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The causative organisms of bacterial meningitis in Korean children in 1996-2005.

Cho HK, Lee H, Kang JH, Kim KN, Kim DS, Kim YK, Kim JS, Kim JH, Kim CH, Kim HM, Park SE, Oh SH, Chung EH, Cha SH, Choi YY, Hur JK, Hong YJ, Lee HJ, Kim KH - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2010)

Bottom Line: The overall case fatality rate was 9.4%, which was similar with that in 1986-1995.In conclusion, S. agalactiae, S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae were important etiologic agents of bacterial meningitis in children in the last 10 yrs.It is required to establish the preventive strategy of the three bacteria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Bacterial meningitis remains a serious cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood, despite the availability of effective vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) or Streptococcus pneumoniae. The purpose of this study was to analyze data on bacterial meningitis cases in Korea from 1996 through 2005. The information of all hospitalized bacteria-proven meningitis cases was obtained from 17 university hospitals nationwide. A total of 402 cases were identified. Of these, 125 (29.9%) cases were neonates. Streptococcus agalactiae was the most common bacteria responsible for 99 (24.6%) of all cases regardless of age, followed by S. pneumoniae for 91 (22.6%) and H. influenzae for 67 (16.7%) patients. The common etiology beyond the neonatal period was S. pneumoniae for 91 (33.0%) followed by H. influenzae for 63 (22.8%) patients. The overall case fatality rate was 9.4%, which was similar with that in 1986-1995. In conclusion, S. agalactiae, S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae were important etiologic agents of bacterial meningitis in children in the last 10 yrs. It is required to establish the preventive strategy of the three bacteria. The nationwide epidemiologic study should be continued to evaluate immunization strategy and efficacy.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Yearly distribution of bacterial meningitis according to etiologic agents. The incidence of H. influenzae meningitis has markedly decreased since 2001.*The category "others" included coagulase negative Staphylococcus (26 cases, 6.5%), Streptococcus (other than S. agalactiae) (15 cases, 3.7%), Staphylococcus aureus (15 cases, 3.7%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (11 cases, 2.7%), Enterococcus species (10 cases, 2.5%), Enterobacter cloacae (5 cases, 1.2%), Salmonella species (4 cases, 1.0%), Acinetobacter species (4 cases, 1.0%), Listeria species (3 cases, 0.7%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3 cases, 0.7%), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Proteus mirabilis, Flavobacterium indologans and Gramnegative bacilli.
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Figure 1: Yearly distribution of bacterial meningitis according to etiologic agents. The incidence of H. influenzae meningitis has markedly decreased since 2001.*The category "others" included coagulase negative Staphylococcus (26 cases, 6.5%), Streptococcus (other than S. agalactiae) (15 cases, 3.7%), Staphylococcus aureus (15 cases, 3.7%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (11 cases, 2.7%), Enterococcus species (10 cases, 2.5%), Enterobacter cloacae (5 cases, 1.2%), Salmonella species (4 cases, 1.0%), Acinetobacter species (4 cases, 1.0%), Listeria species (3 cases, 0.7%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3 cases, 0.7%), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Proteus mirabilis, Flavobacterium indologans and Gramnegative bacilli.

Mentions: Through the ten years, yearly frequency of bacterial meningitis was similar, however the cases of meningitis caused by H. influenzae have decreased during the period, especially since 2001 (Fig. 1). Among a total of 67 H. influenzae meningitis cases, 51 (76.1%) occurred between 1996 and 2000, thus, the number of cases decreased by a third between 2001 and 2005.


The causative organisms of bacterial meningitis in Korean children in 1996-2005.

Cho HK, Lee H, Kang JH, Kim KN, Kim DS, Kim YK, Kim JS, Kim JH, Kim CH, Kim HM, Park SE, Oh SH, Chung EH, Cha SH, Choi YY, Hur JK, Hong YJ, Lee HJ, Kim KH - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2010)

Yearly distribution of bacterial meningitis according to etiologic agents. The incidence of H. influenzae meningitis has markedly decreased since 2001.*The category "others" included coagulase negative Staphylococcus (26 cases, 6.5%), Streptococcus (other than S. agalactiae) (15 cases, 3.7%), Staphylococcus aureus (15 cases, 3.7%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (11 cases, 2.7%), Enterococcus species (10 cases, 2.5%), Enterobacter cloacae (5 cases, 1.2%), Salmonella species (4 cases, 1.0%), Acinetobacter species (4 cases, 1.0%), Listeria species (3 cases, 0.7%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3 cases, 0.7%), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Proteus mirabilis, Flavobacterium indologans and Gramnegative bacilli.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2877225&req=5

Figure 1: Yearly distribution of bacterial meningitis according to etiologic agents. The incidence of H. influenzae meningitis has markedly decreased since 2001.*The category "others" included coagulase negative Staphylococcus (26 cases, 6.5%), Streptococcus (other than S. agalactiae) (15 cases, 3.7%), Staphylococcus aureus (15 cases, 3.7%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (11 cases, 2.7%), Enterococcus species (10 cases, 2.5%), Enterobacter cloacae (5 cases, 1.2%), Salmonella species (4 cases, 1.0%), Acinetobacter species (4 cases, 1.0%), Listeria species (3 cases, 0.7%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3 cases, 0.7%), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Proteus mirabilis, Flavobacterium indologans and Gramnegative bacilli.
Mentions: Through the ten years, yearly frequency of bacterial meningitis was similar, however the cases of meningitis caused by H. influenzae have decreased during the period, especially since 2001 (Fig. 1). Among a total of 67 H. influenzae meningitis cases, 51 (76.1%) occurred between 1996 and 2000, thus, the number of cases decreased by a third between 2001 and 2005.

Bottom Line: The overall case fatality rate was 9.4%, which was similar with that in 1986-1995.In conclusion, S. agalactiae, S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae were important etiologic agents of bacterial meningitis in children in the last 10 yrs.It is required to establish the preventive strategy of the three bacteria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Bacterial meningitis remains a serious cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood, despite the availability of effective vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) or Streptococcus pneumoniae. The purpose of this study was to analyze data on bacterial meningitis cases in Korea from 1996 through 2005. The information of all hospitalized bacteria-proven meningitis cases was obtained from 17 university hospitals nationwide. A total of 402 cases were identified. Of these, 125 (29.9%) cases were neonates. Streptococcus agalactiae was the most common bacteria responsible for 99 (24.6%) of all cases regardless of age, followed by S. pneumoniae for 91 (22.6%) and H. influenzae for 67 (16.7%) patients. The common etiology beyond the neonatal period was S. pneumoniae for 91 (33.0%) followed by H. influenzae for 63 (22.8%) patients. The overall case fatality rate was 9.4%, which was similar with that in 1986-1995. In conclusion, S. agalactiae, S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae were important etiologic agents of bacterial meningitis in children in the last 10 yrs. It is required to establish the preventive strategy of the three bacteria. The nationwide epidemiologic study should be continued to evaluate immunization strategy and efficacy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus