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Hospitalizations for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 among Maori and Pacific Islanders, New Zealand.

Verrall A, Norton K, Rooker S, Dee S, Olsen L, Tan CE, Paull S, Allen R, Blackmore TK - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2010)

Bottom Line: Community transmission of influenza A pandemic (H1N1) 2009 was followed by high rates of hospital admissions in the Wellington region of New Zealand, particularly among Maori and Pacific Islanders.These findings may help health authorities anticipate the effects of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in other communities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Capital and Coast District Health Board, Wellington, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
Community transmission of influenza A pandemic (H1N1) 2009 was followed by high rates of hospital admissions in the Wellington region of New Zealand, particularly among Maori and Pacific Islanders. These findings may help health authorities anticipate the effects of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in other communities.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Number of hospitalizations for pandemic (H1N1) 2009, by date of admission, Wellington region, New Zealand, June–August 2009.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: Number of hospitalizations for pandemic (H1N1) 2009, by date of admission, Wellington region, New Zealand, June–August 2009.

Mentions: Testing for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 began on April 24, 2009, and local community transmission was detected in the Wellington region early in June. During June 8–August 31, pandemic (H1N1) 2009 was identified in 229 hospitalized case-patients. Hospitalizations began in June, peaked in July, and then declined rapidly (Figure 1). The mean age of admitted persons was 26 years (range 0–82 years); 62% were <30 years of age. A total of 117 (51%) admissions were under adult medical services, 79 (34%), under pediatric medical services, and 15 (7%), under obstetric services. Mean duration of admission was 6.1 days (range 0–24 days) and 111 (48%) patients stayed in hospital for <72 hours (Figure 2). Nineteen (8%) case-patients were admitted to intensive care or high dependency units for at least 1 night. Five (2%) case-patients died during their hospital stay; all of these deaths were attributed to pandemic (H1N1) 2009.


Hospitalizations for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 among Maori and Pacific Islanders, New Zealand.

Verrall A, Norton K, Rooker S, Dee S, Olsen L, Tan CE, Paull S, Allen R, Blackmore TK - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2010)

Number of hospitalizations for pandemic (H1N1) 2009, by date of admission, Wellington region, New Zealand, June–August 2009.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2874371&req=5

Figure 1: Number of hospitalizations for pandemic (H1N1) 2009, by date of admission, Wellington region, New Zealand, June–August 2009.
Mentions: Testing for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 began on April 24, 2009, and local community transmission was detected in the Wellington region early in June. During June 8–August 31, pandemic (H1N1) 2009 was identified in 229 hospitalized case-patients. Hospitalizations began in June, peaked in July, and then declined rapidly (Figure 1). The mean age of admitted persons was 26 years (range 0–82 years); 62% were <30 years of age. A total of 117 (51%) admissions were under adult medical services, 79 (34%), under pediatric medical services, and 15 (7%), under obstetric services. Mean duration of admission was 6.1 days (range 0–24 days) and 111 (48%) patients stayed in hospital for <72 hours (Figure 2). Nineteen (8%) case-patients were admitted to intensive care or high dependency units for at least 1 night. Five (2%) case-patients died during their hospital stay; all of these deaths were attributed to pandemic (H1N1) 2009.

Bottom Line: Community transmission of influenza A pandemic (H1N1) 2009 was followed by high rates of hospital admissions in the Wellington region of New Zealand, particularly among Maori and Pacific Islanders.These findings may help health authorities anticipate the effects of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in other communities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Capital and Coast District Health Board, Wellington, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
Community transmission of influenza A pandemic (H1N1) 2009 was followed by high rates of hospital admissions in the Wellington region of New Zealand, particularly among Maori and Pacific Islanders. These findings may help health authorities anticipate the effects of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 in other communities.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus