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Effect of a multifaceted, church-based wellness program on metabolic syndrome in 41 overweight or obese congregants.

Ivester P, Sergeant S, Danhauer SC, Case LD, Lamb A, Chilton BG, Delar B, Hollingshead ML, Weaver KL, Chilton FH - Prev Chronic Dis (2010)

Bottom Line: Forty-one overweight or obese adults in a church congregation provided fasting blood samples and answered a wellness questionnaire before and after completing an 8-week diet and exercise program.We also measured weight, body fat, body mass index, and waist and hip circumference.The intervention decreased weight, body fat, and central adiposity; improved indexes of metabolic syndrome; and increased self-reported wellness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Botanical Lipids, 391 Technology Way, Winston-Salem, NC 27101, USA. ivester@wfubmc.edu

ABSTRACT

Introduction: A rise in obesity, poor-quality diets, and low physical activity has led to a dramatic increase in the number of Americans with metabolic syndrome and diabetes. Our objective was to determine the effect of a short-term, multifaceted wellness program carried out in a church setting on weight, metabolic syndrome, and self-reported wellness.

Methods: Forty-one overweight or obese adults in a church congregation provided fasting blood samples and answered a wellness questionnaire before and after completing an 8-week diet and exercise program. We also measured weight, body fat, body mass index, and waist and hip circumference.

Results: The intervention decreased weight, body fat, and central adiposity; improved indexes of metabolic syndrome; and increased self-reported wellness.

Conclusion: A multifaceted wellness intervention that emphasizes diet and exercise can rapidly influence weight, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and self-reported wellness.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Weight, percentage of weight loss, percentage of body fat, and body mass index (BMI) in 41 overweight or obese congregants (27 women and 14 men) during an 8-week diet and exercise intervention and 10-week follow-up, Hillsdale United Methodist Church Wellness Study, Advance, North Carolina, April-August 2008. Data points are means and error bars represent standard errors.
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Figure 1: Weight, percentage of weight loss, percentage of body fat, and body mass index (BMI) in 41 overweight or obese congregants (27 women and 14 men) during an 8-week diet and exercise intervention and 10-week follow-up, Hillsdale United Methodist Church Wellness Study, Advance, North Carolina, April-August 2008. Data points are means and error bars represent standard errors.

Mentions: During the 8-week intervention, men lost an average of 5.9 kg (13.1 lb) and women lost an average of 4.8 kg (10.5 lb), which is approximately a 6% decrease in body weight for both men and women (Figure). After the intervention, the participants' weights were stable for 5 weeks; at 10 weeks, women's weight remained stable but men began to regain weight.


Effect of a multifaceted, church-based wellness program on metabolic syndrome in 41 overweight or obese congregants.

Ivester P, Sergeant S, Danhauer SC, Case LD, Lamb A, Chilton BG, Delar B, Hollingshead ML, Weaver KL, Chilton FH - Prev Chronic Dis (2010)

Weight, percentage of weight loss, percentage of body fat, and body mass index (BMI) in 41 overweight or obese congregants (27 women and 14 men) during an 8-week diet and exercise intervention and 10-week follow-up, Hillsdale United Methodist Church Wellness Study, Advance, North Carolina, April-August 2008. Data points are means and error bars represent standard errors.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2901579&req=5

Figure 1: Weight, percentage of weight loss, percentage of body fat, and body mass index (BMI) in 41 overweight or obese congregants (27 women and 14 men) during an 8-week diet and exercise intervention and 10-week follow-up, Hillsdale United Methodist Church Wellness Study, Advance, North Carolina, April-August 2008. Data points are means and error bars represent standard errors.
Mentions: During the 8-week intervention, men lost an average of 5.9 kg (13.1 lb) and women lost an average of 4.8 kg (10.5 lb), which is approximately a 6% decrease in body weight for both men and women (Figure). After the intervention, the participants' weights were stable for 5 weeks; at 10 weeks, women's weight remained stable but men began to regain weight.

Bottom Line: Forty-one overweight or obese adults in a church congregation provided fasting blood samples and answered a wellness questionnaire before and after completing an 8-week diet and exercise program.We also measured weight, body fat, body mass index, and waist and hip circumference.The intervention decreased weight, body fat, and central adiposity; improved indexes of metabolic syndrome; and increased self-reported wellness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Botanical Lipids, 391 Technology Way, Winston-Salem, NC 27101, USA. ivester@wfubmc.edu

ABSTRACT

Introduction: A rise in obesity, poor-quality diets, and low physical activity has led to a dramatic increase in the number of Americans with metabolic syndrome and diabetes. Our objective was to determine the effect of a short-term, multifaceted wellness program carried out in a church setting on weight, metabolic syndrome, and self-reported wellness.

Methods: Forty-one overweight or obese adults in a church congregation provided fasting blood samples and answered a wellness questionnaire before and after completing an 8-week diet and exercise program. We also measured weight, body fat, body mass index, and waist and hip circumference.

Results: The intervention decreased weight, body fat, and central adiposity; improved indexes of metabolic syndrome; and increased self-reported wellness.

Conclusion: A multifaceted wellness intervention that emphasizes diet and exercise can rapidly influence weight, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and self-reported wellness.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus