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Taxonomic distinctness of demersal fishes of the California current: moving beyond simple measures of diversity for marine ecosystem-based management.

Tolimieri N, Anderson MJ - PLoS ONE (2010)

Bottom Line: The classic pattern is for diversity (e.g., species richness) to decrease with increasing latitude.AvTD increased with latitude on the shelf (50-150 m) but tended to decrease with latitude at deeper depths.These trends contrast to some extent the patterns seen in earlier studies for species richness and evenness in demersal fishes along this coast and add to our understanding of diversity of the demersal fishes of the California Current.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, Washington, United States of America. nick.tolimieri@noaa.gov

ABSTRACT

Background: Large-scale patterns or trends in species diversity have long interested ecologists. The classic pattern is for diversity (e.g., species richness) to decrease with increasing latitude. Taxonomic distinctness is a diversity measure based on the relatedness of the species within a sample. Here we examined patterns of taxonomic distinctness in relation to latitude (ca. 32-48 degrees N) and depth (ca. 50-1220 m) for demersal fishes on the continental shelf and slope of the US Pacific coast.

Methodology/principal findings: Both average taxonomic distinctness (AvTD) and variation in taxonomic distinctness (VarTD) changed with latitude and depth. AvTD was highest at approximately 500 m and lowest at around 200 m bottom depth. Latitudinal trends in AvTD were somewhat weaker and were depth-specific. AvTD increased with latitude on the shelf (50-150 m) but tended to decrease with latitude at deeper depths. Variation in taxonomic distinctness (VarTD) was highest around 300 m. As with AvTD, latitudinal trends in VarTD were depth-specific. On the shelf (50-150 m), VarTD increased with latitude, while in deeper areas the patterns were more complex. Closer inspection of the data showed that the number and distribution of species within the class Chondrichthyes were the primary drivers of the overall patterns seen in AvTD and VarTD, while the relatedness and distribution of species in the order Scorpaeniformes appeared to cause the relatively low observed values of AvTD at around 200 m.

Conclusions/significance: These trends contrast to some extent the patterns seen in earlier studies for species richness and evenness in demersal fishes along this coast and add to our understanding of diversity of the demersal fishes of the California Current.

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VarTD versus depth and latitude.VarTDdiff (A) Scorpaeniformes, (B) Pleuronectiformes, (C) Perciformes, (D) Gadiformes, (E) Chondrichthyes, and (F) VarTD for Actinopterygii only. All GAMs are significant at the α = 0.05 level.
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pone-0010653-g008: VarTD versus depth and latitude.VarTDdiff (A) Scorpaeniformes, (B) Pleuronectiformes, (C) Perciformes, (D) Gadiformes, (E) Chondrichthyes, and (F) VarTD for Actinopterygii only. All GAMs are significant at the α = 0.05 level.

Mentions: Based on the analysis of the taxonomic trees, we chose to examine the effect on AvTD of removing five taxa: Scorpaeniformes, Pleuronectiformes, Gadiformes, Perciformes and the Chondrichthyes. AvTDdiff and VarTDdiff for all five taxa showed significant depth x latitude interactions (Fig. 7 & 8, GAM, p<0.05 for all). For brevity, we do not present full GAM results for each taxon but give only the r2 for each model.


Taxonomic distinctness of demersal fishes of the California current: moving beyond simple measures of diversity for marine ecosystem-based management.

Tolimieri N, Anderson MJ - PLoS ONE (2010)

VarTD versus depth and latitude.VarTDdiff (A) Scorpaeniformes, (B) Pleuronectiformes, (C) Perciformes, (D) Gadiformes, (E) Chondrichthyes, and (F) VarTD for Actinopterygii only. All GAMs are significant at the α = 0.05 level.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2871800&req=5

pone-0010653-g008: VarTD versus depth and latitude.VarTDdiff (A) Scorpaeniformes, (B) Pleuronectiformes, (C) Perciformes, (D) Gadiformes, (E) Chondrichthyes, and (F) VarTD for Actinopterygii only. All GAMs are significant at the α = 0.05 level.
Mentions: Based on the analysis of the taxonomic trees, we chose to examine the effect on AvTD of removing five taxa: Scorpaeniformes, Pleuronectiformes, Gadiformes, Perciformes and the Chondrichthyes. AvTDdiff and VarTDdiff for all five taxa showed significant depth x latitude interactions (Fig. 7 & 8, GAM, p<0.05 for all). For brevity, we do not present full GAM results for each taxon but give only the r2 for each model.

Bottom Line: The classic pattern is for diversity (e.g., species richness) to decrease with increasing latitude.AvTD increased with latitude on the shelf (50-150 m) but tended to decrease with latitude at deeper depths.These trends contrast to some extent the patterns seen in earlier studies for species richness and evenness in demersal fishes along this coast and add to our understanding of diversity of the demersal fishes of the California Current.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, Washington, United States of America. nick.tolimieri@noaa.gov

ABSTRACT

Background: Large-scale patterns or trends in species diversity have long interested ecologists. The classic pattern is for diversity (e.g., species richness) to decrease with increasing latitude. Taxonomic distinctness is a diversity measure based on the relatedness of the species within a sample. Here we examined patterns of taxonomic distinctness in relation to latitude (ca. 32-48 degrees N) and depth (ca. 50-1220 m) for demersal fishes on the continental shelf and slope of the US Pacific coast.

Methodology/principal findings: Both average taxonomic distinctness (AvTD) and variation in taxonomic distinctness (VarTD) changed with latitude and depth. AvTD was highest at approximately 500 m and lowest at around 200 m bottom depth. Latitudinal trends in AvTD were somewhat weaker and were depth-specific. AvTD increased with latitude on the shelf (50-150 m) but tended to decrease with latitude at deeper depths. Variation in taxonomic distinctness (VarTD) was highest around 300 m. As with AvTD, latitudinal trends in VarTD were depth-specific. On the shelf (50-150 m), VarTD increased with latitude, while in deeper areas the patterns were more complex. Closer inspection of the data showed that the number and distribution of species within the class Chondrichthyes were the primary drivers of the overall patterns seen in AvTD and VarTD, while the relatedness and distribution of species in the order Scorpaeniformes appeared to cause the relatively low observed values of AvTD at around 200 m.

Conclusions/significance: These trends contrast to some extent the patterns seen in earlier studies for species richness and evenness in demersal fishes along this coast and add to our understanding of diversity of the demersal fishes of the California Current.

Show MeSH