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Characteristics of tetanic force produced by the sternomastoid muscle of the rat.

Sobotka S, Mu L - J. Biomed. Biotechnol. (2010)

Bottom Line: It also has unique anatomical advantages that allow its wide use in head and neck tissue reconstruction and muscle reinnervation.However, little is known about its contractile properties.These data are important not only to better understand the contractile properties of the rat SM muscle, but also to provide normative values which are critical to reliably assess the extent of functional recovery following muscle reinnervation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Research, Upper Airway Research Laboratory, Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ 07601, USA.

ABSTRACT
The sternomastoid (SM) muscle plays an important role in supporting breathing. It also has unique anatomical advantages that allow its wide use in head and neck tissue reconstruction and muscle reinnervation. However, little is known about its contractile properties. The experiments were run on rats and designed to determine in vivo the relationship between muscle force (active muscle contraction to electrical stimulation) with passive tension (passive force changing muscle length) and two parameters (intensity and frequency) of electrical stimulation. The threshold current for initiating noticeable muscle contraction was 0.03 mA. Maximal muscle force (0.94 N) was produced by using moderate muscle length/tension (28 mm/0.08 N), 0.2 mA stimulation current, and 150 Hz stimulation frequency. These data are important not only to better understand the contractile properties of the rat SM muscle, but also to provide normative values which are critical to reliably assess the extent of functional recovery following muscle reinnervation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A diagram of the data acquisition system, which provides electrical stimulation and records muscle force. Note that a dell laptop with user written software in Labview 8.2 is used to control the experiment. The SM muscle is detached from its rostral tendon and attached to the lever of servomotor, which controls muscle stretch and measures muscle force. Electrical stimulation with parameters controlled by LabView software (National Instruments) is generated by the Multifunctional board 6251 (National Instruments) and delivered to the SM nerve. Data are analyzed off line with DIAdem 11.0 software (National Instruments).
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fig1: A diagram of the data acquisition system, which provides electrical stimulation and records muscle force. Note that a dell laptop with user written software in Labview 8.2 is used to control the experiment. The SM muscle is detached from its rostral tendon and attached to the lever of servomotor, which controls muscle stretch and measures muscle force. Electrical stimulation with parameters controlled by LabView software (National Instruments) is generated by the Multifunctional board 6251 (National Instruments) and delivered to the SM nerve. Data are analyzed off line with DIAdem 11.0 software (National Instruments).

Mentions: Our studies have demonstrated that the rat SM is supplied by a branch derived from the spinal accessory nerve and has a single motor endplate band at the midpoint of the muscle (data not shown). The right SM muscle and its innervating nerve were isolated from surrounding tissues and prepared for nerve stimulation and force measurement. First of all, the rostral tendon of the SM was identified, transected, and attached with a 2-0 suture to a servomotor lever arm (Model 305B Dual-Mode Lever Arm System, Aurora Scientific Inc., Aurora, Ontario, Canada, see Figure 1). The adjustable arm of the servomotor was used to alter muscle length and to provide a measure of muscle force. Then, the SM nerve was placed on a bipolar stimulating electrode constructed from two hooked silver wires separated by 4 mm (Figure 1) attached to a high precision micromanipulator (Narishige Scientific Instruments, Tokyo, Japan).


Characteristics of tetanic force produced by the sternomastoid muscle of the rat.

Sobotka S, Mu L - J. Biomed. Biotechnol. (2010)

A diagram of the data acquisition system, which provides electrical stimulation and records muscle force. Note that a dell laptop with user written software in Labview 8.2 is used to control the experiment. The SM muscle is detached from its rostral tendon and attached to the lever of servomotor, which controls muscle stretch and measures muscle force. Electrical stimulation with parameters controlled by LabView software (National Instruments) is generated by the Multifunctional board 6251 (National Instruments) and delivered to the SM nerve. Data are analyzed off line with DIAdem 11.0 software (National Instruments).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2875700&req=5

fig1: A diagram of the data acquisition system, which provides electrical stimulation and records muscle force. Note that a dell laptop with user written software in Labview 8.2 is used to control the experiment. The SM muscle is detached from its rostral tendon and attached to the lever of servomotor, which controls muscle stretch and measures muscle force. Electrical stimulation with parameters controlled by LabView software (National Instruments) is generated by the Multifunctional board 6251 (National Instruments) and delivered to the SM nerve. Data are analyzed off line with DIAdem 11.0 software (National Instruments).
Mentions: Our studies have demonstrated that the rat SM is supplied by a branch derived from the spinal accessory nerve and has a single motor endplate band at the midpoint of the muscle (data not shown). The right SM muscle and its innervating nerve were isolated from surrounding tissues and prepared for nerve stimulation and force measurement. First of all, the rostral tendon of the SM was identified, transected, and attached with a 2-0 suture to a servomotor lever arm (Model 305B Dual-Mode Lever Arm System, Aurora Scientific Inc., Aurora, Ontario, Canada, see Figure 1). The adjustable arm of the servomotor was used to alter muscle length and to provide a measure of muscle force. Then, the SM nerve was placed on a bipolar stimulating electrode constructed from two hooked silver wires separated by 4 mm (Figure 1) attached to a high precision micromanipulator (Narishige Scientific Instruments, Tokyo, Japan).

Bottom Line: It also has unique anatomical advantages that allow its wide use in head and neck tissue reconstruction and muscle reinnervation.However, little is known about its contractile properties.These data are important not only to better understand the contractile properties of the rat SM muscle, but also to provide normative values which are critical to reliably assess the extent of functional recovery following muscle reinnervation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Research, Upper Airway Research Laboratory, Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ 07601, USA.

ABSTRACT
The sternomastoid (SM) muscle plays an important role in supporting breathing. It also has unique anatomical advantages that allow its wide use in head and neck tissue reconstruction and muscle reinnervation. However, little is known about its contractile properties. The experiments were run on rats and designed to determine in vivo the relationship between muscle force (active muscle contraction to electrical stimulation) with passive tension (passive force changing muscle length) and two parameters (intensity and frequency) of electrical stimulation. The threshold current for initiating noticeable muscle contraction was 0.03 mA. Maximal muscle force (0.94 N) was produced by using moderate muscle length/tension (28 mm/0.08 N), 0.2 mA stimulation current, and 150 Hz stimulation frequency. These data are important not only to better understand the contractile properties of the rat SM muscle, but also to provide normative values which are critical to reliably assess the extent of functional recovery following muscle reinnervation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus