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Efficacy of tart cherry juice in reducing muscle pain during running: a randomized controlled trial.

Kuehl KS, Perrier ET, Elliot DL, Chesnutt JC - J Int Soc Sports Nutr (2010)

Bottom Line: Endurance athletes use NSAIDs during competition to prevent or reduce pain, which carries the risk of adverse effects.This study aimed to assess the effects of tart cherry juice as compared to a placebo cherry drink on pain among runners in a long distance relay race.While both groups reported increased pain after the race, the cherry juice group reported a significantly smaller increase in pain (12 +/- 18 mm) compared to the placebo group (37 +/- 20 mm) (p < .001).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA, 97239. kuehlk@ohsu.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Long distance running causes acute muscle damage resulting in inflammation and decreased force production. Endurance athletes use NSAIDs during competition to prevent or reduce pain, which carries the risk of adverse effects. Tart cherries, rich in antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, may have a protective effect to reduce muscle damage and pain during strenuous exercise. This study aimed to assess the effects of tart cherry juice as compared to a placebo cherry drink on pain among runners in a long distance relay race.

Methods: The design was a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled trial. Fifty-four healthy runners (36 male, 18 female; 35.8 +/- 9.6 yrs) ran an average of 26.3 +/- 2.5 km over a 24 hour period. Participants ingested 355 mL bottles of tart cherry juice or placebo cherry drink twice daily for 7 days prior to the event and on the day of the race. Participants assessed level of pain on a standard 100 mm Visual Analog Scale (VAS) at baseline, before the race, and after the race.

Results: While both groups reported increased pain after the race, the cherry juice group reported a significantly smaller increase in pain (12 +/- 18 mm) compared to the placebo group (37 +/- 20 mm) (p < .001). Participants in the cherry juice group were more willing to use the drink in the future (p < 0.001) and reported higher satisfaction with the pain reduction they attributed to the drink (p < 0.001).

Conclusions: Ingesting tart cherry juice for 7 days prior to and during a strenuous running event can minimize post-run muscle pain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Consort diagram of enrolled participants.
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Figure 1: Consort diagram of enrolled participants.

Mentions: The design was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial among 54 runners participating in the Hood to Coast relay race (Figure 1). Each participant completed 3 running segments during the race, with individual segment distances ranging from 5.6 to 12.4 km and an average total running distance of 26.3 ± 2.5 km. Participants running on the same relay team were assigned to the same drink condition (n = 28 cherry; n = 26 placebo) in order to avoid participants inadvertently switching drinks during the study. Participants completed 3 data collection sessions: Day 1 - Baseline (7 days prior to race), Day 7 - Race Start, and Day 8 - Race End. At Baseline, participants were given 16-355 mL bottles of the drink (cherry juice or placebo) with instructions to consume two bottles daily prior to the race (14 bottles over 7 days), and two bottles during the race (total consumption: 16 bottles). Baseline data collection also included a health screening by a physician blinded to the participant's drink condition. Participants assessed their pain intensity during each visit on a standard 100 mm Visual Analog Scale (VAS), with 0 mm indicating 'no pain', and 100 mm indicating 'most severe pain'. The VAS has excellent reliability for acute pain [20] as well as well-defined thresholds for meaningful change in pain intensity [21]. After finishing the race (Day 8), participants completed the VAS pain scale and a short questionnaire reporting their level of satisfaction with the pain relief they attributed to the drink.


Efficacy of tart cherry juice in reducing muscle pain during running: a randomized controlled trial.

Kuehl KS, Perrier ET, Elliot DL, Chesnutt JC - J Int Soc Sports Nutr (2010)

Consort diagram of enrolled participants.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2874510&req=5

Figure 1: Consort diagram of enrolled participants.
Mentions: The design was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial among 54 runners participating in the Hood to Coast relay race (Figure 1). Each participant completed 3 running segments during the race, with individual segment distances ranging from 5.6 to 12.4 km and an average total running distance of 26.3 ± 2.5 km. Participants running on the same relay team were assigned to the same drink condition (n = 28 cherry; n = 26 placebo) in order to avoid participants inadvertently switching drinks during the study. Participants completed 3 data collection sessions: Day 1 - Baseline (7 days prior to race), Day 7 - Race Start, and Day 8 - Race End. At Baseline, participants were given 16-355 mL bottles of the drink (cherry juice or placebo) with instructions to consume two bottles daily prior to the race (14 bottles over 7 days), and two bottles during the race (total consumption: 16 bottles). Baseline data collection also included a health screening by a physician blinded to the participant's drink condition. Participants assessed their pain intensity during each visit on a standard 100 mm Visual Analog Scale (VAS), with 0 mm indicating 'no pain', and 100 mm indicating 'most severe pain'. The VAS has excellent reliability for acute pain [20] as well as well-defined thresholds for meaningful change in pain intensity [21]. After finishing the race (Day 8), participants completed the VAS pain scale and a short questionnaire reporting their level of satisfaction with the pain relief they attributed to the drink.

Bottom Line: Endurance athletes use NSAIDs during competition to prevent or reduce pain, which carries the risk of adverse effects.This study aimed to assess the effects of tart cherry juice as compared to a placebo cherry drink on pain among runners in a long distance relay race.While both groups reported increased pain after the race, the cherry juice group reported a significantly smaller increase in pain (12 +/- 18 mm) compared to the placebo group (37 +/- 20 mm) (p < .001).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA, 97239. kuehlk@ohsu.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Long distance running causes acute muscle damage resulting in inflammation and decreased force production. Endurance athletes use NSAIDs during competition to prevent or reduce pain, which carries the risk of adverse effects. Tart cherries, rich in antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, may have a protective effect to reduce muscle damage and pain during strenuous exercise. This study aimed to assess the effects of tart cherry juice as compared to a placebo cherry drink on pain among runners in a long distance relay race.

Methods: The design was a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled trial. Fifty-four healthy runners (36 male, 18 female; 35.8 +/- 9.6 yrs) ran an average of 26.3 +/- 2.5 km over a 24 hour period. Participants ingested 355 mL bottles of tart cherry juice or placebo cherry drink twice daily for 7 days prior to the event and on the day of the race. Participants assessed level of pain on a standard 100 mm Visual Analog Scale (VAS) at baseline, before the race, and after the race.

Results: While both groups reported increased pain after the race, the cherry juice group reported a significantly smaller increase in pain (12 +/- 18 mm) compared to the placebo group (37 +/- 20 mm) (p < .001). Participants in the cherry juice group were more willing to use the drink in the future (p < 0.001) and reported higher satisfaction with the pain reduction they attributed to the drink (p < 0.001).

Conclusions: Ingesting tart cherry juice for 7 days prior to and during a strenuous running event can minimize post-run muscle pain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus