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Patterns of neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury.

de Vries LS, Groenendaal F - Neuroradiology (2010)

Bottom Line: Enormous progress has been made in assessing the neonatal brain, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).In this review, we will describe the use of MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in detecting different patterns of brain injury in (full-term) human neonates following hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and indicate the relevance of these findings in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. l.s.devries@umcutrecht.nl

ABSTRACT
Enormous progress has been made in assessing the neonatal brain, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this review, we will describe the use of MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in detecting different patterns of brain injury in (full-term) human neonates following hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and indicate the relevance of these findings in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Chemical shift imaging a neonate with a large stroke in the territory of the right middle cerebral artery (a). In the infarcted area, NAA concentration is decreased (b, red), whereas Lac/NAA ratio is increased (c, yellow)
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Fig9: Chemical shift imaging a neonate with a large stroke in the territory of the right middle cerebral artery (a). In the infarcted area, NAA concentration is decreased (b, red), whereas Lac/NAA ratio is increased (c, yellow)

Mentions: In addition, chemical shift imaging enables us to measure metabolites in a matrix of voxels overlying the brain. Thereby, localised elevations of lactate can be demonstrated [79]. An example of this is given in Fig. 9, where 1H-MRS chemical shift imaging is presented of a neonate with a large infarct in the territory of the right middle cerebral artery.Fig. 9


Patterns of neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury.

de Vries LS, Groenendaal F - Neuroradiology (2010)

Chemical shift imaging a neonate with a large stroke in the territory of the right middle cerebral artery (a). In the infarcted area, NAA concentration is decreased (b, red), whereas Lac/NAA ratio is increased (c, yellow)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2872019&req=5

Fig9: Chemical shift imaging a neonate with a large stroke in the territory of the right middle cerebral artery (a). In the infarcted area, NAA concentration is decreased (b, red), whereas Lac/NAA ratio is increased (c, yellow)
Mentions: In addition, chemical shift imaging enables us to measure metabolites in a matrix of voxels overlying the brain. Thereby, localised elevations of lactate can be demonstrated [79]. An example of this is given in Fig. 9, where 1H-MRS chemical shift imaging is presented of a neonate with a large infarct in the territory of the right middle cerebral artery.Fig. 9

Bottom Line: Enormous progress has been made in assessing the neonatal brain, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).In this review, we will describe the use of MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in detecting different patterns of brain injury in (full-term) human neonates following hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and indicate the relevance of these findings in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. l.s.devries@umcutrecht.nl

ABSTRACT
Enormous progress has been made in assessing the neonatal brain, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this review, we will describe the use of MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in detecting different patterns of brain injury in (full-term) human neonates following hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and indicate the relevance of these findings in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus