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Social determinants of prescribed and non-prescribed medicine use.

Daban F, Pasarín MI, Rodríguez-Sanz M, García-Altés A, Villalbí JR, Zara C, Borrell C - Int J Equity Health (2010)

Bottom Line: The prevalence of use of prescribed medicines increased with age while the prevalence of non-prescribed use decreased.In terms of social class, a higher percentage of men with good health in the more advantaged classes took non-prescribed medicines compared with disadvantaged classes (38.7% vs 31.8%).In contrast, among the group with poor health, more people from the more advantaged classes took prescribed medicines, compared with disadvantaged classes (51.4% vs 33.3%).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain, (C/Doctor Aiguader, 88 1a Planta), Barcelona (08003), Spain. cborrell@aspb.es.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of the present study was to describe the use of prescribed and non prescribed medicines in a non-institutionalised population older than 15 years of an urban area during the year 2000, in terms of age and gender, social class, employment status and type of Primary Health Care.

Methods: Cross-sectional study. Information came from the 2000 Barcelona Health Interview Survey. The indicators used were the prevalence of use of prescribed and non-prescribed medicines in the two weeks prior to the interview. Descriptive analyses, bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out.

Results: More women than men took medicines (75.8% vs. 60% respectively). The prevalence of use of prescribed medicines increased with age while the prevalence of non-prescribed use decreased. These age differences are smaller among those with poor perceived health. In terms of social class, a higher percentage of men with good health in the more advantaged classes took non-prescribed medicines compared with disadvantaged classes (38.7% vs 31.8%). In contrast, among the group with poor health, more people from the more advantaged classes took prescribed medicines, compared with disadvantaged classes (51.4% vs 33.3%). A higher proportion of people who were either retired, unemployed or students, with good health, used prescribed medicines.

Conclusion: This study shows that beside health needs, there are social determinants affecting medicine consumption in the city of Barcelona.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of medicine use by age. Stratified by men/women and non-prescribed medication/prescribed medication. Barcelona Health Interview Survey 2000.
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Figure 3: Percentage of medicine use by age. Stratified by men/women and non-prescribed medication/prescribed medication. Barcelona Health Interview Survey 2000.

Mentions: Use of non-prescribed medicines is more common in younger people, whereas use of prescribed medicines is more common among older people (figure 3). However, it should be noted that in the multivariate analysis among those with poor health, these differences are not significant (with the exception of elderly people who use prescribed medicines since they have a higher probability of consuming, OR = 8.63; 95%CI = 1.97-37.77 for men, and OR = 3.13; 95%CI = 1.13-8.63 for women, see tables 3 and 4).


Social determinants of prescribed and non-prescribed medicine use.

Daban F, Pasarín MI, Rodríguez-Sanz M, García-Altés A, Villalbí JR, Zara C, Borrell C - Int J Equity Health (2010)

Percentage of medicine use by age. Stratified by men/women and non-prescribed medication/prescribed medication. Barcelona Health Interview Survey 2000.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2877047&req=5

Figure 3: Percentage of medicine use by age. Stratified by men/women and non-prescribed medication/prescribed medication. Barcelona Health Interview Survey 2000.
Mentions: Use of non-prescribed medicines is more common in younger people, whereas use of prescribed medicines is more common among older people (figure 3). However, it should be noted that in the multivariate analysis among those with poor health, these differences are not significant (with the exception of elderly people who use prescribed medicines since they have a higher probability of consuming, OR = 8.63; 95%CI = 1.97-37.77 for men, and OR = 3.13; 95%CI = 1.13-8.63 for women, see tables 3 and 4).

Bottom Line: The prevalence of use of prescribed medicines increased with age while the prevalence of non-prescribed use decreased.In terms of social class, a higher percentage of men with good health in the more advantaged classes took non-prescribed medicines compared with disadvantaged classes (38.7% vs 31.8%).In contrast, among the group with poor health, more people from the more advantaged classes took prescribed medicines, compared with disadvantaged classes (51.4% vs 33.3%).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain, (C/Doctor Aiguader, 88 1a Planta), Barcelona (08003), Spain. cborrell@aspb.es.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of the present study was to describe the use of prescribed and non prescribed medicines in a non-institutionalised population older than 15 years of an urban area during the year 2000, in terms of age and gender, social class, employment status and type of Primary Health Care.

Methods: Cross-sectional study. Information came from the 2000 Barcelona Health Interview Survey. The indicators used were the prevalence of use of prescribed and non-prescribed medicines in the two weeks prior to the interview. Descriptive analyses, bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out.

Results: More women than men took medicines (75.8% vs. 60% respectively). The prevalence of use of prescribed medicines increased with age while the prevalence of non-prescribed use decreased. These age differences are smaller among those with poor perceived health. In terms of social class, a higher percentage of men with good health in the more advantaged classes took non-prescribed medicines compared with disadvantaged classes (38.7% vs 31.8%). In contrast, among the group with poor health, more people from the more advantaged classes took prescribed medicines, compared with disadvantaged classes (51.4% vs 33.3%). A higher proportion of people who were either retired, unemployed or students, with good health, used prescribed medicines.

Conclusion: This study shows that beside health needs, there are social determinants affecting medicine consumption in the city of Barcelona.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus