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Novel Paraconiothyrium species on stone fruit trees and other woody hosts.

Damm U, Verkley GJ, Crous PW, Fourie PH, Haegi A, Riccioni L - Persoonia (2008)

Bottom Line: Morphological and cultural characteristics as well as DNA sequence data (5.8S nrDNA, ITS1, ITS2, partial SSU nrDNA) were used to characterise them.Two new species are described, namely Paraconiothyrium variabile sp. nov. on Prunus persica and Prunus salicina from South Africa, on Actinidia spp. from Italy and on Laurus nobilis from Turkey, and Paraconiothyrium africanum sp. nov. on Prunus persica from South Africa.Although other known species of Paraconiothyrium commonly produce aseptate conidia, those of P. africanum and P. hawaiiense comb. nov. are predominantly two-celled.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Pathology, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, Stellenbosch 7602, South Africa;

ABSTRACT
Coniothyrium-like fungi are common wood and soil inhabitants and hyperparasites on other fungi. They belong to different fungal genera within the Pleosporales. Several isolates were obtained on wood of different Prunus species (plum, peach and nectarine) from South Africa, on Actinidia species from Italy and on Laurus nobilis from Turkey. Morphological and cultural characteristics as well as DNA sequence data (5.8S nrDNA, ITS1, ITS2, partial SSU nrDNA) were used to characterise them. The isolates belonged to three species of the recently established genus Paraconiothyrium. This is the first report of Paraconiothyrium brasiliense on Prunus spp. from South Africa. Two new species are described, namely Paraconiothyrium variabile sp. nov. on Prunus persica and Prunus salicina from South Africa, on Actinidia spp. from Italy and on Laurus nobilis from Turkey, and Paraconiothyrium africanum sp. nov. on Prunus persica from South Africa. Although other known species of Paraconiothyrium commonly produce aseptate conidia, those of P. africanum and P. hawaiiense comb. nov. are predominantly two-celled.

No MeSH data available.


Strict consensus tree obtained from SSU sequence data of Pleosporales and Dothideales (Length: 353 steps, CI: 0.552, RI: 0.819, RC: 0.452, HI: 0.448). Bootstrap support values (1 000 replicates) above 50 % are shown at the nodes. Peziza echinospora AF006309 was used as outgroup. Isolates analysed in this study are emphasized in bold.
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Figure 1: Strict consensus tree obtained from SSU sequence data of Pleosporales and Dothideales (Length: 353 steps, CI: 0.552, RI: 0.819, RC: 0.452, HI: 0.448). Bootstrap support values (1 000 replicates) above 50 % are shown at the nodes. Peziza echinospora AF006309 was used as outgroup. Isolates analysed in this study are emphasized in bold.

Mentions: Genomic DNA of all isolates was extracted from fungal mycelium grown on PDA plates following the protocol of Damm et al. (in press). The 5.8S ribosomal gene with the two flanking internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 18S rDNA gene (SSU) were amplified and sequenced using the primer pairs ITS1F (Gardes & Bruns 1993) and ITS4 (White et al. 1990) or ITS5 (White et al. 1990) and ITS4, NS1 and NS8 (White et al. 1990), as well as the primers NS2, NS3, NS4, NS5 (White et al. 1990) and NS24 (Gargas & Taylor 1992). The sequences were added to the outgroup (ITS: Helminthosporium velutinum AF145704 and Helminthosporium solani AF163089, SSU: Peziza echinospora AF006309) and sequences obtained from GenBank (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov). GenBank accession numbers and corresponding taxon names are given in Fig. 1 & 2. The alignments were assembled and manually adjusted using Sequence Alignment Editor v. 2.0a11 (Rambaut 2002). Phylogenetic analyses were performed using PAUP (Phylogenetic Analysis Using Parsimony) v. 4.0b10 (Swofford 2003). All characters were unordered and of equal weight. Characters with insertions/deletions, ambiguous position homology as well as constant characters were excluded from the ITS analyses. Gaps, uninformative and constant characters were excluded from the SSU analyses. Maximum parsimony analyses were performed using the heuristic search option with 100 random sequence additions and tree bisection and reconstruction (TBR) as the branch-swapping algorithm. The robustness of the trees obtained was evaluated by 1 000 bootstrap replications (Hillis & Bull 1993) with 100 random sequence additions. Tree length, consistency index (CI), retention index (RI), rescaled consistency index (RC), and homoplasy index (HI) were calculated for the resulting trees. Sequences derived in this study were lodged at GenBank (Table 1), and the alignments in TreeBASE (TreeBASE: 12345).


Novel Paraconiothyrium species on stone fruit trees and other woody hosts.

Damm U, Verkley GJ, Crous PW, Fourie PH, Haegi A, Riccioni L - Persoonia (2008)

Strict consensus tree obtained from SSU sequence data of Pleosporales and Dothideales (Length: 353 steps, CI: 0.552, RI: 0.819, RC: 0.452, HI: 0.448). Bootstrap support values (1 000 replicates) above 50 % are shown at the nodes. Peziza echinospora AF006309 was used as outgroup. Isolates analysed in this study are emphasized in bold.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2865355&req=5

Figure 1: Strict consensus tree obtained from SSU sequence data of Pleosporales and Dothideales (Length: 353 steps, CI: 0.552, RI: 0.819, RC: 0.452, HI: 0.448). Bootstrap support values (1 000 replicates) above 50 % are shown at the nodes. Peziza echinospora AF006309 was used as outgroup. Isolates analysed in this study are emphasized in bold.
Mentions: Genomic DNA of all isolates was extracted from fungal mycelium grown on PDA plates following the protocol of Damm et al. (in press). The 5.8S ribosomal gene with the two flanking internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 18S rDNA gene (SSU) were amplified and sequenced using the primer pairs ITS1F (Gardes & Bruns 1993) and ITS4 (White et al. 1990) or ITS5 (White et al. 1990) and ITS4, NS1 and NS8 (White et al. 1990), as well as the primers NS2, NS3, NS4, NS5 (White et al. 1990) and NS24 (Gargas & Taylor 1992). The sequences were added to the outgroup (ITS: Helminthosporium velutinum AF145704 and Helminthosporium solani AF163089, SSU: Peziza echinospora AF006309) and sequences obtained from GenBank (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov). GenBank accession numbers and corresponding taxon names are given in Fig. 1 & 2. The alignments were assembled and manually adjusted using Sequence Alignment Editor v. 2.0a11 (Rambaut 2002). Phylogenetic analyses were performed using PAUP (Phylogenetic Analysis Using Parsimony) v. 4.0b10 (Swofford 2003). All characters were unordered and of equal weight. Characters with insertions/deletions, ambiguous position homology as well as constant characters were excluded from the ITS analyses. Gaps, uninformative and constant characters were excluded from the SSU analyses. Maximum parsimony analyses were performed using the heuristic search option with 100 random sequence additions and tree bisection and reconstruction (TBR) as the branch-swapping algorithm. The robustness of the trees obtained was evaluated by 1 000 bootstrap replications (Hillis & Bull 1993) with 100 random sequence additions. Tree length, consistency index (CI), retention index (RI), rescaled consistency index (RC), and homoplasy index (HI) were calculated for the resulting trees. Sequences derived in this study were lodged at GenBank (Table 1), and the alignments in TreeBASE (TreeBASE: 12345).

Bottom Line: Morphological and cultural characteristics as well as DNA sequence data (5.8S nrDNA, ITS1, ITS2, partial SSU nrDNA) were used to characterise them.Two new species are described, namely Paraconiothyrium variabile sp. nov. on Prunus persica and Prunus salicina from South Africa, on Actinidia spp. from Italy and on Laurus nobilis from Turkey, and Paraconiothyrium africanum sp. nov. on Prunus persica from South Africa.Although other known species of Paraconiothyrium commonly produce aseptate conidia, those of P. africanum and P. hawaiiense comb. nov. are predominantly two-celled.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Pathology, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, Stellenbosch 7602, South Africa;

ABSTRACT
Coniothyrium-like fungi are common wood and soil inhabitants and hyperparasites on other fungi. They belong to different fungal genera within the Pleosporales. Several isolates were obtained on wood of different Prunus species (plum, peach and nectarine) from South Africa, on Actinidia species from Italy and on Laurus nobilis from Turkey. Morphological and cultural characteristics as well as DNA sequence data (5.8S nrDNA, ITS1, ITS2, partial SSU nrDNA) were used to characterise them. The isolates belonged to three species of the recently established genus Paraconiothyrium. This is the first report of Paraconiothyrium brasiliense on Prunus spp. from South Africa. Two new species are described, namely Paraconiothyrium variabile sp. nov. on Prunus persica and Prunus salicina from South Africa, on Actinidia spp. from Italy and on Laurus nobilis from Turkey, and Paraconiothyrium africanum sp. nov. on Prunus persica from South Africa. Although other known species of Paraconiothyrium commonly produce aseptate conidia, those of P. africanum and P. hawaiiense comb. nov. are predominantly two-celled.

No MeSH data available.