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Increase in plasma concentrations of geranylgeranoic Acid after turmeric tablet intake by healthy volunteers.

Mitake M, Ogawa H, Uebaba K, Shidoji Y - J Clin Biochem Nutr (2010)

Bottom Line: By using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, authentic GGA was eluted at a retention time of around 18 min as a negative ion of m/z 303.4.These results indicated that GGA in the turmeric tablet was absorbed as an intact form from intestinal mucosa.The present study provides a clue to conduct a research for cancer preventive roles of GGA in a number of spices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular and Cellular Biology, Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Siebold University of Nagasaki, Nagayo, Nagasaki 851-2195, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Geranylgeranoic acid (GGA) is one of the most potent cancer-preventive acyclic retinoids. GGA has been shown to induce cell death in human hepatoma-derived HuH-7 cells. We have recently reported the natural occurrence of GGA and its related compounds in several medicinal herbs such as turmeric, basil, rosehip, cinnamon and others [Shidoji and Ogawa, J. Lipid Res., 45: 1092-1103, 2004]. In the present study, we performed oral administration of turmeric tablets to healthy volunteers in order to investigate bioavailability of natural GGA. By using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, authentic GGA was eluted at a retention time of around 18 min as a negative ion of m/z 303.4. With healthy volunteers, plasma GGA was detected prior to the tablet intake and its concentrations were increased at 2 h after its intake and maintained at higher level until 4 h, suggesting an efficient bioavailability of preformed GGA in the turmeric tablets through oral administration. These results indicated that GGA in the turmeric tablet was absorbed as an intact form from intestinal mucosa. The present study provides a clue to conduct a research for cancer preventive roles of GGA in a number of spices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Changes in the concentrations of plasma GGA and ARA after oral administration of the turmeric tablets or cow milk. LC/MS analysis of plasma GGA and ARA was conducted as described in the “Materials and Methods” section. Time-dependent changes in plasma GGA and ARA concentrations after the intake of the turmeric tablets (A) or cow milk (B) were plotted as % of their each basal level of circulating GGA in individuals. Each symbol represents the mean ± SE (n = 4).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 3: Changes in the concentrations of plasma GGA and ARA after oral administration of the turmeric tablets or cow milk. LC/MS analysis of plasma GGA and ARA was conducted as described in the “Materials and Methods” section. Time-dependent changes in plasma GGA and ARA concentrations after the intake of the turmeric tablets (A) or cow milk (B) were plotted as % of their each basal level of circulating GGA in individuals. Each symbol represents the mean ± SE (n = 4).

Mentions: Because the basal levels (7.5 – 15.5 ng/ml) of plasma GGA were variable among the individual volunteers, time-dependent changes in plasma GGA and ARA concentrations after the intake of the turmeric tablet (Fig. 3A) or cow milk (Fig. 3B) were plotted as % of their each basal level. Plasma GGA concentrations were significantly increased in 2 h after the intake of the turmeric tablets and were maintained at higher level until 4 h, and returned to the basal levels at 8 h (Fig. 3A). Plasma concentrations of free ARA in the same plasmas, however, stayed unchanged after the turmeric intake.


Increase in plasma concentrations of geranylgeranoic Acid after turmeric tablet intake by healthy volunteers.

Mitake M, Ogawa H, Uebaba K, Shidoji Y - J Clin Biochem Nutr (2010)

Changes in the concentrations of plasma GGA and ARA after oral administration of the turmeric tablets or cow milk. LC/MS analysis of plasma GGA and ARA was conducted as described in the “Materials and Methods” section. Time-dependent changes in plasma GGA and ARA concentrations after the intake of the turmeric tablets (A) or cow milk (B) were plotted as % of their each basal level of circulating GGA in individuals. Each symbol represents the mean ± SE (n = 4).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2872231&req=5

Figure 3: Changes in the concentrations of plasma GGA and ARA after oral administration of the turmeric tablets or cow milk. LC/MS analysis of plasma GGA and ARA was conducted as described in the “Materials and Methods” section. Time-dependent changes in plasma GGA and ARA concentrations after the intake of the turmeric tablets (A) or cow milk (B) were plotted as % of their each basal level of circulating GGA in individuals. Each symbol represents the mean ± SE (n = 4).
Mentions: Because the basal levels (7.5 – 15.5 ng/ml) of plasma GGA were variable among the individual volunteers, time-dependent changes in plasma GGA and ARA concentrations after the intake of the turmeric tablet (Fig. 3A) or cow milk (Fig. 3B) were plotted as % of their each basal level. Plasma GGA concentrations were significantly increased in 2 h after the intake of the turmeric tablets and were maintained at higher level until 4 h, and returned to the basal levels at 8 h (Fig. 3A). Plasma concentrations of free ARA in the same plasmas, however, stayed unchanged after the turmeric intake.

Bottom Line: By using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, authentic GGA was eluted at a retention time of around 18 min as a negative ion of m/z 303.4.These results indicated that GGA in the turmeric tablet was absorbed as an intact form from intestinal mucosa.The present study provides a clue to conduct a research for cancer preventive roles of GGA in a number of spices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular and Cellular Biology, Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Siebold University of Nagasaki, Nagayo, Nagasaki 851-2195, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Geranylgeranoic acid (GGA) is one of the most potent cancer-preventive acyclic retinoids. GGA has been shown to induce cell death in human hepatoma-derived HuH-7 cells. We have recently reported the natural occurrence of GGA and its related compounds in several medicinal herbs such as turmeric, basil, rosehip, cinnamon and others [Shidoji and Ogawa, J. Lipid Res., 45: 1092-1103, 2004]. In the present study, we performed oral administration of turmeric tablets to healthy volunteers in order to investigate bioavailability of natural GGA. By using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, authentic GGA was eluted at a retention time of around 18 min as a negative ion of m/z 303.4. With healthy volunteers, plasma GGA was detected prior to the tablet intake and its concentrations were increased at 2 h after its intake and maintained at higher level until 4 h, suggesting an efficient bioavailability of preformed GGA in the turmeric tablets through oral administration. These results indicated that GGA in the turmeric tablet was absorbed as an intact form from intestinal mucosa. The present study provides a clue to conduct a research for cancer preventive roles of GGA in a number of spices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus