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Sedation and anesthesia options for pediatric patients in the radiation oncology suite.

Harris EA - Int J Pediatr (2010)

Bottom Line: We will then examine several currently used regimens for the provision of pediatric sedation in the XRT suite as well as a discussion of when and how general anesthesia should be performed if deemed necessary.Standards of care with respect to patient monitoring will be addressed.We will conclude with a survey of the developing field of radiation-based therapy administered outside of the XRT suite.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine, and Pain Management, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, 2574 Mayfair Lane, Weston, FL 33327-1506, USA.

ABSTRACT
External beam radiation therapy (XRT) has become one of the cornerstones in the management of pediatric oncology cases. While the procedure itself is painless, the anxiety it causes may necessitate the provision of sedation or anesthesia for the patient. This review paper will briefly review the XRT procedure itself so that the anesthesia provider has an understanding of what is occurring during the simulation and treatment phases. We will then examine several currently used regimens for the provision of pediatric sedation in the XRT suite as well as a discussion of when and how general anesthesia should be performed if deemed necessary. Standards of care with respect to patient monitoring will be addressed. We will conclude with a survey of the developing field of radiation-based therapy administered outside of the XRT suite.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A premolded aquaplast.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2871531&req=5

fig3: A premolded aquaplast.

Mentions: Plaster immobilization casts of the head (Aquaplast RT™, Q-Fix, Avondale PA, Figure 3) and/or body (Alpha Cradle, Smithers Medical Products Inc., North Canton OH, Figure 4) are made, depending upon the sites that are to be treated. These casts make certain that the child will not move during the treatment sessions, ensuring that the radiation is directed at its target and not at normal surrounding tissue. Inadequate immobilization can result in treatment failure [7, 8] as well as damage to normal tissue [9].


Sedation and anesthesia options for pediatric patients in the radiation oncology suite.

Harris EA - Int J Pediatr (2010)

A premolded aquaplast.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2871531&req=5

fig3: A premolded aquaplast.
Mentions: Plaster immobilization casts of the head (Aquaplast RT™, Q-Fix, Avondale PA, Figure 3) and/or body (Alpha Cradle, Smithers Medical Products Inc., North Canton OH, Figure 4) are made, depending upon the sites that are to be treated. These casts make certain that the child will not move during the treatment sessions, ensuring that the radiation is directed at its target and not at normal surrounding tissue. Inadequate immobilization can result in treatment failure [7, 8] as well as damage to normal tissue [9].

Bottom Line: We will then examine several currently used regimens for the provision of pediatric sedation in the XRT suite as well as a discussion of when and how general anesthesia should be performed if deemed necessary.Standards of care with respect to patient monitoring will be addressed.We will conclude with a survey of the developing field of radiation-based therapy administered outside of the XRT suite.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine, and Pain Management, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, 2574 Mayfair Lane, Weston, FL 33327-1506, USA.

ABSTRACT
External beam radiation therapy (XRT) has become one of the cornerstones in the management of pediatric oncology cases. While the procedure itself is painless, the anxiety it causes may necessitate the provision of sedation or anesthesia for the patient. This review paper will briefly review the XRT procedure itself so that the anesthesia provider has an understanding of what is occurring during the simulation and treatment phases. We will then examine several currently used regimens for the provision of pediatric sedation in the XRT suite as well as a discussion of when and how general anesthesia should be performed if deemed necessary. Standards of care with respect to patient monitoring will be addressed. We will conclude with a survey of the developing field of radiation-based therapy administered outside of the XRT suite.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus