Limits...
The effect of acetaminophen nanoparticles on liver toxicity in a rat model.

Biazar E, Rezayat SM, Montazeri N, Pourshamsian K, Zeinali R, Asefnejad A, Rahimi M, Zadehzare M, Mahmoudi M, Mazinani R, Ziaei M - Int J Nanomedicine (2010)

Bottom Line: By a high energy mechanically activated method, we produced acetaminophen in a nanometer crystalline size (24 nm).Statistical analysis and pathological figures indicated that ALT delivery and toxicity in reduced size acetaminophen was significantly reduced when compared with normal size acetaminophen.Pathology figures exhibited reduced necrosis effects, especially the confluent necrosis, in the central part of the lobule in the reduced size acetaminophen samples when compared with the normal samples.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Tonekabon Branch, Mazandaran, Iran. e.biazar@tonekaboniau.ac.ir

ABSTRACT
Acetaminophen, a pain-reliever, is one of the most widely used medications in the world. Acetaminophen with normal dosage is considered a nontoxic drug for therapeutic applications, but when taken at overdose levels it produces liver damage in human and various animal species. By a high energy mechanically activated method, we produced acetaminophen in a nanometer crystalline size (24 nm). Forty-eight hours after injection of crystalline particles with normal and reduced size of our drug, the effect of liver toxicity was compared by determination of liver transferase enzymes such as alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). These enzymes were examined by routine colorimetric methods using commercial kits and pathologic investigations. Statistical analysis and pathological figures indicated that ALT delivery and toxicity in reduced size acetaminophen was significantly reduced when compared with normal size acetaminophen. Pathology figures exhibited reduced necrosis effects, especially the confluent necrosis, in the central part of the lobule in the reduced size acetaminophen samples when compared with the normal samples.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Images of the liver tissue injected with the normal size acetaminophen, (A) with high resolution, and (B) with low resolution.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2865014&req=5

f2-ijn-5-197: Images of the liver tissue injected with the normal size acetaminophen, (A) with high resolution, and (B) with low resolution.

Mentions: Figures 1 and 2 display the pathological images of two liver tissue samples: i) the reduced size acetaminophen samples (24 nm); and ii) the normal size samples. Figure 1 is related to the reduced size acetaminophen samples (3L). In this liver sample, spotty necrosis around the central vein can be clearly identified. Figure 2 shows the normal size acetaminophen samples. In addition to the spotty necrosis, the confluent necrosis can also be observed around the central vein. Figure 2 shows the damage to the nucleuses and the cytoplasm.


The effect of acetaminophen nanoparticles on liver toxicity in a rat model.

Biazar E, Rezayat SM, Montazeri N, Pourshamsian K, Zeinali R, Asefnejad A, Rahimi M, Zadehzare M, Mahmoudi M, Mazinani R, Ziaei M - Int J Nanomedicine (2010)

Images of the liver tissue injected with the normal size acetaminophen, (A) with high resolution, and (B) with low resolution.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2865014&req=5

f2-ijn-5-197: Images of the liver tissue injected with the normal size acetaminophen, (A) with high resolution, and (B) with low resolution.
Mentions: Figures 1 and 2 display the pathological images of two liver tissue samples: i) the reduced size acetaminophen samples (24 nm); and ii) the normal size samples. Figure 1 is related to the reduced size acetaminophen samples (3L). In this liver sample, spotty necrosis around the central vein can be clearly identified. Figure 2 shows the normal size acetaminophen samples. In addition to the spotty necrosis, the confluent necrosis can also be observed around the central vein. Figure 2 shows the damage to the nucleuses and the cytoplasm.

Bottom Line: By a high energy mechanically activated method, we produced acetaminophen in a nanometer crystalline size (24 nm).Statistical analysis and pathological figures indicated that ALT delivery and toxicity in reduced size acetaminophen was significantly reduced when compared with normal size acetaminophen.Pathology figures exhibited reduced necrosis effects, especially the confluent necrosis, in the central part of the lobule in the reduced size acetaminophen samples when compared with the normal samples.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Tonekabon Branch, Mazandaran, Iran. e.biazar@tonekaboniau.ac.ir

ABSTRACT
Acetaminophen, a pain-reliever, is one of the most widely used medications in the world. Acetaminophen with normal dosage is considered a nontoxic drug for therapeutic applications, but when taken at overdose levels it produces liver damage in human and various animal species. By a high energy mechanically activated method, we produced acetaminophen in a nanometer crystalline size (24 nm). Forty-eight hours after injection of crystalline particles with normal and reduced size of our drug, the effect of liver toxicity was compared by determination of liver transferase enzymes such as alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). These enzymes were examined by routine colorimetric methods using commercial kits and pathologic investigations. Statistical analysis and pathological figures indicated that ALT delivery and toxicity in reduced size acetaminophen was significantly reduced when compared with normal size acetaminophen. Pathology figures exhibited reduced necrosis effects, especially the confluent necrosis, in the central part of the lobule in the reduced size acetaminophen samples when compared with the normal samples.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus