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Dielectrophoresis: a review of applications for stem cell research.

Pethig R, Menachery A, Pells S, De Sousa P - J. Biomed. Biotechnol. (2010)

Bottom Line: Demonstrated capabilities include the enrichment of haematopoetic stem cells from bone marrow and peripheral blood, and adult stem cells from adipose tissue.Recent research suggests that this technique can predict the ultimate fate of neural stem cells after differentiation before the appearance of specific cell-surface proteins.This review summarises the properties of cells that contribute to their dielectrophoretic behaviour, and their relevance to stem cell research and translational applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Integrated Micro and Nano Systems, Joint Research Institute for Integrated Systems, School of Engineering, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JF, UK. ron.pethig@ed.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
Dielectrophoresis can discriminate distinct cellular identities in heterogeneous populations, and monitor cell state changes associated with activation and clonal expansion, apoptosis, and necrosis, without the need for biochemical labels. Demonstrated capabilities include the enrichment of haematopoetic stem cells from bone marrow and peripheral blood, and adult stem cells from adipose tissue. Recent research suggests that this technique can predict the ultimate fate of neural stem cells after differentiation before the appearance of specific cell-surface proteins. This review summarises the properties of cells that contribute to their dielectrophoretic behaviour, and their relevance to stem cell research and translational applications.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The cytoplasmic membrane exhibits an electrical capacitance, whose value per unit membrane area is proportional to such structural features as membrane folding, microvilli, and blebs, for example. As indicated in this theoretical modelling, and demonstrated experimentally [4–6], changes in membrane surface features result in a shift of the DEP cross-over frequency fxo1. The example shown here, for typical membrane capacitance values, demonstrates the change expected for a doubling of the effective surface “roughness” of the membrane.
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fig3: The cytoplasmic membrane exhibits an electrical capacitance, whose value per unit membrane area is proportional to such structural features as membrane folding, microvilli, and blebs, for example. As indicated in this theoretical modelling, and demonstrated experimentally [4–6], changes in membrane surface features result in a shift of the DEP cross-over frequency fxo1. The example shown here, for typical membrane capacitance values, demonstrates the change expected for a doubling of the effective surface “roughness” of the membrane.

Mentions: (4)fxo1=22πrCmσs. This equation assumes that the high resistance value of the cell membrane has not been impaired due to damage or the onset of cell death, for example, [4–6]. For a fixed cell radius, the effective membrane capacitance of a smooth cell will be less than that for a cell having a complex cell surface topography associated with the presence of microvilli, blebs, membrane folds, or ruffles, for example. This will influence the value observed for fxo1, and this effect is shown in Figure 3. An important practical application of the influence of cell size and membrane capacitance on the dielectric polarisability of a cell has recently been demonstrated by Holmes et al. [17], in the form of a microfluidic cytometer that counts white leukocytes and assigns them into the major subtypes on the basis of their electrical impedance (a measure of the membrane capacitance and effective conductance of a cell).


Dielectrophoresis: a review of applications for stem cell research.

Pethig R, Menachery A, Pells S, De Sousa P - J. Biomed. Biotechnol. (2010)

The cytoplasmic membrane exhibits an electrical capacitance, whose value per unit membrane area is proportional to such structural features as membrane folding, microvilli, and blebs, for example. As indicated in this theoretical modelling, and demonstrated experimentally [4–6], changes in membrane surface features result in a shift of the DEP cross-over frequency fxo1. The example shown here, for typical membrane capacitance values, demonstrates the change expected for a doubling of the effective surface “roughness” of the membrane.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2871555&req=5

fig3: The cytoplasmic membrane exhibits an electrical capacitance, whose value per unit membrane area is proportional to such structural features as membrane folding, microvilli, and blebs, for example. As indicated in this theoretical modelling, and demonstrated experimentally [4–6], changes in membrane surface features result in a shift of the DEP cross-over frequency fxo1. The example shown here, for typical membrane capacitance values, demonstrates the change expected for a doubling of the effective surface “roughness” of the membrane.
Mentions: (4)fxo1=22πrCmσs. This equation assumes that the high resistance value of the cell membrane has not been impaired due to damage or the onset of cell death, for example, [4–6]. For a fixed cell radius, the effective membrane capacitance of a smooth cell will be less than that for a cell having a complex cell surface topography associated with the presence of microvilli, blebs, membrane folds, or ruffles, for example. This will influence the value observed for fxo1, and this effect is shown in Figure 3. An important practical application of the influence of cell size and membrane capacitance on the dielectric polarisability of a cell has recently been demonstrated by Holmes et al. [17], in the form of a microfluidic cytometer that counts white leukocytes and assigns them into the major subtypes on the basis of their electrical impedance (a measure of the membrane capacitance and effective conductance of a cell).

Bottom Line: Demonstrated capabilities include the enrichment of haematopoetic stem cells from bone marrow and peripheral blood, and adult stem cells from adipose tissue.Recent research suggests that this technique can predict the ultimate fate of neural stem cells after differentiation before the appearance of specific cell-surface proteins.This review summarises the properties of cells that contribute to their dielectrophoretic behaviour, and their relevance to stem cell research and translational applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Integrated Micro and Nano Systems, Joint Research Institute for Integrated Systems, School of Engineering, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JF, UK. ron.pethig@ed.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
Dielectrophoresis can discriminate distinct cellular identities in heterogeneous populations, and monitor cell state changes associated with activation and clonal expansion, apoptosis, and necrosis, without the need for biochemical labels. Demonstrated capabilities include the enrichment of haematopoetic stem cells from bone marrow and peripheral blood, and adult stem cells from adipose tissue. Recent research suggests that this technique can predict the ultimate fate of neural stem cells after differentiation before the appearance of specific cell-surface proteins. This review summarises the properties of cells that contribute to their dielectrophoretic behaviour, and their relevance to stem cell research and translational applications.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus