM, Rico CW, Lee SC, Kang MY - J Clin Biochem Nutr (2010)

Bottom Line: At the end of the experimental period, the HF group exhibited substantially higher blood glucose level than the NC group.Furthermore, significantly higher glucokinase (GK) activity and lower phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity were observed in HF-RB and HF-PA mice compared with that of the NC and HF ones.These findings demonstrate that both rice bran and phytic acid could reduce the risk of high fat diet-induced hyperglycemia via regulation of hepatic glucose-regulating enzyme activities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
The effect of dietary feeding of rice bran and phytic acid on the glucose metabolism in high fat-fed C57BL/6N mice fed was investigated. The mice were given with either a high fat diet only (HF group) or a high fat diet supplemented with rice bran (HF-RB group) or phytic acid (HF-PA group) for 7 weeks. The control mice (NC group) received a normal diet. At the end of the experimental period, the HF group exhibited substantially higher blood glucose level than the NC group. However, the HF-RB and HF-PA groups showed a marked decrease in the blood glucose level relative to HF mice. Furthermore, significantly higher glucokinase (GK) activity and lower phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity were observed in HF-RB and HF-PA mice compared with that of the NC and HF ones. It was also found that the glucose-6-phosphatase (G6pase) activity and hepatic glycogen concentration were considerably higher in HF-RB and HF-PA groups, respectively, than that of the HF mice. These findings demonstrate that both rice bran and phytic acid could reduce the risk of high fat diet-induced hyperglycemia via regulation of hepatic glucose-regulating enzyme activities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of rice bran and phytic acid supplementation on the blood glucose level in high fat fed-mice. Means not sharing a common superscript are significantly different at p<0.05 (n = 8). NC, normal diet; HF, high fat diet; HF-RB, high fat diet + rice bran; HF-PA, high fat diet + phytic acid.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: Effect of rice bran and phytic acid supplementation on the blood glucose level in high fat fed-mice. Means not sharing a common superscript are significantly different at p<0.05 (n = 8). NC, normal diet; HF, high fat diet; HF-RB, high fat diet + rice bran; HF-PA, high fat diet + phytic acid.

Mentions: The initial blood glucose levels in mice prior to feeding with experimental diets did not significantly differ among the groups (Fig. 1). However, high-fat feeding resulted in a marked increase in the glucose level of mice after 3 and 7 weeks. On the final week, the HF-RB and HF-PA mice exhibited substantially lower glucose level compared with the HF group.


Modulatory Effect of Rice Bran and Phytic Acid on Glucose Metabolism in High Fat-Fed C57BL/6N Mice.

Kim SM, Rico CW, Lee SC, Kang MY - J Clin Biochem Nutr (2010)

Effect of rice bran and phytic acid supplementation on the blood glucose level in high fat fed-mice. Means not sharing a common superscript are significantly different at p<0.05 (n = 8). NC, normal diet; HF, high fat diet; HF-RB, high fat diet + rice bran; HF-PA, high fat diet + phytic acid.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2901758&req=5

Figure 1: Effect of rice bran and phytic acid supplementation on the blood glucose level in high fat fed-mice. Means not sharing a common superscript are significantly different at p<0.05 (n = 8). NC, normal diet; HF, high fat diet; HF-RB, high fat diet + rice bran; HF-PA, high fat diet + phytic acid.
Mentions: The initial blood glucose levels in mice prior to feeding with experimental diets did not significantly differ among the groups (Fig. 1). However, high-fat feeding resulted in a marked increase in the glucose level of mice after 3 and 7 weeks. On the final week, the HF-RB and HF-PA mice exhibited substantially lower glucose level compared with the HF group.

Bottom Line: At the end of the experimental period, the HF group exhibited substantially higher blood glucose level than the NC group.Furthermore, significantly higher glucokinase (GK) activity and lower phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity were observed in HF-RB and HF-PA mice compared with that of the NC and HF ones.These findings demonstrate that both rice bran and phytic acid could reduce the risk of high fat diet-induced hyperglycemia via regulation of hepatic glucose-regulating enzyme activities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
The effect of dietary feeding of rice bran and phytic acid on the glucose metabolism in high fat-fed C57BL/6N mice fed was investigated. The mice were given with either a high fat diet only (HF group) or a high fat diet supplemented with rice bran (HF-RB group) or phytic acid (HF-PA group) for 7 weeks. The control mice (NC group) received a normal diet. At the end of the experimental period, the HF group exhibited substantially higher blood glucose level than the NC group. However, the HF-RB and HF-PA groups showed a marked decrease in the blood glucose level relative to HF mice. Furthermore, significantly higher glucokinase (GK) activity and lower phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity were observed in HF-RB and HF-PA mice compared with that of the NC and HF ones. It was also found that the glucose-6-phosphatase (G6pase) activity and hepatic glycogen concentration were considerably higher in HF-RB and HF-PA groups, respectively, than that of the HF mice. These findings demonstrate that both rice bran and phytic acid could reduce the risk of high fat diet-induced hyperglycemia via regulation of hepatic glucose-regulating enzyme activities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus