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Seven kinds of intermediate filament networks in the cytoplasm of polarized cells: structure and function.

Iwatsuki H, Suda M - Acta Histochem Cytochem (2010)

Bottom Line: However, little information exists on the structure of the IF networks performing these functions.We have clarified the existence of seven kinds of IF networks in the cytoplasm of diverse polarized cells: an apex network just under the terminal web, a peripheral network lying just beneath the cell membrane, a granule-associated network surrounding a mass of secretory granules, a Golgi-associated network surrounding the Golgi apparatus, a radial network locating from the perinuclear region to the specific area of the cell membrane, a juxtanuclear network surrounding the nucleus, and an entire cytoplasmic network.In this review, we describe these seven kinds of IF networks and discuss their biological roles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomy, Kawasaki Medical School, Matsushima 577, Kurashiki 701-0192, Japan. iwatsuki@med.kawasaki-m.ac.jp

ABSTRACT
Intermediate filaments (IFs) are involved in many important physiological functions, such as the distribution of organelles, signal transduction, cell polarity and gene regulation. However, little information exists on the structure of the IF networks performing these functions. We have clarified the existence of seven kinds of IF networks in the cytoplasm of diverse polarized cells: an apex network just under the terminal web, a peripheral network lying just beneath the cell membrane, a granule-associated network surrounding a mass of secretory granules, a Golgi-associated network surrounding the Golgi apparatus, a radial network locating from the perinuclear region to the specific area of the cell membrane, a juxtanuclear network surrounding the nucleus, and an entire cytoplasmic network. In this review, we describe these seven kinds of IF networks and discuss their biological roles.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic representation of changes in the composition of the Golgi-associated network during the migration of absorptive cells along the crypt-villus axis. The Golgi-associated network consists of keratin 8/14 filaments (K8/K14) alone in the immature absorptive cells at the upper crypt. This network is reinforced by the addition of actin filaments at the villus base and keratin 7/17 filaments (K7/K17) at the mid-villus to keratin 8/14 filaments following maturation of the Golgi apparatus.
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Figure 8: Schematic representation of changes in the composition of the Golgi-associated network during the migration of absorptive cells along the crypt-villus axis. The Golgi-associated network consists of keratin 8/14 filaments (K8/K14) alone in the immature absorptive cells at the upper crypt. This network is reinforced by the addition of actin filaments at the villus base and keratin 7/17 filaments (K7/K17) at the mid-villus to keratin 8/14 filaments following maturation of the Golgi apparatus.

Mentions: Absorptive cells of the small intestinal villi are derived from the stem cells in the crypts [72]. Immature absorptive cells move upward onto the villi, and reach functional maturity during cell migration to the mid-portion of the villi [97, 143]. As shown in FigureĀ 8, the Golgi-associated network in the immature absorptive cells at first consists of keratin 8/14 filaments alone. When the cells migrate out of the crypt to the villus base, actin filaments enter this network. In addition, keratin 7/17 filaments enter this network in mature cells at the mid-villus. Additional changes in their components could not be recognized during the cells migration from the mid-villus to the villus tip [63]. The ultrastructure of the Golgi apparatus in absorptive cells changes as the cells migrate along the crypt-villus axis and their maturation is completed at the mid-villus [72, 97]. Therefore, it seems that the Golgi-associated network of the absorptive cells is reinforced by the addition of actin filaments and keratin 7/17 filaments to keratin 8/14 filaments following maturation of the Golgi apparatus.


Seven kinds of intermediate filament networks in the cytoplasm of polarized cells: structure and function.

Iwatsuki H, Suda M - Acta Histochem Cytochem (2010)

Schematic representation of changes in the composition of the Golgi-associated network during the migration of absorptive cells along the crypt-villus axis. The Golgi-associated network consists of keratin 8/14 filaments (K8/K14) alone in the immature absorptive cells at the upper crypt. This network is reinforced by the addition of actin filaments at the villus base and keratin 7/17 filaments (K7/K17) at the mid-villus to keratin 8/14 filaments following maturation of the Golgi apparatus.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2875862&req=5

Figure 8: Schematic representation of changes in the composition of the Golgi-associated network during the migration of absorptive cells along the crypt-villus axis. The Golgi-associated network consists of keratin 8/14 filaments (K8/K14) alone in the immature absorptive cells at the upper crypt. This network is reinforced by the addition of actin filaments at the villus base and keratin 7/17 filaments (K7/K17) at the mid-villus to keratin 8/14 filaments following maturation of the Golgi apparatus.
Mentions: Absorptive cells of the small intestinal villi are derived from the stem cells in the crypts [72]. Immature absorptive cells move upward onto the villi, and reach functional maturity during cell migration to the mid-portion of the villi [97, 143]. As shown in FigureĀ 8, the Golgi-associated network in the immature absorptive cells at first consists of keratin 8/14 filaments alone. When the cells migrate out of the crypt to the villus base, actin filaments enter this network. In addition, keratin 7/17 filaments enter this network in mature cells at the mid-villus. Additional changes in their components could not be recognized during the cells migration from the mid-villus to the villus tip [63]. The ultrastructure of the Golgi apparatus in absorptive cells changes as the cells migrate along the crypt-villus axis and their maturation is completed at the mid-villus [72, 97]. Therefore, it seems that the Golgi-associated network of the absorptive cells is reinforced by the addition of actin filaments and keratin 7/17 filaments to keratin 8/14 filaments following maturation of the Golgi apparatus.

Bottom Line: However, little information exists on the structure of the IF networks performing these functions.We have clarified the existence of seven kinds of IF networks in the cytoplasm of diverse polarized cells: an apex network just under the terminal web, a peripheral network lying just beneath the cell membrane, a granule-associated network surrounding a mass of secretory granules, a Golgi-associated network surrounding the Golgi apparatus, a radial network locating from the perinuclear region to the specific area of the cell membrane, a juxtanuclear network surrounding the nucleus, and an entire cytoplasmic network.In this review, we describe these seven kinds of IF networks and discuss their biological roles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomy, Kawasaki Medical School, Matsushima 577, Kurashiki 701-0192, Japan. iwatsuki@med.kawasaki-m.ac.jp

ABSTRACT
Intermediate filaments (IFs) are involved in many important physiological functions, such as the distribution of organelles, signal transduction, cell polarity and gene regulation. However, little information exists on the structure of the IF networks performing these functions. We have clarified the existence of seven kinds of IF networks in the cytoplasm of diverse polarized cells: an apex network just under the terminal web, a peripheral network lying just beneath the cell membrane, a granule-associated network surrounding a mass of secretory granules, a Golgi-associated network surrounding the Golgi apparatus, a radial network locating from the perinuclear region to the specific area of the cell membrane, a juxtanuclear network surrounding the nucleus, and an entire cytoplasmic network. In this review, we describe these seven kinds of IF networks and discuss their biological roles.

No MeSH data available.