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Successful Nonsurgical Treatment of Pneumomediastinum, Pneumothorax, Pneumoperitoneum, Pneumoretroperitoneum, and Subcutaneous Emphysema following ERCP.

Fujii L, Lau A, Fleischer DE, Harrison ME - Gastroenterol Res Pract (2010)

Bottom Line: ERCP-related perforation is uncommon, but mortality rates are high.Diagnosis requires a high clinical suspicion for early detection to allow optimal management of the perforation and a better prognosis.Treatment depends on the location and mechanism and increasingly involves nonoperative management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mayo Clinic, 13400 E Shea Blvd, Department of Internal Medicine, Phoenix, AZ 85259, USA.

ABSTRACT
Complications related to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) include pancreatitis, hemorrhage, cholangitis, and perforation. ERCP-related perforation is uncommon, but mortality rates are high. Diagnosis requires a high clinical suspicion for early detection to allow optimal management of the perforation and a better prognosis. Treatment depends on the location and mechanism and increasingly involves nonoperative management. We report a case of successful nonsurgical treatment of a patient with extensive air involving the peritoneum, retroperitoneum, thorax, mediastinum, and subcutaneous tissues following an ERCP perforation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

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Successful Nonsurgical Treatment of Pneumomediastinum, Pneumothorax, Pneumoperitoneum, Pneumoretroperitoneum, and Subcutaneous Emphysema following ERCP.

Fujii L, Lau A, Fleischer DE, Harrison ME - Gastroenterol Res Pract (2010)

© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2901617&req=5

Bottom Line: ERCP-related perforation is uncommon, but mortality rates are high.Diagnosis requires a high clinical suspicion for early detection to allow optimal management of the perforation and a better prognosis.Treatment depends on the location and mechanism and increasingly involves nonoperative management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mayo Clinic, 13400 E Shea Blvd, Department of Internal Medicine, Phoenix, AZ 85259, USA.

ABSTRACT
Complications related to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) include pancreatitis, hemorrhage, cholangitis, and perforation. ERCP-related perforation is uncommon, but mortality rates are high. Diagnosis requires a high clinical suspicion for early detection to allow optimal management of the perforation and a better prognosis. Treatment depends on the location and mechanism and increasingly involves nonoperative management. We report a case of successful nonsurgical treatment of a patient with extensive air involving the peritoneum, retroperitoneum, thorax, mediastinum, and subcutaneous tissues following an ERCP perforation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus