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Potential role of stem cells in management of COPD.

Hackett TL, Knight DA, Sin DD - Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis (2010)

Bottom Line: The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation of the airways and progressive destruction of lung parenchyma, a process that in most cases is initiated by cigarette smoking.Regeneration of lung tissue by stem cells from endogenous and exogenous sources is a promising therapeutic strategy.Herein we review the current literature on the characterization of resident stem and progenitor cell niches within the lung, the contribution of mesenchymal stem cells to lung regeneration, and advances in bioengineering of lung tissue.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UBC James Hogg Research Centre, Heart and Lung Institute, St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a worldwide epidemic affecting over 200 million people and accounting for more than three million deaths annually. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation of the airways and progressive destruction of lung parenchyma, a process that in most cases is initiated by cigarette smoking. Unfortunately, there are no interventions that have been unequivocally shown to prolong survival in patients with COPD. Regeneration of lung tissue by stem cells from endogenous and exogenous sources is a promising therapeutic strategy. Herein we review the current literature on the characterization of resident stem and progenitor cell niches within the lung, the contribution of mesenchymal stem cells to lung regeneration, and advances in bioengineering of lung tissue.

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Illustration of putative stem/progenitor cells which have been demonstrated within the four trophic regions of the human lung, ie, trachea, bronchi, bronchioles and alveoli. Reprinted with permission of the American Thoracic Society. Copyright © 2008, American Thoracic Society. X, Engelhardt JF. The glandular stem/progenitor cell niche in airway development and repair. Proc Am Thorac Soc. 2008;5(6):682–688.
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f1-copd-5-081: Illustration of putative stem/progenitor cells which have been demonstrated within the four trophic regions of the human lung, ie, trachea, bronchi, bronchioles and alveoli. Reprinted with permission of the American Thoracic Society. Copyright © 2008, American Thoracic Society. X, Engelhardt JF. The glandular stem/progenitor cell niche in airway development and repair. Proc Am Thorac Soc. 2008;5(6):682–688.

Mentions: The adult human lung comprises various trophic units which are each lined by specialized types of airway epithelia.26 The ability of the lung to repair itself in the setting of injury is determined by the molecular events that mobilize the resident stem and progenitor cells within each of the trophic units. Stem cells and progenitors are similar in that they both proliferate and give rise to differentiated cells but only stem cells are capable of self-renewal.27 The reader is referred to Figure 1 for the putative stem and progenitor cell niches within the human lung.


Potential role of stem cells in management of COPD.

Hackett TL, Knight DA, Sin DD - Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis (2010)

Illustration of putative stem/progenitor cells which have been demonstrated within the four trophic regions of the human lung, ie, trachea, bronchi, bronchioles and alveoli. Reprinted with permission of the American Thoracic Society. Copyright © 2008, American Thoracic Society. X, Engelhardt JF. The glandular stem/progenitor cell niche in airway development and repair. Proc Am Thorac Soc. 2008;5(6):682–688.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2865028&req=5

f1-copd-5-081: Illustration of putative stem/progenitor cells which have been demonstrated within the four trophic regions of the human lung, ie, trachea, bronchi, bronchioles and alveoli. Reprinted with permission of the American Thoracic Society. Copyright © 2008, American Thoracic Society. X, Engelhardt JF. The glandular stem/progenitor cell niche in airway development and repair. Proc Am Thorac Soc. 2008;5(6):682–688.
Mentions: The adult human lung comprises various trophic units which are each lined by specialized types of airway epithelia.26 The ability of the lung to repair itself in the setting of injury is determined by the molecular events that mobilize the resident stem and progenitor cells within each of the trophic units. Stem cells and progenitors are similar in that they both proliferate and give rise to differentiated cells but only stem cells are capable of self-renewal.27 The reader is referred to Figure 1 for the putative stem and progenitor cell niches within the human lung.

Bottom Line: The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation of the airways and progressive destruction of lung parenchyma, a process that in most cases is initiated by cigarette smoking.Regeneration of lung tissue by stem cells from endogenous and exogenous sources is a promising therapeutic strategy.Herein we review the current literature on the characterization of resident stem and progenitor cell niches within the lung, the contribution of mesenchymal stem cells to lung regeneration, and advances in bioengineering of lung tissue.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UBC James Hogg Research Centre, Heart and Lung Institute, St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a worldwide epidemic affecting over 200 million people and accounting for more than three million deaths annually. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation of the airways and progressive destruction of lung parenchyma, a process that in most cases is initiated by cigarette smoking. Unfortunately, there are no interventions that have been unequivocally shown to prolong survival in patients with COPD. Regeneration of lung tissue by stem cells from endogenous and exogenous sources is a promising therapeutic strategy. Herein we review the current literature on the characterization of resident stem and progenitor cell niches within the lung, the contribution of mesenchymal stem cells to lung regeneration, and advances in bioengineering of lung tissue.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus