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Decreased lung carcinoma cell density on select polymer nanometer surface features for lung replacement therapies.

Zhang L, Chun YW, Webster TJ - Int J Nanomedicine (2010)

Bottom Line: Previous studies have shown that cells (such as bladder smooth muscle cells, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts) respond differently to nanostructured PLGA surfaces compared with nanosmooth surfaces.A solution evaporation method was also utilized to modify PLGA surface features by using 8 wt% (to obtain an AFM RMS value of 0.62 nm) and 4 wt% (to obtain an AFM RMS value of 2.23 nm) PLGA in chloroform solutions.After three days, PLGA surfaces with an RMS value of 0.62 nm had much lower cell density than any other sample.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, USA.

ABSTRACT
Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) has been widely used as a biomaterial in regenerative medicine because of its biocompatibility and biodegradability properties. Previous studies have shown that cells (such as bladder smooth muscle cells, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts) respond differently to nanostructured PLGA surfaces compared with nanosmooth surfaces. The purpose of the present in vitro research was to prepare PLGA films with various nanometer surface features and determine whether lung cancer epithelial cells respond differently to such topographies. To create nanosurface features on PLGA, different sized (190 nm, 300 nm, 400 nm, and 530 nm diameter) polystyrene beads were used to cast polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) molds which were used as templates to create nanofeatured PLGA films. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images and root mean square roughness (RMS) values indicated that the intended spherical surface nanotopographies on PLGA with RMS values of 2.23, 5.03, 5.42, and 36.90 nm were formed by employing 190, 300, 400, and 530 nm beads. A solution evaporation method was also utilized to modify PLGA surface features by using 8 wt% (to obtain an AFM RMS value of 0.62 nm) and 4 wt% (to obtain an AFM RMS value of 2.23 nm) PLGA in chloroform solutions. Most importantly, lung cancer epithelial cells adhered less on the PLGA surfaces with RMS values of 0.62, 2.23, and 5.42 nm after four hours of culture compared with any other PLGA surface created here. After three days, PLGA surfaces with an RMS value of 0.62 nm had much lower cell density than any other sample. In this manner, PLGA with specific nanometer surface features may inhibit lung cancer cell density which may provide an important biomaterial for the treatment of lung cancer (from drug delivery to regenerative medicine).

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Lung cancer epithelial cell adhesion results on the various PLGA samples and borosilicate glass. Data expressed as mean ± standard deviation of the mean.Notes:*P < 0.01, **P < 0.05 and **P < 0.1. Less lung carcinoma cells adhered to the PLGA surfaces with an RMS value of 5.42 nm, compared with the surfaces with an RMS value of 2.30 nm (P < 0.05). Comparing the PLGA surfaces with RMS values of 2.30, 2.23, and 5.42 nm, the least cells adhered to the surfaces with an RMS value of 5.42 nm. PLGA surfaces with RMS values of 5.42, 0.62, and 2.23 nm had the least cancer cell adhesion.Abbreviations: PLGA, poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid; RMS, root mean square roughness.
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f4-ijn-5-269: Lung cancer epithelial cell adhesion results on the various PLGA samples and borosilicate glass. Data expressed as mean ± standard deviation of the mean.Notes:*P < 0.01, **P < 0.05 and **P < 0.1. Less lung carcinoma cells adhered to the PLGA surfaces with an RMS value of 5.42 nm, compared with the surfaces with an RMS value of 2.30 nm (P < 0.05). Comparing the PLGA surfaces with RMS values of 2.30, 2.23, and 5.42 nm, the least cells adhered to the surfaces with an RMS value of 5.42 nm. PLGA surfaces with RMS values of 5.42, 0.62, and 2.23 nm had the least cancer cell adhesion.Abbreviations: PLGA, poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid; RMS, root mean square roughness.

Mentions: After four hours of cell adhesion, 24.54%, 26.78%, 34.53%, 44.83%, 24.67%, and 40.74% cells from the seeded densities adhered to the PLGA surfaces with RMS values of 0.62, 2.23, 2.30, 5.03, 5.42, and 36.90 nm, respectively (Figure 4). Most importantly, results of this study showed the least number of lung carcinoma epithelial cells adherent to the PLGA surfaces with RMS values of 0.62, 2.23, and 5.42 nm. The results of this study indicated that compared with the PLGA surfaces with an RMS value of 2.23 nm, 2.11% fewer lung carcinoma cells adhered to PLGA surfaces with an RMS value of 5.42 nm. However, the two numbers were not significantly different. Compared with the surfaces with an RMS value of 2.30 nm, 7.75% and 9.86% fewer cells adhered to the surfaces, with RMS values of 2.23 and 5.42 nm, respectively (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in cancer cell attachment between PLGA surfaces with RMS values of 2.30 nm and 5.03 or 36.89 nm. Compared with the PLGA surfaces having an RMS value of 0.62 nm, 20.29% and 16.20% more cancer cells adhered to the surfaces with RMS values of 5.03 (P < 0.05) and 36.89 nm, respectively (P < 0.05). However, no significant difference existed between lung cancer cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with an RMS value of 0.62 nm and 2.23 nm or 5.42 nm. For surfaces with RMS values of 2.23, 5.03, 5.42, and 36.89 nm, fewer cancer cells adhered to the surfaces with RMS values of 2.23 and 5.42 nm than surfaces with RMS values of 5.03 and 36.89 nm. No significant differences existed between surfaces with an RMS value of 2.23 nm and surfaces with an RMS value of 5.42 nm. Thus, such results indicated that PLGA surface nanoroughness had an extreme effect on the adhesion of lung carcinoma epithelial cells. By creating specific surface nanoroughness, lung cancer epithelial cell density can be minimized.


Decreased lung carcinoma cell density on select polymer nanometer surface features for lung replacement therapies.

Zhang L, Chun YW, Webster TJ - Int J Nanomedicine (2010)

Lung cancer epithelial cell adhesion results on the various PLGA samples and borosilicate glass. Data expressed as mean ± standard deviation of the mean.Notes:*P < 0.01, **P < 0.05 and **P < 0.1. Less lung carcinoma cells adhered to the PLGA surfaces with an RMS value of 5.42 nm, compared with the surfaces with an RMS value of 2.30 nm (P < 0.05). Comparing the PLGA surfaces with RMS values of 2.30, 2.23, and 5.42 nm, the least cells adhered to the surfaces with an RMS value of 5.42 nm. PLGA surfaces with RMS values of 5.42, 0.62, and 2.23 nm had the least cancer cell adhesion.Abbreviations: PLGA, poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid; RMS, root mean square roughness.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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f4-ijn-5-269: Lung cancer epithelial cell adhesion results on the various PLGA samples and borosilicate glass. Data expressed as mean ± standard deviation of the mean.Notes:*P < 0.01, **P < 0.05 and **P < 0.1. Less lung carcinoma cells adhered to the PLGA surfaces with an RMS value of 5.42 nm, compared with the surfaces with an RMS value of 2.30 nm (P < 0.05). Comparing the PLGA surfaces with RMS values of 2.30, 2.23, and 5.42 nm, the least cells adhered to the surfaces with an RMS value of 5.42 nm. PLGA surfaces with RMS values of 5.42, 0.62, and 2.23 nm had the least cancer cell adhesion.Abbreviations: PLGA, poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid; RMS, root mean square roughness.
Mentions: After four hours of cell adhesion, 24.54%, 26.78%, 34.53%, 44.83%, 24.67%, and 40.74% cells from the seeded densities adhered to the PLGA surfaces with RMS values of 0.62, 2.23, 2.30, 5.03, 5.42, and 36.90 nm, respectively (Figure 4). Most importantly, results of this study showed the least number of lung carcinoma epithelial cells adherent to the PLGA surfaces with RMS values of 0.62, 2.23, and 5.42 nm. The results of this study indicated that compared with the PLGA surfaces with an RMS value of 2.23 nm, 2.11% fewer lung carcinoma cells adhered to PLGA surfaces with an RMS value of 5.42 nm. However, the two numbers were not significantly different. Compared with the surfaces with an RMS value of 2.30 nm, 7.75% and 9.86% fewer cells adhered to the surfaces, with RMS values of 2.23 and 5.42 nm, respectively (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in cancer cell attachment between PLGA surfaces with RMS values of 2.30 nm and 5.03 or 36.89 nm. Compared with the PLGA surfaces having an RMS value of 0.62 nm, 20.29% and 16.20% more cancer cells adhered to the surfaces with RMS values of 5.03 (P < 0.05) and 36.89 nm, respectively (P < 0.05). However, no significant difference existed between lung cancer cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with an RMS value of 0.62 nm and 2.23 nm or 5.42 nm. For surfaces with RMS values of 2.23, 5.03, 5.42, and 36.89 nm, fewer cancer cells adhered to the surfaces with RMS values of 2.23 and 5.42 nm than surfaces with RMS values of 5.03 and 36.89 nm. No significant differences existed between surfaces with an RMS value of 2.23 nm and surfaces with an RMS value of 5.42 nm. Thus, such results indicated that PLGA surface nanoroughness had an extreme effect on the adhesion of lung carcinoma epithelial cells. By creating specific surface nanoroughness, lung cancer epithelial cell density can be minimized.

Bottom Line: Previous studies have shown that cells (such as bladder smooth muscle cells, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts) respond differently to nanostructured PLGA surfaces compared with nanosmooth surfaces.A solution evaporation method was also utilized to modify PLGA surface features by using 8 wt% (to obtain an AFM RMS value of 0.62 nm) and 4 wt% (to obtain an AFM RMS value of 2.23 nm) PLGA in chloroform solutions.After three days, PLGA surfaces with an RMS value of 0.62 nm had much lower cell density than any other sample.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, USA.

ABSTRACT
Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) has been widely used as a biomaterial in regenerative medicine because of its biocompatibility and biodegradability properties. Previous studies have shown that cells (such as bladder smooth muscle cells, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts) respond differently to nanostructured PLGA surfaces compared with nanosmooth surfaces. The purpose of the present in vitro research was to prepare PLGA films with various nanometer surface features and determine whether lung cancer epithelial cells respond differently to such topographies. To create nanosurface features on PLGA, different sized (190 nm, 300 nm, 400 nm, and 530 nm diameter) polystyrene beads were used to cast polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) molds which were used as templates to create nanofeatured PLGA films. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images and root mean square roughness (RMS) values indicated that the intended spherical surface nanotopographies on PLGA with RMS values of 2.23, 5.03, 5.42, and 36.90 nm were formed by employing 190, 300, 400, and 530 nm beads. A solution evaporation method was also utilized to modify PLGA surface features by using 8 wt% (to obtain an AFM RMS value of 0.62 nm) and 4 wt% (to obtain an AFM RMS value of 2.23 nm) PLGA in chloroform solutions. Most importantly, lung cancer epithelial cells adhered less on the PLGA surfaces with RMS values of 0.62, 2.23, and 5.42 nm after four hours of culture compared with any other PLGA surface created here. After three days, PLGA surfaces with an RMS value of 0.62 nm had much lower cell density than any other sample. In this manner, PLGA with specific nanometer surface features may inhibit lung cancer cell density which may provide an important biomaterial for the treatment of lung cancer (from drug delivery to regenerative medicine).

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus