Limits...
Top dogs: wolf domestication and wealth.

Driscoll CA, Macdonald DW - J. Biol. (2010)

Bottom Line: A phylogeographic analysis of gene sequences important in determining body size in dogs, recently published in BMC Biology, traces the appearance of small body size to the Neolithic Middle East.This finding strengthens the association of this event with the development of sedentary societies, and perhaps even has implications for the inception of human social inequality.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, The Recanati-Kaplan Centre, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Tubney House, Abingdon Road, Tubney, Abingdon OX135QL, UK.

ABSTRACT
A phylogeographic analysis of gene sequences important in determining body size in dogs, recently published in BMC Biology, traces the appearance of small body size to the Neolithic Middle East. This finding strengthens the association of this event with the development of sedentary societies, and perhaps even has implications for the inception of human social inequality.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

That at least some people, and often trend-setters, have long valued dogs is reflected in their prominence in art from Neolithic times to the present. In this case, Ruebens pictures Diana (Artemis) the goddess of hunting, with a hound center stage.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2871521&req=5

Figure 3: That at least some people, and often trend-setters, have long valued dogs is reflected in their prominence in art from Neolithic times to the present. In this case, Ruebens pictures Diana (Artemis) the goddess of hunting, with a hound center stage.

Mentions: Moreover, as property, dogs are likely to have become status symbols as well as being intrinsically valuable. Indeed, the recent radiation of modern breeds in the Victorian era followed lines of class and wealth, and may be a modern example of the process. Thus, despite the fact that in many contemporary indigenous societies dogs appear to be only loosely owned and little valued, it does not seem implausible that early dogs were valued by their companion humans. Such value would make them objects of inter-generational wealth, and hence qualify as a vehicle for inequality. The fact that contemporary primitive societies often treat dogs badly does not mean that some individuals do (and did) not value them, and to judge by their depictions alongside goddesses like Rubens' Diana (Figure 3), one might guess that some of the people that valued them were trend-setters!


Top dogs: wolf domestication and wealth.

Driscoll CA, Macdonald DW - J. Biol. (2010)

That at least some people, and often trend-setters, have long valued dogs is reflected in their prominence in art from Neolithic times to the present. In this case, Ruebens pictures Diana (Artemis) the goddess of hunting, with a hound center stage.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2871521&req=5

Figure 3: That at least some people, and often trend-setters, have long valued dogs is reflected in their prominence in art from Neolithic times to the present. In this case, Ruebens pictures Diana (Artemis) the goddess of hunting, with a hound center stage.
Mentions: Moreover, as property, dogs are likely to have become status symbols as well as being intrinsically valuable. Indeed, the recent radiation of modern breeds in the Victorian era followed lines of class and wealth, and may be a modern example of the process. Thus, despite the fact that in many contemporary indigenous societies dogs appear to be only loosely owned and little valued, it does not seem implausible that early dogs were valued by their companion humans. Such value would make them objects of inter-generational wealth, and hence qualify as a vehicle for inequality. The fact that contemporary primitive societies often treat dogs badly does not mean that some individuals do (and did) not value them, and to judge by their depictions alongside goddesses like Rubens' Diana (Figure 3), one might guess that some of the people that valued them were trend-setters!

Bottom Line: A phylogeographic analysis of gene sequences important in determining body size in dogs, recently published in BMC Biology, traces the appearance of small body size to the Neolithic Middle East.This finding strengthens the association of this event with the development of sedentary societies, and perhaps even has implications for the inception of human social inequality.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, The Recanati-Kaplan Centre, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Tubney House, Abingdon Road, Tubney, Abingdon OX135QL, UK.

ABSTRACT
A phylogeographic analysis of gene sequences important in determining body size in dogs, recently published in BMC Biology, traces the appearance of small body size to the Neolithic Middle East. This finding strengthens the association of this event with the development of sedentary societies, and perhaps even has implications for the inception of human social inequality.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus