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Patterns of self-reported behaviour change associated with receiving voluntary counselling and testing in a longitudinal study from Manicaland, Zimbabwe.

Cremin I, Nyamukapa C, Sherr L, Hallett TB, Chawira G, Cauchemez S, Lopman B, Garnett GP, Gregson S - AIDS Behav (2009)

Bottom Line: Among those testing positive, this risk reduction was enhanced with time since testing.Among men, no behavioural risk reduction associated with VCT was observed.This study suggests that, among women, particularly those who are infected, behavioural risk reduction does occur following VCT.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, St. Marys Campus, Norfolk Place, Paddington, London, W2 1PG, UK. ide.cremin05@imperial.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
Voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) is promoted as a potential HIV prevention measure. We describe trends in uptake of VCT for HIV, and patterns of subsequent behaviour change associated with receiving VCT in a population-based open cohort in Manicaland, Zimbabwe. The relationship between receipt of VCT and subsequent reported behaviour was analysed using generalized linear models with random effects. At the third survey, 8.6% of participants (1,079/12,533), had previously received VCT. Women who received VCT, both those positive and negative, reduced their reported number of new partners. Among those testing positive, this risk reduction was enhanced with time since testing. Among men, no behavioural risk reduction associated with VCT was observed. Significant increases in consistent condom use, with regular or non-regular partners, following VCT, were not observed. This study suggests that, among women, particularly those who are infected, behavioural risk reduction does occur following VCT.

Show MeSH
Previous uptake of testing and results collection reported by individuals at each survey round (N = 17,874). In earlier study rounds (1998–2000 and 2001–2003) those who reported to have tested may include those who were tested for medical purposes but did not receive their results
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Fig1: Previous uptake of testing and results collection reported by individuals at each survey round (N = 17,874). In earlier study rounds (1998–2000 and 2001–2003) those who reported to have tested may include those who were tested for medical purposes but did not receive their results

Mentions: The reported uptake of testing, counselling and collection of results at each survey is shown in Fig. 1. In the second survey, 18% (1,216/6,559) of participants reported having had a previous HIV test. However, of these, only 56% (680/1,216) reported collecting their test results. In the third survey, 10% (1,248/12,533) of participants reported having tested. Of these, 86% (1,079/1,248) received their results. Overall, 8.6% (1,079/12,533) of participants in the third survey were defined as having previously received VCT. Individuals receiving VCT from the research programme at the third survey are not defined as having received VCT for analysis purposes, as they received VCT after completing the survey questionnaire.Fig. 1


Patterns of self-reported behaviour change associated with receiving voluntary counselling and testing in a longitudinal study from Manicaland, Zimbabwe.

Cremin I, Nyamukapa C, Sherr L, Hallett TB, Chawira G, Cauchemez S, Lopman B, Garnett GP, Gregson S - AIDS Behav (2009)

Previous uptake of testing and results collection reported by individuals at each survey round (N = 17,874). In earlier study rounds (1998–2000 and 2001–2003) those who reported to have tested may include those who were tested for medical purposes but did not receive their results
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2865634&req=5

Fig1: Previous uptake of testing and results collection reported by individuals at each survey round (N = 17,874). In earlier study rounds (1998–2000 and 2001–2003) those who reported to have tested may include those who were tested for medical purposes but did not receive their results
Mentions: The reported uptake of testing, counselling and collection of results at each survey is shown in Fig. 1. In the second survey, 18% (1,216/6,559) of participants reported having had a previous HIV test. However, of these, only 56% (680/1,216) reported collecting their test results. In the third survey, 10% (1,248/12,533) of participants reported having tested. Of these, 86% (1,079/1,248) received their results. Overall, 8.6% (1,079/12,533) of participants in the third survey were defined as having previously received VCT. Individuals receiving VCT from the research programme at the third survey are not defined as having received VCT for analysis purposes, as they received VCT after completing the survey questionnaire.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Among those testing positive, this risk reduction was enhanced with time since testing.Among men, no behavioural risk reduction associated with VCT was observed.This study suggests that, among women, particularly those who are infected, behavioural risk reduction does occur following VCT.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, St. Marys Campus, Norfolk Place, Paddington, London, W2 1PG, UK. ide.cremin05@imperial.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
Voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) is promoted as a potential HIV prevention measure. We describe trends in uptake of VCT for HIV, and patterns of subsequent behaviour change associated with receiving VCT in a population-based open cohort in Manicaland, Zimbabwe. The relationship between receipt of VCT and subsequent reported behaviour was analysed using generalized linear models with random effects. At the third survey, 8.6% of participants (1,079/12,533), had previously received VCT. Women who received VCT, both those positive and negative, reduced their reported number of new partners. Among those testing positive, this risk reduction was enhanced with time since testing. Among men, no behavioural risk reduction associated with VCT was observed. Significant increases in consistent condom use, with regular or non-regular partners, following VCT, were not observed. This study suggests that, among women, particularly those who are infected, behavioural risk reduction does occur following VCT.

Show MeSH