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Identifying and improving knowledge deficits of emergency airway management of tracheotomy and laryngectomy patients: a pilot patient safety initiative.

El-Sayed IH, Ryan S, Schell H, Rappazini R, Wang SJ - Int J Otolaryngol (2010)

Bottom Line: Postintervention, these numbers improved for all groups.Furthermore, 80% of respiratory therapists reported encountering the EAA form in an emergent situation and found it useful.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA.

ABSTRACT
Objectives. To evaluate the knowledge base of hospital staff regarding emergent airway management of tracheotomy and laryngectomy patients, and the impact of the introduction of a bedside airway form. Methods. Cross-sectional surveys of physicians, nurses, and respiratory therapists at a tertiary care hospital prior to and 24 months after introduction of a bedside Emergency Airway Access (EAA) form. Results. Pre- and postintervention surveys revealed several knowledge deficits. Preintervention, 37% of medical internists and 19% overall did not know that laryngectomy patients cannot be orally ventilated, and 67% of internists could not identify the purpose of stay sutures in recently created tracheotomies. Postintervention, these numbers improved for all groups. Furthermore, 80% of respiratory therapists reported encountering the EAA form in an emergent situation and found it useful. Conclusion. A knowledge deficit is identified in caregivers expected to provide emergency management of patients with airway anatomy altered by subspecialty surgeons. Safety initiatives such as the EAA form may improve knowledge among providers.

No MeSH data available.


The UCSF Emergency Airway Access Form, posted at the bedside of all patients with surgically altered airways (reprinted with permission of UCSF and the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: The UCSF Emergency Airway Access Form, posted at the bedside of all patients with surgically altered airways (reprinted with permission of UCSF and the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery).

Mentions: A new Emergency Airway Access (EAA) form for patients with surgically altered airways was created (Figure 1). This form included information on whether there was an available naso-oral airway in case the surgical airway in the neck was obstructed. Other basic information such as the presence of tracheal stay sutures or a Bjork flap was included along with the date, size, and type (cuffed/cuffless) of tracheotomy tube. This form was required to be posted at the patient bedside at all times during his/her stay in the hospital in order to facilitate daily and emergent care.


Identifying and improving knowledge deficits of emergency airway management of tracheotomy and laryngectomy patients: a pilot patient safety initiative.

El-Sayed IH, Ryan S, Schell H, Rappazini R, Wang SJ - Int J Otolaryngol (2010)

The UCSF Emergency Airway Access Form, posted at the bedside of all patients with surgically altered airways (reprinted with permission of UCSF and the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2877199&req=5

fig1: The UCSF Emergency Airway Access Form, posted at the bedside of all patients with surgically altered airways (reprinted with permission of UCSF and the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery).
Mentions: A new Emergency Airway Access (EAA) form for patients with surgically altered airways was created (Figure 1). This form included information on whether there was an available naso-oral airway in case the surgical airway in the neck was obstructed. Other basic information such as the presence of tracheal stay sutures or a Bjork flap was included along with the date, size, and type (cuffed/cuffless) of tracheotomy tube. This form was required to be posted at the patient bedside at all times during his/her stay in the hospital in order to facilitate daily and emergent care.

Bottom Line: Postintervention, these numbers improved for all groups.Furthermore, 80% of respiratory therapists reported encountering the EAA form in an emergent situation and found it useful.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA.

ABSTRACT
Objectives. To evaluate the knowledge base of hospital staff regarding emergent airway management of tracheotomy and laryngectomy patients, and the impact of the introduction of a bedside airway form. Methods. Cross-sectional surveys of physicians, nurses, and respiratory therapists at a tertiary care hospital prior to and 24 months after introduction of a bedside Emergency Airway Access (EAA) form. Results. Pre- and postintervention surveys revealed several knowledge deficits. Preintervention, 37% of medical internists and 19% overall did not know that laryngectomy patients cannot be orally ventilated, and 67% of internists could not identify the purpose of stay sutures in recently created tracheotomies. Postintervention, these numbers improved for all groups. Furthermore, 80% of respiratory therapists reported encountering the EAA form in an emergent situation and found it useful. Conclusion. A knowledge deficit is identified in caregivers expected to provide emergency management of patients with airway anatomy altered by subspecialty surgeons. Safety initiatives such as the EAA form may improve knowledge among providers.

No MeSH data available.