Limits...
Patterns of neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury.

de Vries LS, Groenendaal F - Neuroradiology (2010)

Bottom Line: Enormous progress has been made in assessing the neonatal brain, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).In this review, we will describe the use of MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in detecting different patterns of brain injury in (full-term) human neonates following hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and indicate the relevance of these findings in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. l.s.devries@umcutrecht.nl

ABSTRACT
Enormous progress has been made in assessing the neonatal brain, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this review, we will describe the use of MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in detecting different patterns of brain injury in (full-term) human neonates following hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and indicate the relevance of these findings in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Full-term infant with punctate white matter lesions seen as low signal intensity changes on T2SE (TR 6284/TE 120) and as areas of restricted diffusion on DWI. There is also mild involvement of the corpus callosum and PLIC, seen on DWI
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2872019&req=5

Fig5: Full-term infant with punctate white matter lesions seen as low signal intensity changes on T2SE (TR 6284/TE 120) and as areas of restricted diffusion on DWI. There is also mild involvement of the corpus callosum and PLIC, seen on DWI

Mentions: Another pattern of brain injury consists of “lesions restricted to the periventricular white matter”, not dissimilar from the so-called punctate white matter lesions in the preterm infant (Fig. 5). Li et al. [37] diagnosed this pattern of injury in 23% of their infants and pointed out that infants with this type of injury are significantly less mature with a milder degree of encephalopathy and fewer clinical seizures relative to other newborns in their cohort, who were diagnosed to have the two more common patterns of injury. This pattern of brain injury is also seen in newborn infants with congenital heart defects [38].Fig. 5


Patterns of neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury.

de Vries LS, Groenendaal F - Neuroradiology (2010)

Full-term infant with punctate white matter lesions seen as low signal intensity changes on T2SE (TR 6284/TE 120) and as areas of restricted diffusion on DWI. There is also mild involvement of the corpus callosum and PLIC, seen on DWI
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2872019&req=5

Fig5: Full-term infant with punctate white matter lesions seen as low signal intensity changes on T2SE (TR 6284/TE 120) and as areas of restricted diffusion on DWI. There is also mild involvement of the corpus callosum and PLIC, seen on DWI
Mentions: Another pattern of brain injury consists of “lesions restricted to the periventricular white matter”, not dissimilar from the so-called punctate white matter lesions in the preterm infant (Fig. 5). Li et al. [37] diagnosed this pattern of injury in 23% of their infants and pointed out that infants with this type of injury are significantly less mature with a milder degree of encephalopathy and fewer clinical seizures relative to other newborns in their cohort, who were diagnosed to have the two more common patterns of injury. This pattern of brain injury is also seen in newborn infants with congenital heart defects [38].Fig. 5

Bottom Line: Enormous progress has been made in assessing the neonatal brain, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).In this review, we will describe the use of MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in detecting different patterns of brain injury in (full-term) human neonates following hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and indicate the relevance of these findings in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. l.s.devries@umcutrecht.nl

ABSTRACT
Enormous progress has been made in assessing the neonatal brain, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this review, we will describe the use of MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in detecting different patterns of brain injury in (full-term) human neonates following hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and indicate the relevance of these findings in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus