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Mobilizing Action Toward Community Health (MATCH): metrics, incentives, and partnerships for population health.

Kindig DA, Booske BC, Remington PL - Prev Chronic Dis (2010)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Population Health Institute, 760 WARF, 610 Walnut St, Madison, WI 53726, USA. dakindig@wisc.edu

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How are we doing — and how can we do better? In response to this need and with funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, we initiated a project called Mobilizing Action Toward Community Health (MATCH) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Population Health Institute... We created a logic model (Figure) that guides our work and demonstrates the principal activities of 1) producing county health rankings in all 50 states, 2) examining partnerships and organizational models to increase involvement and accountability for population health improvement, and 3) developing incentive models to encourage and reward communities that implement evidence-based programs and policies that improve population health... We believe that together these efforts will increase awareness of the multiple determinants of health, promote engagement by a more diverse group of stakeholders, and stimulate development of models that promote evidence-based programs and policies — eventually leading to improved health outcomes and reduced health disparities... We worked with these authors, MATCH and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation staff, and several guests in a 2-day meeting in late 2009 in Madison to discuss the essays and develop an agenda for future practice and research activities for improving population health... In this issue of Preventing Chronic Disease, we present the 7 essays on population health metrics, introduced by 2 commentaries... These essays describe the types of tools that can be used to measure and monitor the health of populations and are the first of 3 sets of essays to appear in this and the next 2 issues... The next set of essays will describe incentives that can be used to promote programs and policies that improve population health, and the role for population health partnerships in these efforts... The final set will summarize the discussion of the 2009 meeting and outline cross-cutting themes and priorities for research and practice in population health improvement... We hope that the essays will stimulate discussion and mobilize action that improves population health outcomes in the coming decade.

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Why Metrics Matter (MP3–3Mb)Listen to an interview with David Kindig, MD, PhD, professor emeritus at the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute and co-principal investigator on the MATCH initiative. Dr Kindig briefly explains why metrics matter and comments on the changing landscape of data collection.
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f2: Why Metrics Matter (MP3–3Mb)Listen to an interview with David Kindig, MD, PhD, professor emeritus at the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute and co-principal investigator on the MATCH initiative. Dr Kindig briefly explains why metrics matter and comments on the changing landscape of data collection.


Mobilizing Action Toward Community Health (MATCH): metrics, incentives, and partnerships for population health.

Kindig DA, Booske BC, Remington PL - Prev Chronic Dis (2010)

Why Metrics Matter (MP3–3Mb)Listen to an interview with David Kindig, MD, PhD, professor emeritus at the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute and co-principal investigator on the MATCH initiative. Dr Kindig briefly explains why metrics matter and comments on the changing landscape of data collection.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2901566&req=5

f2: Why Metrics Matter (MP3–3Mb)Listen to an interview with David Kindig, MD, PhD, professor emeritus at the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute and co-principal investigator on the MATCH initiative. Dr Kindig briefly explains why metrics matter and comments on the changing landscape of data collection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Population Health Institute, 760 WARF, 610 Walnut St, Madison, WI 53726, USA. dakindig@wisc.edu

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

How are we doing — and how can we do better? In response to this need and with funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, we initiated a project called Mobilizing Action Toward Community Health (MATCH) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Population Health Institute... We created a logic model (Figure) that guides our work and demonstrates the principal activities of 1) producing county health rankings in all 50 states, 2) examining partnerships and organizational models to increase involvement and accountability for population health improvement, and 3) developing incentive models to encourage and reward communities that implement evidence-based programs and policies that improve population health... We believe that together these efforts will increase awareness of the multiple determinants of health, promote engagement by a more diverse group of stakeholders, and stimulate development of models that promote evidence-based programs and policies — eventually leading to improved health outcomes and reduced health disparities... We worked with these authors, MATCH and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation staff, and several guests in a 2-day meeting in late 2009 in Madison to discuss the essays and develop an agenda for future practice and research activities for improving population health... In this issue of Preventing Chronic Disease, we present the 7 essays on population health metrics, introduced by 2 commentaries... These essays describe the types of tools that can be used to measure and monitor the health of populations and are the first of 3 sets of essays to appear in this and the next 2 issues... The next set of essays will describe incentives that can be used to promote programs and policies that improve population health, and the role for population health partnerships in these efforts... The final set will summarize the discussion of the 2009 meeting and outline cross-cutting themes and priorities for research and practice in population health improvement... We hope that the essays will stimulate discussion and mobilize action that improves population health outcomes in the coming decade.

Show MeSH