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Severe pneumonia associated with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, San Luis Potosí, Mexico.

Gómez-Gómez A, Magaña-Aquino M, Garcia-Sepúlveda C, Ochoa-Pérez UR, Falcón-Escobedo R, Comas-García A, Aranda-Romo S, Contreras-Treviño HI, Jimenéz-Rico PV, Banda-Barbosa MA, Dominguez-Paulin F, Bernal-Blanco JM, Peréz-González LF, Noyola DE - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2010)

Bottom Line: We describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of adults hospitalized with pneumonia during the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak.Eighteen patients were treated in the intensive care unit, and 10 died.During the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, severe pneumonia developed in young adults who had no identifiable risk factors; early diagnosis and treatment of influenza virus infections may have a determinant role in outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital Central Dr. Ignacio Morones Prieto, San Luis Potosi, Mexico. agomez.cer@prodigy.net.mx

ABSTRACT
We describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of adults hospitalized with pneumonia during the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak. Patients admitted to a general hospital in San Luis Potosí, Mexico, from April 10 through May 11, 2009, suspected to have influenza virus-associated pneumonia were evaluated. We identified 50 patients with suspected influenza pneumonia; the presence of influenza virus was confirmed in 18: 11 with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, 5 with unsubtypeable influenza A virus, 1 with seasonal influenza A virus (H3N2), and 1 in whom assay results for seasonal and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 viruses were positive. Eighteen patients were treated in the intensive care unit, and 10 died. During the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, severe pneumonia developed in young adults who had no identifiable risk factors; early diagnosis and treatment of influenza virus infections may have a determinant role in outcome.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Weekly number of acute respiratory infections (ARI) reported in the state of San Luis Potosí, Mexico (no. of cases × 100, light blue area); weekly number of ARI visits at the emergency department of Hospital Central “Dr. Ignacio Morones Prieto” (dark blue area); and weekly percentage of samples positive for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV; orange area) or influenza (red area), Virology Laboratory, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, during January 2008 through May 2009.
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Figure 1: Weekly number of acute respiratory infections (ARI) reported in the state of San Luis Potosí, Mexico (no. of cases × 100, light blue area); weekly number of ARI visits at the emergency department of Hospital Central “Dr. Ignacio Morones Prieto” (dark blue area); and weekly percentage of samples positive for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV; orange area) or influenza (red area), Virology Laboratory, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, during January 2008 through May 2009.

Mentions: An ARI outbreak was recorded in San Luis Potosí during April and May 2009. The most characteristic feature observed at the beginning of this outbreak was an increase in severe pneumonia cases requiring hospitalization of young adult patients. The Figure shows the epidemiologic curve of the weekly number of ARI cases reported to Servicios de Salud en el Estado de San Luis Potosí (state public health services) from January 2008 through May 2009 and the weekly number of ARI-related consultations provided in the ED at Hospital Central. In addition, the percentage of samples that were positive for influenza and RSV during each week at the Virology Laboratory UASLP is presented. Pneumonia patients included in this report were admitted during epidemiologic weeks 14 through 18 at a time that maximal pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus circulation was documented.


Severe pneumonia associated with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, San Luis Potosí, Mexico.

Gómez-Gómez A, Magaña-Aquino M, Garcia-Sepúlveda C, Ochoa-Pérez UR, Falcón-Escobedo R, Comas-García A, Aranda-Romo S, Contreras-Treviño HI, Jimenéz-Rico PV, Banda-Barbosa MA, Dominguez-Paulin F, Bernal-Blanco JM, Peréz-González LF, Noyola DE - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2010)

Weekly number of acute respiratory infections (ARI) reported in the state of San Luis Potosí, Mexico (no. of cases × 100, light blue area); weekly number of ARI visits at the emergency department of Hospital Central “Dr. Ignacio Morones Prieto” (dark blue area); and weekly percentage of samples positive for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV; orange area) or influenza (red area), Virology Laboratory, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, during January 2008 through May 2009.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2874369&req=5

Figure 1: Weekly number of acute respiratory infections (ARI) reported in the state of San Luis Potosí, Mexico (no. of cases × 100, light blue area); weekly number of ARI visits at the emergency department of Hospital Central “Dr. Ignacio Morones Prieto” (dark blue area); and weekly percentage of samples positive for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV; orange area) or influenza (red area), Virology Laboratory, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, during January 2008 through May 2009.
Mentions: An ARI outbreak was recorded in San Luis Potosí during April and May 2009. The most characteristic feature observed at the beginning of this outbreak was an increase in severe pneumonia cases requiring hospitalization of young adult patients. The Figure shows the epidemiologic curve of the weekly number of ARI cases reported to Servicios de Salud en el Estado de San Luis Potosí (state public health services) from January 2008 through May 2009 and the weekly number of ARI-related consultations provided in the ED at Hospital Central. In addition, the percentage of samples that were positive for influenza and RSV during each week at the Virology Laboratory UASLP is presented. Pneumonia patients included in this report were admitted during epidemiologic weeks 14 through 18 at a time that maximal pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus circulation was documented.

Bottom Line: We describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of adults hospitalized with pneumonia during the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak.Eighteen patients were treated in the intensive care unit, and 10 died.During the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, severe pneumonia developed in young adults who had no identifiable risk factors; early diagnosis and treatment of influenza virus infections may have a determinant role in outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital Central Dr. Ignacio Morones Prieto, San Luis Potosi, Mexico. agomez.cer@prodigy.net.mx

ABSTRACT
We describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of adults hospitalized with pneumonia during the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak. Patients admitted to a general hospital in San Luis Potosí, Mexico, from April 10 through May 11, 2009, suspected to have influenza virus-associated pneumonia were evaluated. We identified 50 patients with suspected influenza pneumonia; the presence of influenza virus was confirmed in 18: 11 with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, 5 with unsubtypeable influenza A virus, 1 with seasonal influenza A virus (H3N2), and 1 in whom assay results for seasonal and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 viruses were positive. Eighteen patients were treated in the intensive care unit, and 10 died. During the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, severe pneumonia developed in young adults who had no identifiable risk factors; early diagnosis and treatment of influenza virus infections may have a determinant role in outcome.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus