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Nanomedicine for the reduction of the thrombogenicity of stent coatings.

Karagkiozaki VC, Logothetidis SD, Kassavetis SN, Giannoglou GD - Int J Nanomedicine (2010)

Bottom Line: Platelet-rich plasma from healthy donors was used for the real-time study of biointerfacial interactions.The carbon nanomaterials were developed by rf magnetron sputtering technique under controllable deposition conditions to provide favorable surface nanotopography.This is an actual solution for improving the stent coating fabrication.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Medical School, AHEPA University General Hospital, 1st Cardiology Department, Cardiovascular Engineering and Atherosclerosis Laboratory, Greece.

ABSTRACT
The treatment of patients with drug-eluting stents (DES) continues to evolve with the current emergence of DES technology that offers a combination of pharmacological and mechanical approaches to prevent arterial restenosis. However, despite the promising short-term and mid-term outcomes of DES, there are valid concerns about adverse clinical effects of late stent thrombosis. In this study, we present an example of how nanomedicine can offer solutions for improving stent coating manufacturing, by producing nanomaterials with tailored and controllable properties. The study is based on the exploitation of human platelets response towards carbon-based nanocoatings via atomic force microscope (AFM). AFM can facilitate the comprehensive analysis of platelets behavior onto stent nanocoatings and enable the study of thrombogenicity. Platelet-rich plasma from healthy donors was used for the real-time study of biointerfacial interactions. The carbon nanomaterials were developed by rf magnetron sputtering technique under controllable deposition conditions to provide favorable surface nanotopography. It was shown that by altering the surface topography of nanocoatings, the activation of platelets can be affected, while the carbon nanocoatings having higher surface roughness were found to be less thrombogenic in terms of platelets adhesion. This is an actual solution for improving the stent coating fabrication.

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SEM images of: A) a human platelet onto carbon substrate, B) inactivated platelets on type B carbon nanocoating with 5% H2 in plasma during deposition, after one hour of incubation and C) activated platelets on to type A carbon nanocoating with 5% H2 in plasma during deposition, after 1 hour of incubation.
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f8-ijn-5-239: SEM images of: A) a human platelet onto carbon substrate, B) inactivated platelets on type B carbon nanocoating with 5% H2 in plasma during deposition, after one hour of incubation and C) activated platelets on to type A carbon nanocoating with 5% H2 in plasma during deposition, after 1 hour of incubation.

Mentions: As a combination of parameters influence the response of blood components towards biomaterials, the nanotopography and surface roughness of the examined films were assessed to correlate with their thrombogenicity. The peak-to-peak and Rrms values of the bare a-C:H nanocoatings (without the platelets) are shown in Table 1 (P < 0.001) type A carbon nanocoatings exhibit lower surface roughness than the type B nanocoatings, which can be attributed to the Ar+ ion bombardment of the growing nanocoating during deposition. In order to validate our results, SEM measurements were made for the visualization of platelets conformation on type A and B carbon nanocoatings with 5% H2 in plasma during deposition after 1 hour of incubation (Figure 8).


Nanomedicine for the reduction of the thrombogenicity of stent coatings.

Karagkiozaki VC, Logothetidis SD, Kassavetis SN, Giannoglou GD - Int J Nanomedicine (2010)

SEM images of: A) a human platelet onto carbon substrate, B) inactivated platelets on type B carbon nanocoating with 5% H2 in plasma during deposition, after one hour of incubation and C) activated platelets on to type A carbon nanocoating with 5% H2 in plasma during deposition, after 1 hour of incubation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2865019&req=5

f8-ijn-5-239: SEM images of: A) a human platelet onto carbon substrate, B) inactivated platelets on type B carbon nanocoating with 5% H2 in plasma during deposition, after one hour of incubation and C) activated platelets on to type A carbon nanocoating with 5% H2 in plasma during deposition, after 1 hour of incubation.
Mentions: As a combination of parameters influence the response of blood components towards biomaterials, the nanotopography and surface roughness of the examined films were assessed to correlate with their thrombogenicity. The peak-to-peak and Rrms values of the bare a-C:H nanocoatings (without the platelets) are shown in Table 1 (P < 0.001) type A carbon nanocoatings exhibit lower surface roughness than the type B nanocoatings, which can be attributed to the Ar+ ion bombardment of the growing nanocoating during deposition. In order to validate our results, SEM measurements were made for the visualization of platelets conformation on type A and B carbon nanocoatings with 5% H2 in plasma during deposition after 1 hour of incubation (Figure 8).

Bottom Line: Platelet-rich plasma from healthy donors was used for the real-time study of biointerfacial interactions.The carbon nanomaterials were developed by rf magnetron sputtering technique under controllable deposition conditions to provide favorable surface nanotopography.This is an actual solution for improving the stent coating fabrication.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Medical School, AHEPA University General Hospital, 1st Cardiology Department, Cardiovascular Engineering and Atherosclerosis Laboratory, Greece.

ABSTRACT
The treatment of patients with drug-eluting stents (DES) continues to evolve with the current emergence of DES technology that offers a combination of pharmacological and mechanical approaches to prevent arterial restenosis. However, despite the promising short-term and mid-term outcomes of DES, there are valid concerns about adverse clinical effects of late stent thrombosis. In this study, we present an example of how nanomedicine can offer solutions for improving stent coating manufacturing, by producing nanomaterials with tailored and controllable properties. The study is based on the exploitation of human platelets response towards carbon-based nanocoatings via atomic force microscope (AFM). AFM can facilitate the comprehensive analysis of platelets behavior onto stent nanocoatings and enable the study of thrombogenicity. Platelet-rich plasma from healthy donors was used for the real-time study of biointerfacial interactions. The carbon nanomaterials were developed by rf magnetron sputtering technique under controllable deposition conditions to provide favorable surface nanotopography. It was shown that by altering the surface topography of nanocoatings, the activation of platelets can be affected, while the carbon nanocoatings having higher surface roughness were found to be less thrombogenic in terms of platelets adhesion. This is an actual solution for improving the stent coating fabrication.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus