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Taylor's approach in an ankylosing spondylitis patient posted for percutaneous nephrolithotomy: A challenge for anesthesiologists.

Jindal P, Chopra G, Chaudhary A, Rizvi AA, Sharma JP - Saudi J Anaesth (2009)

Bottom Line: Fiberoptic bronchoscopy was attempted, but without success.This resulted in adequate sensory and motor blockade for the surgical procedure.The patient did not require airway interventions, but equipment and aids to secure airway were available.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care and Pain Management, Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences, Dehradun, Uttaranchal, India.

ABSTRACT
We describe a patient with long-standing ankylosing spondylitis who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy under spinal anesthesia. At preoperative assessment, it was considered that intubation of the trachea was likely to be difficult. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy was attempted, but without success. As the standard technique for spinal anesthesia failed, a variation of the paramedian approach in the lumbosacral approach, also known as Taylor's approach was successfully attempted. This resulted in adequate sensory and motor blockade for the surgical procedure. The patient did not require airway interventions, but equipment and aids to secure airway were available.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Patient in the recovery room. Due to the ankylosing spine, the patient's head is supported with two pillows and the head end of the bed is raised
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Figure 0001: Patient in the recovery room. Due to the ankylosing spine, the patient's head is supported with two pillows and the head end of the bed is raised

Mentions: During preanesthetic assessment his history revealed that the he required three pillows to support his head due to the disease process and involvement of the cervical spines [Figure 1]. A physical examination suggested that there was severe cervical spondylitis involving thoracolumbar vertebral column, without lower limb neurological involvement. No cardiovascular system abnormality was detected.


Taylor's approach in an ankylosing spondylitis patient posted for percutaneous nephrolithotomy: A challenge for anesthesiologists.

Jindal P, Chopra G, Chaudhary A, Rizvi AA, Sharma JP - Saudi J Anaesth (2009)

Patient in the recovery room. Due to the ankylosing spine, the patient's head is supported with two pillows and the head end of the bed is raised
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2876933&req=5

Figure 0001: Patient in the recovery room. Due to the ankylosing spine, the patient's head is supported with two pillows and the head end of the bed is raised
Mentions: During preanesthetic assessment his history revealed that the he required three pillows to support his head due to the disease process and involvement of the cervical spines [Figure 1]. A physical examination suggested that there was severe cervical spondylitis involving thoracolumbar vertebral column, without lower limb neurological involvement. No cardiovascular system abnormality was detected.

Bottom Line: Fiberoptic bronchoscopy was attempted, but without success.This resulted in adequate sensory and motor blockade for the surgical procedure.The patient did not require airway interventions, but equipment and aids to secure airway were available.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care and Pain Management, Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences, Dehradun, Uttaranchal, India.

ABSTRACT
We describe a patient with long-standing ankylosing spondylitis who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy under spinal anesthesia. At preoperative assessment, it was considered that intubation of the trachea was likely to be difficult. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy was attempted, but without success. As the standard technique for spinal anesthesia failed, a variation of the paramedian approach in the lumbosacral approach, also known as Taylor's approach was successfully attempted. This resulted in adequate sensory and motor blockade for the surgical procedure. The patient did not require airway interventions, but equipment and aids to secure airway were available.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus