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Top dogs: wolf domestication and wealth.

Driscoll CA, Macdonald DW - J. Biol. (2010)

Bottom Line: A phylogeographic analysis of gene sequences important in determining body size in dogs, recently published in BMC Biology, traces the appearance of small body size to the Neolithic Middle East.This finding strengthens the association of this event with the development of sedentary societies, and perhaps even has implications for the inception of human social inequality.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, The Recanati-Kaplan Centre, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Tubney House, Abingdon Road, Tubney, Abingdon OX135QL, UK.

ABSTRACT
A phylogeographic analysis of gene sequences important in determining body size in dogs, recently published in BMC Biology, traces the appearance of small body size to the Neolithic Middle East. This finding strengthens the association of this event with the development of sedentary societies, and perhaps even has implications for the inception of human social inequality.

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Petroglyphs from Drakensbergs of South Africa illustrating an early hunt with dogs in a manner perhaps analogous to that of the earliest hunter gatherers. Picture used with permission from Vinnicombe P. 1979. People of the Eland: Rock paintings of the Drakenbergs Bushmen as a reflection of their life and thought. Pietermaritzberg: University of Natal Press.
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Figure 1: Petroglyphs from Drakensbergs of South Africa illustrating an early hunt with dogs in a manner perhaps analogous to that of the earliest hunter gatherers. Picture used with permission from Vinnicombe P. 1979. People of the Eland: Rock paintings of the Drakenbergs Bushmen as a reflection of their life and thought. Pietermaritzberg: University of Natal Press.

Mentions: Although other waves of domestication - of chickens, some pigs, llamas, and water buffalo, among others - took place in China and the Americas [7], most of the Western barnyard animals and the cat were domesticated between 12,000 and 8,000 years ago in a region of the Middle East known as the Fertile Crescent [7-10] and are exclusively the product of a sedentary, agricultural, civilized life [7,9,11]. Dogs have been considered as an important exception, the suspicion being that they were domesticated earlier and (perhaps) elsewhere, the product of a still more distant and primitive hunter-gatherer past [12] (Figure 1). The conventional thinking has been that wolves, being highly mobile, were naturally well equipped to follow bands of hunters, of no fixed address, as they roved the end of the Paleolithic in search of game. Proto-dogs might have scavenged kills left behind by humans as they moved in search of new game, gradually becoming accustomed to human contact until, over generations, a fully domesticated dog evolved, ready to be put to work [9].


Top dogs: wolf domestication and wealth.

Driscoll CA, Macdonald DW - J. Biol. (2010)

Petroglyphs from Drakensbergs of South Africa illustrating an early hunt with dogs in a manner perhaps analogous to that of the earliest hunter gatherers. Picture used with permission from Vinnicombe P. 1979. People of the Eland: Rock paintings of the Drakenbergs Bushmen as a reflection of their life and thought. Pietermaritzberg: University of Natal Press.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2871521&req=5

Figure 1: Petroglyphs from Drakensbergs of South Africa illustrating an early hunt with dogs in a manner perhaps analogous to that of the earliest hunter gatherers. Picture used with permission from Vinnicombe P. 1979. People of the Eland: Rock paintings of the Drakenbergs Bushmen as a reflection of their life and thought. Pietermaritzberg: University of Natal Press.
Mentions: Although other waves of domestication - of chickens, some pigs, llamas, and water buffalo, among others - took place in China and the Americas [7], most of the Western barnyard animals and the cat were domesticated between 12,000 and 8,000 years ago in a region of the Middle East known as the Fertile Crescent [7-10] and are exclusively the product of a sedentary, agricultural, civilized life [7,9,11]. Dogs have been considered as an important exception, the suspicion being that they were domesticated earlier and (perhaps) elsewhere, the product of a still more distant and primitive hunter-gatherer past [12] (Figure 1). The conventional thinking has been that wolves, being highly mobile, were naturally well equipped to follow bands of hunters, of no fixed address, as they roved the end of the Paleolithic in search of game. Proto-dogs might have scavenged kills left behind by humans as they moved in search of new game, gradually becoming accustomed to human contact until, over generations, a fully domesticated dog evolved, ready to be put to work [9].

Bottom Line: A phylogeographic analysis of gene sequences important in determining body size in dogs, recently published in BMC Biology, traces the appearance of small body size to the Neolithic Middle East.This finding strengthens the association of this event with the development of sedentary societies, and perhaps even has implications for the inception of human social inequality.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, The Recanati-Kaplan Centre, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Tubney House, Abingdon Road, Tubney, Abingdon OX135QL, UK.

ABSTRACT
A phylogeographic analysis of gene sequences important in determining body size in dogs, recently published in BMC Biology, traces the appearance of small body size to the Neolithic Middle East. This finding strengthens the association of this event with the development of sedentary societies, and perhaps even has implications for the inception of human social inequality.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus