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A three-dimensional atlas of the honeybee neck.

Berry RP, Ibbotson MR - PLoS ONE (2010)

Bottom Line: We used serial sectioning combined with manual registration and segmentation of images to develop a comprehensive and detailed three-dimensional atlas of the honeybee head-neck system.This interactive atlas includes skeletal structures of the head and prothorax, the neck musculature, and the nervous system.The scope and resolution of the model exceeds atlases previously developed on similar sized animals, and the interactive nature of the model provides a far more accessible means of interpreting and comprehending insect anatomy and neuroanatomy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ARC Centre of Excellence in Vision Science, Division of Biomedical Science and Biochemistry, School of Biology, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Three-dimensional digital atlases are rapidly becoming indispensible in modern biology. We used serial sectioning combined with manual registration and segmentation of images to develop a comprehensive and detailed three-dimensional atlas of the honeybee head-neck system. This interactive atlas includes skeletal structures of the head and prothorax, the neck musculature, and the nervous system. The scope and resolution of the model exceeds atlases previously developed on similar sized animals, and the interactive nature of the model provides a far more accessible means of interpreting and comprehending insect anatomy and neuroanatomy.

Show MeSH
The leg muscles of the propectus, endosternum and pronotum.(A) Promoters of the fore coxae: dorsal view; (B) anterolateral view of right propectus, right 53a/b, left 54 and left mcr. (C) Remoters of the fore coxae: dorsal view; (D) Posterior view of right 55, right 56, left 61a (translucent) and left 61b. Colour codes as in Fig. 1.
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pone-0010771-g009: The leg muscles of the propectus, endosternum and pronotum.(A) Promoters of the fore coxae: dorsal view; (B) anterolateral view of right propectus, right 53a/b, left 54 and left mcr. (C) Remoters of the fore coxae: dorsal view; (D) Posterior view of right 55, right 56, left 61a (translucent) and left 61b. Colour codes as in Fig. 1.

Mentions: Nine other muscles attach to the propectus, endosternum, or anterior pronotum. These are all muscles that are responsible for promoting (53a/b, 54, mcr) or remoting the fore coxae (55, 56) or trochanter (61a/b) (Fig. 9). While the dominant function of these muscels is to move the legs, it is possible that contraction of these muscles causes indirect head movement by depression of the propectus (53, 57, 61) or endosternum (54, 56), or flexion of the pronotum (55), thus linking movements of the forelegs to movements of the head. Certainly, these muscles provide substantial rigidity between the propectus, endosternum and coxae.


A three-dimensional atlas of the honeybee neck.

Berry RP, Ibbotson MR - PLoS ONE (2010)

The leg muscles of the propectus, endosternum and pronotum.(A) Promoters of the fore coxae: dorsal view; (B) anterolateral view of right propectus, right 53a/b, left 54 and left mcr. (C) Remoters of the fore coxae: dorsal view; (D) Posterior view of right 55, right 56, left 61a (translucent) and left 61b. Colour codes as in Fig. 1.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2875396&req=5

pone-0010771-g009: The leg muscles of the propectus, endosternum and pronotum.(A) Promoters of the fore coxae: dorsal view; (B) anterolateral view of right propectus, right 53a/b, left 54 and left mcr. (C) Remoters of the fore coxae: dorsal view; (D) Posterior view of right 55, right 56, left 61a (translucent) and left 61b. Colour codes as in Fig. 1.
Mentions: Nine other muscles attach to the propectus, endosternum, or anterior pronotum. These are all muscles that are responsible for promoting (53a/b, 54, mcr) or remoting the fore coxae (55, 56) or trochanter (61a/b) (Fig. 9). While the dominant function of these muscels is to move the legs, it is possible that contraction of these muscles causes indirect head movement by depression of the propectus (53, 57, 61) or endosternum (54, 56), or flexion of the pronotum (55), thus linking movements of the forelegs to movements of the head. Certainly, these muscles provide substantial rigidity between the propectus, endosternum and coxae.

Bottom Line: We used serial sectioning combined with manual registration and segmentation of images to develop a comprehensive and detailed three-dimensional atlas of the honeybee head-neck system.This interactive atlas includes skeletal structures of the head and prothorax, the neck musculature, and the nervous system.The scope and resolution of the model exceeds atlases previously developed on similar sized animals, and the interactive nature of the model provides a far more accessible means of interpreting and comprehending insect anatomy and neuroanatomy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ARC Centre of Excellence in Vision Science, Division of Biomedical Science and Biochemistry, School of Biology, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Three-dimensional digital atlases are rapidly becoming indispensible in modern biology. We used serial sectioning combined with manual registration and segmentation of images to develop a comprehensive and detailed three-dimensional atlas of the honeybee head-neck system. This interactive atlas includes skeletal structures of the head and prothorax, the neck musculature, and the nervous system. The scope and resolution of the model exceeds atlases previously developed on similar sized animals, and the interactive nature of the model provides a far more accessible means of interpreting and comprehending insect anatomy and neuroanatomy.

Show MeSH