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Increasing support for contraception as HIV prevention: stakeholder mapping to identify influential individuals and their perceptions.

Petruney T, Harlan SV, Lanham M, Robinson ET - PLoS ONE (2010)

Bottom Line: We used a criteria-based approach to determine which HIV/AIDS stakeholders have the most significant impact on HIV/AIDS research, programs, funding and policy and stratified purposive sampling to conduct interviews with a subset of these individuals.The individuals we identified as having regional or international influence in the field of HIV/AIDS have the ability to leverage an increasingly conducive funding environment and a growing evidence base to address the policy, programmatic and operational challenges to integrating family planning with HIV/AIDS.Our findings can inform a targeted advocacy campaign.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Utilization, Family Health International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA. tpetruney@fhi.org

ABSTRACT

Background: Voluntary contraceptive use by HIV-positive women currently prevents more HIV-positive births, at a lower cost, than anti-retroviral drug (ARV) regimens. Despite this evidence, most prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) programs focus solely on providing ARV prophylaxis to pregnant women and rarely include the prevention of unintended pregnancies among HIV-positive women.

Methodology/principal findings: To strengthen support for family planning as HIV prevention, we systematically identified key individuals in the field of international HIV/AIDS-those who could potentially influence the issue-and sought to determine their perceptions of barriers to and facilitators for implementing this PMTCT strategy. We used a criteria-based approach to determine which HIV/AIDS stakeholders have the most significant impact on HIV/AIDS research, programs, funding and policy and stratified purposive sampling to conduct interviews with a subset of these individuals. The interview findings pointed to obstacles to strengthening linkages between family planning and HIV/AIDS, including the need for: resources to integrate family planning and HIV services, infrastructure or capacity to provide integrated services at the facility level, national leadership and coordination, and targeted advocacy to key decision-makers.

Conclusions/significance: The individuals we identified as having regional or international influence in the field of HIV/AIDS have the ability to leverage an increasingly conducive funding environment and a growing evidence base to address the policy, programmatic and operational challenges to integrating family planning with HIV/AIDS. Fostering greater support for implementing contraception for HIV prevention will require the dedication, collaboration and coordination of many such actors. Our findings can inform a targeted advocacy campaign.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

WHO/UNAIDS strategy for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (see [1]).Triangle added for emphasis by Family Health International.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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pone-0010781-g001: WHO/UNAIDS strategy for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (see [1]).Triangle added for emphasis by Family Health International.

Mentions: Ninety percent of new HIV infections among children under age 15 are a result of mother-to-child transmission [1]. To address this problem, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Joint Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) outlined a four-element strategy for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV (see Fig. 1).


Increasing support for contraception as HIV prevention: stakeholder mapping to identify influential individuals and their perceptions.

Petruney T, Harlan SV, Lanham M, Robinson ET - PLoS ONE (2010)

WHO/UNAIDS strategy for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (see [1]).Triangle added for emphasis by Family Health International.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2875395&req=5

pone-0010781-g001: WHO/UNAIDS strategy for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (see [1]).Triangle added for emphasis by Family Health International.
Mentions: Ninety percent of new HIV infections among children under age 15 are a result of mother-to-child transmission [1]. To address this problem, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Joint Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) outlined a four-element strategy for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV (see Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: We used a criteria-based approach to determine which HIV/AIDS stakeholders have the most significant impact on HIV/AIDS research, programs, funding and policy and stratified purposive sampling to conduct interviews with a subset of these individuals.The individuals we identified as having regional or international influence in the field of HIV/AIDS have the ability to leverage an increasingly conducive funding environment and a growing evidence base to address the policy, programmatic and operational challenges to integrating family planning with HIV/AIDS.Our findings can inform a targeted advocacy campaign.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Utilization, Family Health International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA. tpetruney@fhi.org

ABSTRACT

Background: Voluntary contraceptive use by HIV-positive women currently prevents more HIV-positive births, at a lower cost, than anti-retroviral drug (ARV) regimens. Despite this evidence, most prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) programs focus solely on providing ARV prophylaxis to pregnant women and rarely include the prevention of unintended pregnancies among HIV-positive women.

Methodology/principal findings: To strengthen support for family planning as HIV prevention, we systematically identified key individuals in the field of international HIV/AIDS-those who could potentially influence the issue-and sought to determine their perceptions of barriers to and facilitators for implementing this PMTCT strategy. We used a criteria-based approach to determine which HIV/AIDS stakeholders have the most significant impact on HIV/AIDS research, programs, funding and policy and stratified purposive sampling to conduct interviews with a subset of these individuals. The interview findings pointed to obstacles to strengthening linkages between family planning and HIV/AIDS, including the need for: resources to integrate family planning and HIV services, infrastructure or capacity to provide integrated services at the facility level, national leadership and coordination, and targeted advocacy to key decision-makers.

Conclusions/significance: The individuals we identified as having regional or international influence in the field of HIV/AIDS have the ability to leverage an increasingly conducive funding environment and a growing evidence base to address the policy, programmatic and operational challenges to integrating family planning with HIV/AIDS. Fostering greater support for implementing contraception for HIV prevention will require the dedication, collaboration and coordination of many such actors. Our findings can inform a targeted advocacy campaign.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus