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Eucalyptus leaf extract suppresses the postprandial elevation of portal, cardiac and peripheral fructose concentrations after sucrose ingestion in rats.

Sugimoto K, Hosotani T, Kawasaki T, Nakagawa K, Hayashi S, Nakano Y, Inui H, Yamanouchi T - J Clin Biochem Nutr (2010)

Bottom Line: This increase was significantly lower in the ELE group.ELE suppressed postprandial hyperfructosemia in the portal, cardiac, and peripheral circulations.ELE may counteract glycation caused by high blood fructose concentrations induced by the consumption of fructose-containing foods or drinks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research and Development Center, Nagaoka Perfumery Co. Ltd., 1-3-30 Itsukaichi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0005, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Overintake of sucrose or fructose induces adiposity. Fructose undergoes a strong Maillard reaction, which worsens diabetic complications. To determine whether Eucalyptus globulus leaf extract (ELE) suppresses the postprandial elevation of serum fructose concentrations (SFCs) in the portal, cardiac, and peripheral blood after sucrose ingestion, we performed gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and measured SFC without any interference by contaminating glucose in the samples. Fasting Wistar rats were orally administered water (control group) or ELE (ELE group) before sucrose ingestion. Blood was collected from the portal vein, heart, and tail. The increase in the SFCs in the portal and cardiac samples 30 min after sucrose ingestion was lower in the ELE group than in the control group. The coefficient of correlation between the SFCs in the portal and cardiac samples was 0.825. The peripheral SFC in the control group progressively increased and was 146 micromol/L at 60 min. This increase was significantly lower in the ELE group. In contrast, the serum glucose concentrations in the 2 groups were similar. ELE suppressed postprandial hyperfructosemia in the portal, cardiac, and peripheral circulations. ELE may counteract glycation caused by high blood fructose concentrations induced by the consumption of fructose-containing foods or drinks.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Eucalyptus leaf extract (ELE) suppresses the postprandial elevation of serum fructose concentrations in samples derived from portal (A) and cardiac (B) blood and does not affect the glucose concentrations (C and D) after a sucrose-tolerance test in rats (Study 1). Mean (SD) fructose and glucose concentrations in the portal and cardiac samples in the control (open circles) and ELE (closed circles) groups. Fasting rats (n = 31) were orally administered water (control group) or ELE at a dose of 1 g/kg body weight (ELE group) prior to the ingestion of sucrose (2 g/kg body weight). The fructose and glucose concentrations in the portal and cardiac samples were determined.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: Eucalyptus leaf extract (ELE) suppresses the postprandial elevation of serum fructose concentrations in samples derived from portal (A) and cardiac (B) blood and does not affect the glucose concentrations (C and D) after a sucrose-tolerance test in rats (Study 1). Mean (SD) fructose and glucose concentrations in the portal and cardiac samples in the control (open circles) and ELE (closed circles) groups. Fasting rats (n = 31) were orally administered water (control group) or ELE at a dose of 1 g/kg body weight (ELE group) prior to the ingestion of sucrose (2 g/kg body weight). The fructose and glucose concentrations in the portal and cardiac samples were determined.

Mentions: As shown in Fig. 1, the fasting SFCs in the samples derived from portal (A) and cardiac blood (B) were 114 ± 77 µmol/L and 19.8 ± 7.0 µmol/L, respectively. In the control group, after oral sucrose administration, the SFC in the samples derived from portal blood increased transiently, peaked at 30 min, and then decreased. These changes were consistent with the changes in the SFC in the samples derived from cardiac blood, except that the SFC in the cardiac samples at 30 min was considerably lower than that in the portal samples. In the ELE group, the increase in the SFC in the portal samples was significantly lower than that in the control group (p<0.05), and the inhibition ratio at 30 min was 53%. The SFC in the cardiac samples was also lower than that in case of the control group, but not significantly so. The correlation between the SFCs in the portal and cardiac samples is shown in Fig. 2. The coefficient of correlation between these variables (n = 31) was 0.825. The changes in the serum glucose concentrations in both portal and cardiac samples during the sucrose-tolerance test were similar in the 2 groups (Fig. 1C and D).


Eucalyptus leaf extract suppresses the postprandial elevation of portal, cardiac and peripheral fructose concentrations after sucrose ingestion in rats.

Sugimoto K, Hosotani T, Kawasaki T, Nakagawa K, Hayashi S, Nakano Y, Inui H, Yamanouchi T - J Clin Biochem Nutr (2010)

Eucalyptus leaf extract (ELE) suppresses the postprandial elevation of serum fructose concentrations in samples derived from portal (A) and cardiac (B) blood and does not affect the glucose concentrations (C and D) after a sucrose-tolerance test in rats (Study 1). Mean (SD) fructose and glucose concentrations in the portal and cardiac samples in the control (open circles) and ELE (closed circles) groups. Fasting rats (n = 31) were orally administered water (control group) or ELE at a dose of 1 g/kg body weight (ELE group) prior to the ingestion of sucrose (2 g/kg body weight). The fructose and glucose concentrations in the portal and cardiac samples were determined.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2872225&req=5

Figure 1: Eucalyptus leaf extract (ELE) suppresses the postprandial elevation of serum fructose concentrations in samples derived from portal (A) and cardiac (B) blood and does not affect the glucose concentrations (C and D) after a sucrose-tolerance test in rats (Study 1). Mean (SD) fructose and glucose concentrations in the portal and cardiac samples in the control (open circles) and ELE (closed circles) groups. Fasting rats (n = 31) were orally administered water (control group) or ELE at a dose of 1 g/kg body weight (ELE group) prior to the ingestion of sucrose (2 g/kg body weight). The fructose and glucose concentrations in the portal and cardiac samples were determined.
Mentions: As shown in Fig. 1, the fasting SFCs in the samples derived from portal (A) and cardiac blood (B) were 114 ± 77 µmol/L and 19.8 ± 7.0 µmol/L, respectively. In the control group, after oral sucrose administration, the SFC in the samples derived from portal blood increased transiently, peaked at 30 min, and then decreased. These changes were consistent with the changes in the SFC in the samples derived from cardiac blood, except that the SFC in the cardiac samples at 30 min was considerably lower than that in the portal samples. In the ELE group, the increase in the SFC in the portal samples was significantly lower than that in the control group (p<0.05), and the inhibition ratio at 30 min was 53%. The SFC in the cardiac samples was also lower than that in case of the control group, but not significantly so. The correlation between the SFCs in the portal and cardiac samples is shown in Fig. 2. The coefficient of correlation between these variables (n = 31) was 0.825. The changes in the serum glucose concentrations in both portal and cardiac samples during the sucrose-tolerance test were similar in the 2 groups (Fig. 1C and D).

Bottom Line: This increase was significantly lower in the ELE group.ELE suppressed postprandial hyperfructosemia in the portal, cardiac, and peripheral circulations.ELE may counteract glycation caused by high blood fructose concentrations induced by the consumption of fructose-containing foods or drinks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research and Development Center, Nagaoka Perfumery Co. Ltd., 1-3-30 Itsukaichi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0005, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Overintake of sucrose or fructose induces adiposity. Fructose undergoes a strong Maillard reaction, which worsens diabetic complications. To determine whether Eucalyptus globulus leaf extract (ELE) suppresses the postprandial elevation of serum fructose concentrations (SFCs) in the portal, cardiac, and peripheral blood after sucrose ingestion, we performed gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and measured SFC without any interference by contaminating glucose in the samples. Fasting Wistar rats were orally administered water (control group) or ELE (ELE group) before sucrose ingestion. Blood was collected from the portal vein, heart, and tail. The increase in the SFCs in the portal and cardiac samples 30 min after sucrose ingestion was lower in the ELE group than in the control group. The coefficient of correlation between the SFCs in the portal and cardiac samples was 0.825. The peripheral SFC in the control group progressively increased and was 146 micromol/L at 60 min. This increase was significantly lower in the ELE group. In contrast, the serum glucose concentrations in the 2 groups were similar. ELE suppressed postprandial hyperfructosemia in the portal, cardiac, and peripheral circulations. ELE may counteract glycation caused by high blood fructose concentrations induced by the consumption of fructose-containing foods or drinks.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus