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Changing molecular epidemiology of group B streptococcus in Korea.

Seo YS, Srinivasan U, Oh KY, Shin JH, Chae JD, Kim MY, Yang JH, Yoon HR, Miller B, DeBusscher J, Foxman B, Ki M - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2010)

Bottom Line: Among these 60 erythromycin-susceptible & clindamycin-resistant isolates, 88% was serotype III, and lnu(B) was found in 89% of strains.Four fifths of the serotype V isolates were resistant to both erythromycin and clindamycin.Further characterization of the genetic assembly of these resistance conferring genes, erm(B) and lnu(B), will be useful to establish the clonal lineages of multiple resistance genes carrying strains.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Eulji Hospital, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
The prevalence of group B streptococcus (GBS) among pregnant women and disease burdens in neonates and adults are increasing in Korea. Colonizing isolates, collected by screening pregnant women (n=196), and clinical isolates collected from clinical patients throughout Korea (n=234), were serotyped and screened for antibiotic resistance. Serotype III (29.8%) and V (27.7%) predominated, followed by Ia (17.0%). Antibiotic resistance was higher among clinical than colonizing isolates for erythromycin (35.1% and 26.9%; P=0.10) and for clindamycin (49.4% and 42.1%; P=0.17). erm(B) occurred in 91.9% of erythromycin resistant isolates, and 84.0% of isolates resistant to clindamycin. Only five isolates (4.2%) resistant to erythromycin were susceptible to clindamycin; by contrast, and unique to Korea, 34% of isolates resistant to clindamycin were erythromycin susceptible. Among these 60 erythromycin-susceptible & clindamycin-resistant isolates, 88% was serotype III, and lnu(B) was found in 89% of strains. Four fifths of the serotype V isolates were resistant to both erythromycin and clindamycin. Further characterization of the genetic assembly of these resistance conferring genes, erm(B) and lnu(B), will be useful to establish the clonal lineages of multiple resistance genes carrying strains.

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Schematic diagram for study isolates collected from Korea (2004 to 2007).
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Figure 1: Schematic diagram for study isolates collected from Korea (2004 to 2007).

Mentions: Study isolates (n=430) were collected over a 3 yr period from various geographic areas in Korea (Table 1). All colonizing isolates were from pregnancy screening, whereas clinical isolates were from 'test requested' samples to the Seoul Clinical Laboratory from throughout Korea. The clinical isolates were from urine (50.4%), surgical wound (10.3%), pus or abscess (8.1%), vagina (7.7%), cervix (6.0%), blood or cerebrospinal fluid (3.9%), prostate (3.0%), sputum (1.7%), and others (9.0%). The colonizing isolates were from the urine (42.9%), vagina (27.0%), rectum (21.9%) or from combined vaginal/rectal specimens (8.2%). In several cases multiple isolates were collected from different sites in a single individual; we assumed these isolates were the same if the isolates had the same serotype, antibiotic resistance profile and antibiotic resistance genotype (erm[A], erm[B], mef[A] and lnu[B]). Six individuals had two different isolates; the remaining analyses are limited to the 376 unique isolates obtained from 371 individuals. Genotype for erythromycin and clindamycin resistance was generated for 354 isolates, because of low DNA concentration (Fig. 1).


Changing molecular epidemiology of group B streptococcus in Korea.

Seo YS, Srinivasan U, Oh KY, Shin JH, Chae JD, Kim MY, Yang JH, Yoon HR, Miller B, DeBusscher J, Foxman B, Ki M - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2010)

Schematic diagram for study isolates collected from Korea (2004 to 2007).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2877223&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic diagram for study isolates collected from Korea (2004 to 2007).
Mentions: Study isolates (n=430) were collected over a 3 yr period from various geographic areas in Korea (Table 1). All colonizing isolates were from pregnancy screening, whereas clinical isolates were from 'test requested' samples to the Seoul Clinical Laboratory from throughout Korea. The clinical isolates were from urine (50.4%), surgical wound (10.3%), pus or abscess (8.1%), vagina (7.7%), cervix (6.0%), blood or cerebrospinal fluid (3.9%), prostate (3.0%), sputum (1.7%), and others (9.0%). The colonizing isolates were from the urine (42.9%), vagina (27.0%), rectum (21.9%) or from combined vaginal/rectal specimens (8.2%). In several cases multiple isolates were collected from different sites in a single individual; we assumed these isolates were the same if the isolates had the same serotype, antibiotic resistance profile and antibiotic resistance genotype (erm[A], erm[B], mef[A] and lnu[B]). Six individuals had two different isolates; the remaining analyses are limited to the 376 unique isolates obtained from 371 individuals. Genotype for erythromycin and clindamycin resistance was generated for 354 isolates, because of low DNA concentration (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: Among these 60 erythromycin-susceptible & clindamycin-resistant isolates, 88% was serotype III, and lnu(B) was found in 89% of strains.Four fifths of the serotype V isolates were resistant to both erythromycin and clindamycin.Further characterization of the genetic assembly of these resistance conferring genes, erm(B) and lnu(B), will be useful to establish the clonal lineages of multiple resistance genes carrying strains.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Eulji Hospital, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
The prevalence of group B streptococcus (GBS) among pregnant women and disease burdens in neonates and adults are increasing in Korea. Colonizing isolates, collected by screening pregnant women (n=196), and clinical isolates collected from clinical patients throughout Korea (n=234), were serotyped and screened for antibiotic resistance. Serotype III (29.8%) and V (27.7%) predominated, followed by Ia (17.0%). Antibiotic resistance was higher among clinical than colonizing isolates for erythromycin (35.1% and 26.9%; P=0.10) and for clindamycin (49.4% and 42.1%; P=0.17). erm(B) occurred in 91.9% of erythromycin resistant isolates, and 84.0% of isolates resistant to clindamycin. Only five isolates (4.2%) resistant to erythromycin were susceptible to clindamycin; by contrast, and unique to Korea, 34% of isolates resistant to clindamycin were erythromycin susceptible. Among these 60 erythromycin-susceptible & clindamycin-resistant isolates, 88% was serotype III, and lnu(B) was found in 89% of strains. Four fifths of the serotype V isolates were resistant to both erythromycin and clindamycin. Further characterization of the genetic assembly of these resistance conferring genes, erm(B) and lnu(B), will be useful to establish the clonal lineages of multiple resistance genes carrying strains.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus